Apple granted permission to renovate DC's Carnegie Library with 63,000 square foot store

Posted:
in General Discussion edited July 2017
Apple has been given the go-ahead to renovate the Carnegie Library in Washington D.C by the controlling group, and given the go-ahead to build a 63,000 square foot flagship retail location in the space.




On Thursday afternoon the official convention and sports authority for the District of Columbia, Events DC, announced that its Board of Directors and Apple have finalized terms of the renovation of the Carnegie Library, and renovations can begin.

"The partnership between Events DC and Apple demonstrates an innovative approach to preserving the historic character of our world-renowned Carnegie Library while creating a cultural experience that welcomes residents from across the District of Columbia and visitors around the world," said Mayor Muriel Bowser. "We look forward to the Carnegie Library re-opening its doors as a destination in DC's Other Mall - our thriving retail center in the central business district."

Apple is planning on more than just an interior renovation for retail. The company will outfit the location in accordance with Apple retail head Angela Ahrendt's vision of retail, and will host free concerts, art exhibits, and educational workshops in the space. The library's book collection will be relocated, and the space will hold Apple's "Genius Grove." Reading rooms will become product demonstration areas.

"This is a way of creating a reason to come to the store, to touch and feel our products, but also to have an engaging experience with someone who is passionate about the same thing," said Apple Retail's Senior Design Director B.J. Seigel. "For us, it wasn't about coming in and leaving our mark. It was about bringing the history back out and respecting it."

There is no timetable for the debut of the location to the public at this time.

In 1999 Congress granted $2 million and a 99-year lease to the Historical Society to use the Carnegie Library at Mt. Vernon Square, located across the street from the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, as a history museum about Washington, DC.

Events D.C., Washington D.C.'s sports and convention authority proposed a 10-year lease, with two five-year extensions in December 2016. Apple will allegedly pay market rent, as well as a sum between $1 million and $2 million to Events D.C. to compensate for any losses related to the Apple shop being in the space, versus the prior use of it.

The space said to be attributed to Apple's lease measures around 63,000 square feet. For the design project it has reportedly tapped frequent collaborator Foster + Partners, aiming to replicate ideas used at other Apple stores in London and San Francisco.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    As someone who goes into D.C. about twice a week, I really look forward to this opening.
    stanthemanjay3000
  • Reply 2 of 7
    jay3000jay3000 Posts: 21member
    This is very good news for me, this will be my closest Apple Store, also it is right next to a metro stop. This store will do very well!
  • Reply 3 of 7
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    This marks a cultural tsunami -- a changing of the guard from the world's biggest most successful corporation to the new world's biggest most successful corporation...

    In the 1890's Andrew Carnegie started building libraries that were meant to serve as community resources that included far more than 'just' books:  Many included meeting halls, concert halls, lecture halls, gymnasiums, swimming pools, etc... in order to serve those who had served his company....

    Today, Apple is moving into one of those spaces and redoing it in its own image.
    I so hope that they will respect the legacy that built the facility they are moving into...

    In Pittsburgh, the heart of the Carnegie and subsequent U.S. Steel corporation, after the decimation of the steel industry the city launched into a "Renovation" effort that focused on wiping out the vestiges of that great empire.   Today, barely a trace of it is left.  I hope the same does not occur with this library.  It is a vestige and a tangible reminder of the men and the industry that built modern day America.
  • Reply 4 of 7
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,527member
    This marks a cultural tsunami -- a changing of the guard from the world's biggest most successful corporation to the new world's biggest most successful corporation...

    In the 1890's Andrew Carnegie started building libraries that were meant to serve as community resources that included far more than 'just' books:  Many included meeting halls, concert halls, lecture halls, gymnasiums, swimming pools, etc... in order to serve those who had served his company....

    Today, Apple is moving into one of those spaces and redoing it in its own image.
    I so hope that they will respect the legacy that built the facility they are moving into...

    In Pittsburgh, the heart of the Carnegie and subsequent U.S. Steel corporation, after the decimation of the steel industry the city launched into a "Renovation" effort that focused on wiping out the vestiges of that great empire.   Today, barely a trace of it is left.  I hope the same does not occur with this library.  It is a vestige and a tangible reminder of the men and the industry that built modern day America.

    In 1979, while traveling for IBM, I had the opportunity to have dinner at a restaurant in the renovated P&LE Railroad Station.  It was a grand experience and the renovation preserved the ambience of the era of luxury train travel.

    My late wife, Lucy, came from Ambridge (downriver from Pittsburgh) which has suffered greatly from the decimation of the US steel industry...  So sad!
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 5 of 7
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    I dunno... adding trees to Apple Stores is really gilding the lily. Better to focus on more substantive improvements to the Genius Bar, shopping or purchase processes.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    I went to the Apple Store in NY's Grand Central Terminal, and didn't like it. It is very spread out around 3 sides of the mezzanine. Due to the layout, there are a lot of security guards watching everyone closely. I hated the vibe.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,317member
    I went to the Apple Store in NY's Grand Central Terminal, and didn't like it. It is very spread out around 3 sides of the mezzanine. Due to the layout, there are a lot of security guards watching everyone closely. I hated the vibe.
    But at night it is a magical place...my favorite Apple Store.  When in NYC I always stop by to see the crowds.  I have never noticed the guards.  To each his own.  I like how the store and the main atrium of the GC station are of a single piece and place.
    edited July 2017
Sign In or Register to comment.