Apple to release iTunes on Windows Store, ensuring compatibility with Windows 10 S

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited May 2017
With Microsoft's forthcoming education-focused Windows 10 S operating system only allowing applications from the Windows Store, Apple will release its popular iTunes application on the official digital storefront, ensuring students will still have access to the media and management tool.




Microsoft officially announced that iTunes is coming to the Windows Store as part of its Build developer event on Thursday. Though the importance of iTunes on Windows was lessened greatly when iPhones and iPads gained the ability to be activated without a computer, it still remains a key part of Apple's ecosystem not only for device management, but also for purchasing content and using services like Apple Music.

Microsoft said iTunes will be on the Windows Store before the end of this year.

Until now, iTunes has been available as a separate download, not a part of the Windows Store. Its entrance into Microsoft's application store will ensure that iTunes will work with Windows 10 S devices coming to market this year.

Microsoft's Windows 10 S is a stripped-down version of Windows that will only be able to run Windows Store titles, reducing security risks and overhead.

It is still unknown whether Apple's other Windows applications will be headed to the digital storefront. They include AirPort Utility, and QuickTime.

Beyond Apple, Microsoft also announced that streaming music service Spotify will be on the Windows Store. In addition, three popular Linux distributions--Ubuntu, SUSE and Fedora --will be available to download.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    This is interesting: Microsoft has said that "Windows Store apps that browse the web must use HTML and JavaScript engines provided by the Windows Platform." I wonder if that extends to the many HTML-based views in iTunes? Does that mean that Apple will have to create a version that is not WebKit-based?
  • Reply 2 of 18
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,154member
    I'll bet Microsoft relaxed their rules to get iTunes into the store.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    I'll bet Microsoft relaxed their rules to get iTunes into the store.
    I don't know why they would relax their rules for iTunes since Microsoft has their own music, video and TV shows store and a management app called Groove.
  • Reply 4 of 18
    damonfdamonf Posts: 217member
    Note to the AI editors: QuickTime for Windows is deprecated by Apple, they are no longer developing/updating/securing it on the Windows platform.  I know because I had to deinstall it on all PCs at my office (due to no more security updates for it).  But there is still iCloud for Windows in addition to the AirPort Utility you mentioned.
  • Reply 5 of 18
    This is interesting: Microsoft has said that "Windows Store apps that browse the web must use HTML and JavaScript engines provided by the Windows Platform." I wonder if that extends to the many HTML-based views in iTunes? Does that mean that Apple will have to create a version that is not WebKit-based?
    Microsoft's new browser has been developed with the goal of matching WebKit rendering.
    When something renders differently, it considered a bug.
    So when Apple uses Edge's rendering engine, we should see almost no difference.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,154member
    volcan said:
    I'll bet Microsoft relaxed their rules to get iTunes into the store.
    I don't know why they would relax their rules for iTunes since Microsoft has their own music, video and TV shows store and a management app called Groove.
    Because of all the iOS users who also use Windows PCs? I know you don't need iTunes if you do OTA updates and backup to iCloud but there are still things you can't do without iTunes like loading media or custom ringtones onto your device .
  • Reply 7 of 18
    Can I sync my Zune with iTunes now? /s
  • Reply 8 of 18
    jodyfanningjodyfanning Posts: 105member
    This is interesting: Microsoft has said that "Windows Store apps that browse the web must use HTML and JavaScript engines provided by the Windows Platform." I wonder if that extends to the many HTML-based views in iTunes? Does that mean that Apple will have to create a version that is not WebKit-based?
    iTunes doesn't "browse the web". It connects to Apple's services only, so I doubt that rule would apply.

