Apple Maps gains public transit directions for Las Vegas, Reno, other Nevada regions

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has expanded public transit directions for Maps to several major urban areas in Nevada, most notably Las Vegas and its surroundings.




Residents and visitors can now get times, stops, and routes for options like the Las Vegas Monorail and RTC Transit buses. These include the special Deuce and SDX shuttles, which cater to people touring the Strip and downtown landmarks like the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Other newly-covered regions include Reno, Sparks and Carson City, with bus directions for RTC Washoe and Jump Around Carson. On a state level people can get around using Silverado Mainline buses, or existing options like Amtrak trains.

Apple has been gradually expanding public transit coverage since restoring it in iOS 9. The company stripped out support in 2012's controversial iOS 6, as the app was previously dependent on data from rival Google.

Most of Apple's present coverage is concentrated in the U.S., U.K., China and Japan. Other countries, like Canada and Australia, are limited to one or a handful of cities -- most nations have no transit directions whatsoever.

Apple has yet to update its official roster with mention of Nevada.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,888member
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
  • Reply 2 of 11
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,291member
    True but map is not Apple's focus. Adding public transport is a complex task to complete let alone to make sure it works perfectly. I am glad Apple is still doing it albeit rather slowly.
  • Reply 3 of 11
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Adding "a city" usually means adding a whole Metro area, right now, I'd wager 98% of US transit users are now covered; if you cover just the top 10 metro areas you cover 90-95% so getting to 100% takes a hell of a lot of less city systems. NYC metro transit by itself is 10 times larger than any other region's public transit.
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Wow, and in July too --there are lots of people dumb enough to bet their life on Apple Maps in some of those hotter than Hates places.

    Not sure the photo in this article is completely appropriate btw.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    croprcropr Posts: 1,041member
    entropys said:
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
    It just proves that Apple is a local company with a global reach, while Google is a global company
  • Reply 6 of 11
    I love Google Maps but I'd say the transit directions is the part I use least. From the pic above, Apple Maps possibly suffers from the same problems. I have a local app that is much cleaner and smarter. It knows which stop I'm nearest and which handful of places I tend to go from that stop. If I'm in a rush, it's much easier to navigate than using Maps. If I'm travelling abroad on the other hand, Maps is useful if I don't know the place well.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,254member
    entropys said:
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
    "Glaciers recede faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. "

    There fixed it for you :)
  • Reply 8 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,254member

    cropr said:
    entropys said:
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
    It just proves that Apple is a local company with a global reach, while Google is a global company
    A trip to China may alter that perception.  Of course I'm just being flippant as I am sure you were, I totally understand Google's problems with China.
    edited July 2017
  • Reply 9 of 11
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 450member
    entropys said:
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
    Keep in mind that there are thousands of cities now covered by transit and hundreds of millions population in those areas.  Yes, Apple could have simply thrown the switch and imported all of the transit data at once, like Google did, but Google has been heavily criticized for the inaccuracy and other interface problems, so Apple wanted to avoid that and instead is going through the much more difficult route of customizing each area for transit.  It definitely is much more expensive and time consuming, but Apple has been receiving great reviews for its approach to transit.  The below article explains the difference in how Google and Apple have approached transit.

    http://http//appleinsider.com/articles/16/07/07/why-apples-transit-maps-are-rolling-out-so-slowly

    After a disaster of a rollout, Apple Maps has been improving steadily and has improved so much that usage is also growing steadily.  Most folks aren't aware that Apple Maps is now used many BILLIONS of times a week and is now used on Apple devices exponentially more than Google Maps, over 3 to 1.  I know, I know it comes pre-loaded, but downloading Google Maps, Waze or any of the other competitors only takes a minute or two and maps, transit, etc., is so important to users that they wouldn't be sticking with Apple Maps if it wasn't meeting their needs.  I travel all around the country and need to be able to depend on my directions, so I have been running Google Maps and Apple Maps frequently side by side to check on Apple's progress.  By 2015 Apple Maps had improved so much that I have been able to rely on Apple Maps full time, though I occasionally still run them side by side to see if there are new features. Since Google is retaining everywhere you drive and linking it to a master file number on folks, I wouldn't ever go back to it full time, they do have two nice features, lane assist and speed limits, that fortuntately Apple is adding in iOS 11.  

  • Reply 10 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,254member
    Notsofast said:
    entropys said:
    Glaciers move faster than improvements to maps. You would think a key focus of criticism would have a heap of resources allocated to it. 
    Keep in mind that there are thousands of cities now covered by transit and hundreds of millions population in those areas.  Yes, Apple could have simply thrown the switch and imported all of the transit data at once, like Google did, but Google has been heavily criticized for the inaccuracy and other interface problems, so Apple wanted to avoid that and instead is going through the much more difficult route of customizing each area for transit.  It definitely is much more expensive and time consuming, but Apple has been receiving great reviews for its approach to transit.  The below article explains the difference in how Google and Apple have approached transit.

    http://http//appleinsider.com/articles/16/07/07/why-apples-transit-maps-are-rolling-out-so-slowly

    After a disaster of a rollout, Apple Maps has been improving steadily and has improved so much that usage is also growing steadily.  Most folks aren't aware that Apple Maps is now used many BILLIONS of times a week and is now used on Apple devices exponentially more than Google Maps, over 3 to 1.  I know, I know it comes pre-loaded, but downloading Google Maps, Waze or any of the other competitors only takes a minute or two and maps, transit, etc., is so important to users that they wouldn't be sticking with Apple Maps if it wasn't meeting their needs.  I travel all around the country and need to be able to depend on my directions, so I have been running Google Maps and Apple Maps frequently side by side to check on Apple's progress.  By 2015 Apple Maps had improved so much that I have been able to rely on Apple Maps full time, though I occasionally still run them side by side to see if there are new features. Since Google is retaining everywhere you drive and linking it to a master file number on folks, I wouldn't ever go back to it full time, they do have two nice features, lane assist and speed limits, that fortuntately Apple is adding in iOS 11.  

    Fixed link for you:  http://appleinsider.com/articles/16/07/07/why-apples-transit-maps-are-rolling-out-so-slowly
  • Reply 11 of 11
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member

    Still no public transit for Pahrump... Sigh!

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