Apple's U.S. forestry programs generated more than 13,000 metric tons of wood in 2016, cre...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2017
Two years after Apple partnered with The Conservation Fund to protect more than 36,000 acres of vulnerable forestland in Maine and North Carolina, the ambitious project is showing returns, with more than 13,000 metric tons of wood harvested between the two states last year.


Brunswick Forest | Photo credit: The Conservation Fund


Dubbed a sustainable harvesting initiative, Apple in 2015 purchased more than 32,400 acres of forestland along the Mattawamkeag River in Maine and over 3,600 acres of pine and hardwood forest in Brunswick County, North Carolina through The Conservation Fund's Working Forest Fund.

New statistics shared with the Triangle Business Journal on Wednesday show harvesting output from both forests in 2016 was equivalent to approximately 30 percent of Apple's product packaging needs in 2015. Specifically, the 13,000 metric tons of wood were processed into virgin fiber, which was then used to make boxes, bags and other materials.

In addition to wood, Apple's program created jobs more than 30 jobs in the Brunswick Forest region, says Jena Thompson Meredith, vice president of business partnerships at The Conservation Fund. Workers were needed for survey work, site preparation, harvesting, planting and other supporting roles. In total, logging operations resulted in more than 10 jobs per 1,000 acres.

As for sustainability efforts, The Conservation Fund planted 185,000 trees throughout 300 acres of Brunswick Forest. The group also put down 40 acres of native longleaf pine and Atlantic white cedar trees, both of which help provide shelter for a rare butterfly.

Apple's North Carolina forest tract is located next to the Green Swamp Preserve, home to at least six rare species including the carnivorous Venus fly trap.

Apple vice president of Environment, Policy, and Social Initiatives Lisa Jackson shared the story on social media earlier today. When Apple first announced the forestry initiative in 2015, Jackson and Larry Selzer, president and CEO of The Conservation Fund, wrote a letter of intent explaining the project.

"Apple believes that paper, like energy, can be a renewable resource," they wrote. "So Apple is striving to supply 100 percent of the virgin fibers used in its paper and packaging from sustainably managed forests or controlled wood sources."

A month after announcing the Maine and North Carolina forest efforts, Apple revealed plans to create one million acres of responsibly managed forestland in China through with the help of the World Wildlife Fund.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    Vision, public service and education. I really love this company. They continue to set the standard on some many fronts.
    lolliverstanthemanksecSolibartfatwatto_cobraMacProStrangeDaysdewme
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Those trees in the photo are the same ones that Clint Eastwood sang to in "Paint Your Wagon." (I recognize them by their bark and knots.)
  • Reply 3 of 12
    MikeymikeMikeymike Posts: 102member
    Think this story will shutup that 'fmalloy' guy?
    Nah, neither do I.
  • Reply 4 of 12
    ...alt.opinion might ask if Apple may actually simply be securing a reliable supply source of future packaging material, perhaps more urgently needed than expected given the revised resource mindset of the latest governance...?
  • Reply 5 of 12
    CuJoYYCCuJoYYC Posts: 22member
    "13,000 metric tons" or as the rest of the world calls it, 13,000 tonnes. But thanks for using metric measurements. :-)
    singularity
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Apple is logging AND planting new trees to replace those cut down. Some parts of the world have been doing this for more than 200years and it is not a big deal. It seems that strip logging still rules in his part of the world (cut down and do not replace). Brings in more profit in the short term. Long term? Not a chance.
    Even I do it with my measly 4.5 hectare wood. I cut three Ash trees down in Dec 2015. They are for burning on my fire. These were thinnings. This leaves more room in the canopy for other trees to flourish. I've also planted sixteen Silver Birch trees this past winter.
    edited March 2017 jony0
  • Reply 7 of 12
    I really appreciate companies like this. There are many companies that are well off and don't work to make the world a better place. We need more Apples.
    apple jockey
  • Reply 8 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,060member
    Good article and excellent ammunition for the next time some idiot starts spewing the ‘slave labor’ meme. Apple appears to be fully committed to sustainable energy, sustainable raw materials, fairer working conditions, sustainable success. Of course there are other areas that all companies need to work on, like conflict minerals in Africa driving child labor. But let’s be happy about what Apple has accomplished for once instead of trashing them over what they need to work on. Unless I have blindfolds on I don’t see other tech companies doing nearly the amount of environmental work Apple is. 
    montrosemacsapple jockey
  • Reply 9 of 12
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,110member
    frugality said:
    Trees.  Whoopee.  How righteous of Apple.


    At first, I wanted to ignore you.

    Then I thought I'd tell you to fuck off.

    But then I thought that would not be good if you were just being facetious.

    Then I sampled your posting history. So I decided to say...

    Fuck off!

    Well said!
     Apple is logging AND planting new trees to replace those cut down. Some parts of the world have been doing this for more than 200years and it is not a big deal. It seems that strip logging still rules in his part of the world (cut down and do not replace). Brings in more profit in the short term. Long term? Not a chance.
    Even I do it with my measly 4.5 hectare wood. I cut three Ash trees down in Dec 2015. They are for burning on my fire. These were thinnings. This leaves more room in the canopy for other trees to flourish. I've also planted sixteen Silver Birch trees this past winter.

    Which is why there's more tree's in the U.S. then before there was a U.S. We don't have a lot of the old growth forests we used to have. Tree's get cut in one section and new ones planted in another. Tree's are a renewable resource.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,215member
    CuJoYYC said:
    "13,000 metric tons" or as the rest of the world calls it, 13,000 tonnes. But thanks for using metric measurements. :-)
    Hey, I'll only be happy when a pint of beer in the USA is 20 fluid ounces like everywhere else in the world ... ;)
  • Reply 11 of 12
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,138member
    Vision, public service and education. I really love this company. They continue to set the standard on some many fronts.
    But they don't seem to have the vision to use post-consumer materials nor set the standard for using it. Apple still uses the most expensive packaging materials and still uses too many packaging materials.

    This forestry stuff is a green washing of the issues. Just like the rest of their "environmental actions" are distractions away from their production of disposable electronics.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    dysamoria said:
     
    But they don't seem to have the vision to use post-consumer materials nor set the standard for using it. Apple still uses the most expensive packaging materials and still uses too many packaging materials.

    This forestry stuff is a green washing of the issues. Just like the rest of their "environmental actions" are distractions away from their production of disposable electronics.

    Always room for improvement and much still to be done. Progress on the environmental front happens in fits and starts. In my opinion Apple has led, innovated and set forth a progressive and exemplary example for similar industry, individuals and governments. Along with putting their money where their mouth is, few other business even show lip service on environmental issues, land use and alternative energy usage. Easy to find fault in the progress thus far, when there is so much to do. But, you would be hard pressed to find a better arbiter or protector on environmental issues at this scale. 

    edited March 2017
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