    Although it would be nice if iTunes on Windows was actually Retina.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,154member
    Ben Bajarin says Apple should bring iMessage to Windows. I'm sure Panos Panay would love that. Just one less reason for someone to buy a Mac.
  • Reply 10 of 18
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    volcan said:
    I'll bet Microsoft relaxed their rules to get iTunes into the store.
    I don't know why they would relax their rules for iTunes since Microsoft has their own music, video and TV shows store and a management app called Groove.
    Because of all the iOS users who also use Windows PCs? I know you don't need iTunes if you do OTA updates and backup to iCloud but there are still things you can't do without iTunes like loading media or custom ringtones onto your device .
    I have a Mac or two and I haven't connected my iPhone to iTunes for a very long time. Besides these Windows 10 S machines are supposed to be for education. I'd be surprised if the schools that own them are going to approve of students connecting their iPhone to them. For example our company does not allow it for security reasons. Again I don't see why Microsoft would care that much about iTunes, especially in this usage case? I'd think Apple is more likely the one who wants Windows 10 S users to have iTunes for iTunes U, Podcasts, etc. I just don't think Microsoft cares enough to give Apple a pass on the store rules and I seriously doubt that Apple is giving MS a pass on their store rules.
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 11 of 18
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    This is interesting: Microsoft has said that "Windows Store apps that browse the web must use HTML and JavaScript engines provided by the Windows Platform." I wonder if that extends to the many HTML-based views in iTunes? Does that mean that Apple will have to create a version that is not WebKit-based?
    Microsoft's new browser has been developed with the goal of matching WebKit rendering.
    When something renders differently, it considered a bug.
    So when Apple uses Edge's rendering engine, we should see almost no difference.
    Edge is HORRIBLE, not close to compatible yet, I know because I've got to do all sort of crap just to make things come out right while I get a straight up nice render from Chrome, Firefox and Safari.  Things that have been in Webkit for ages just appeared in the Creator's update!! That tells you everything.
    pscooter63
  • Reply 12 of 18
    gumbigumbi Posts: 148member
    Ben Bajarin says Apple should bring iMessage to Windows. I'm sure Panos Panay would love that. Just one less reason for someone to buy a Mac.

    I'm not sure why most windows users would care with Messaging Everywhere introduced in the creators update.
  • Reply 13 of 18
    gumbigumbi Posts: 148member
    volcan said:
    volcan said:
    I'll bet Microsoft relaxed their rules to get iTunes into the store.
    I don't know why they would relax their rules for iTunes since Microsoft has their own music, video and TV shows store and a management app called Groove.
    Because of all the iOS users who also use Windows PCs? I know you don't need iTunes if you do OTA updates and backup to iCloud but there are still things you can't do without iTunes like loading media or custom ringtones onto your device .
    I have a Mac or two and I haven't connected my iPhone to iTunes for a very long time. Besides these Windows 10 S machines are supposed to be for education. I'd be surprised if the schools that own them are going to approve of students connecting their iPhone to them. For example our company does not allow it for security reasons. Again I don't see why Microsoft would care that much about iTunes, especially in this usage case? I'd think Apple is more likely the one who wants Windows 10 S users to have iTunes for iTunes U, Podcasts, etc. I just don't think Microsoft cares enough to give Apple a pass on the store rules and I seriously doubt that Apple is giving MS a pass on their store rules.

    A question very easily answered.  The post primary education market - the same market that the Surface Laptop is aimed at.  It is not unheard of for college textbooks to be available through iTunes in eBook form.
  • Reply 14 of 18
    Even though the impetus was apparently Windows 10 S, I don't see any reason that people running Windows 10 or Windows 10 Pro wouldn't be able to install it through the Windows Store, so like many of them who use iTunes, I'll be taking a good, hard look at installing iTunes through the Windows Store.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    seafoxseafox Posts: 86member
    I'm still using iTunes 10.7. Has the interface stopped sucking yet?
  • Reply 16 of 18
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 3,366member
    Good of Apple, always looking out for its customers.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 18
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 3,366member
    seafox said:
    I'm still using iTunes 10.7. Has the interface stopped sucking yet?

    How should we know? You're the one using it right?
    SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 18
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    Apple should implement a true resume playback feature in iTunes (quit iTunes, open it and it resumes from the song it left on last playback), as SoundJam MP (from which iTunes was developed) had in 2001. That is the most important feature of a music playback application, still missing in iTunes after more than 16 years!
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