Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about Swift curriculum during Austin tech incubator visit

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Apple CEO Tim Cook made an appearance at the Capital Factory tech incubator in Austin, Tex., on Friday, using the occasion to make the announcement that over 30 U.S. community college systems will start to offer Apple's 'App Development with Swift' curriculum in the 2017-2018 school year.




On his visit to Capital Factory, Cook confirmed the Austin Community College District was one of the college systems adopting the Swift curriculum. "Every student deserves the best we can give them," Cook told the audience.

Cook took a moment in the speech to pay a compliment to Austin Mayor Steve Adler, also in attendance, thanking him for his leadership. Claiming he and Apple shares Mayor Adler's values in diversity, the environment, and development, Cook said it was an honor to share the stage with him.



The curriculum is meant as a way to teach people who do not have any experience programming to produce their own fully-functional iOS app. The course centers around Swift, the open-source Apple-created language that is chiefly used to produce software on its own platforms.

Cook's trip to Austin, discovered on Thursday by an anonymous tip, follows after the CEO's visit to Des Moines, Iowa, announcing a $1.3 billion project to construct a 400,000 square foot data center. The tip also suggested there may be more announcements later today, including one relating to augmented reality (AR) projects.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    smaffeismaffei Posts: 203member
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
  • Reply 2 of 20
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    I think that is exactly what he is announcing. Let's begin formal computer science training at the community college level, or even earlier. You have to start somewhere and using Apple's curriculum is as good a place to start as any. 
    randominternetpersondewmeRacerhomieXpacificfilmRayz2016stanthemantallest skilmacxpressjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 20
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#

    I think the point is to use app development as a launching point for getting kids interested in software development (and STEM in general perhaps), not that the App Store so desperate for content that they are recruiting child labor.
    dewmepacificfilmstanthemanmacxpresswatto_cobratrackeroz
  • Reply 4 of 20
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,522member
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Hate to break it to ya — but much of the original Mac team had absolutely no Comp Sci university schooling. many were self-taught. it didn’t matter — being smart and able to get things done is what matters.

    recognizing this is what makes a good hire and a good hiring manager. in my opinion too many places just want to issues tests and trick story problems, all artificial measures of what we’re looking for but are easier to administer. especially by socially inept dev teams. 

    Joel on Software is a good ref for how not to be this way. i give it to all of my teams:

    https://www.amazon.com/Joel-Software-Occasionally-Developers-Designers/dp/1590593898
    edited August 2017 Solimretondomacky the mackydewmeRacerhomieXstanthemanmacxpresstmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 20
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,575member
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Programming isn't for everyone, so those really interested will eventually self-select anyway. It just broadens exposure to the basics for more people.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 20
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,752member
    Cook took a moment in the speech to pay a compliment to Austin Mayor Steve Adler, also in attendance, thanking him for his leadership. Claiming he and Apple shares Mayor Adler's values in diversity, the environment, and development, Cook said it was an honor to share the stage with him. 
    Did Cook say the same when he shared the stage with Iowa’s Republican Governor?
  • Reply 7 of 20
    Cook took a moment in the speech to pay a compliment to Austin Mayor Steve Adler, also in attendance, thanking him for his leadership. Claiming he and Apple shares Mayor Adler's values in diversity, the environment, and development, Cook said it was an honor to share the stage with him. 
    Did Cook say the same when he shared the stage with Iowa’s Republican Governor?
    He didn't say "the same" but he did say that he "wanted to be one of the first to congratulate her on her upcoming induction into the Iowa Women's Hall of Fame."  Both these events are friendly PR events that involve kissing up to relevant politicians.  I wouldn't read too much into exactly what words are used to stroke their egos.
    pacificfilmleavingthebiggwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,894member
    I know many AI readers are obsessed with the possibility that Tim may make a product announcement and are somewhat disappointed. However, in his role as Apple’s top executive he has to have a much broader and holistic perspective to the long term sustainment of Apple and its place in the larger technology marketplace. This announcement is a prime example of how Apple and Tim Cook are providing thoughtful and pragmatic leadership in areas that will ensure the workforce of tomorrow has the needed education and skills to be successful and serve the current and future needs of the nation. The jobs that require people with the skills Tim is supporting are exactly the kinds of jobs that will power the American economy as more and more traditional factory, mining, construction, accounting, and manual labor jobs are performed by automation and AI. Automation will only continue to expand and evolve so you’d better prepare yourself and have the skills that will put you on the winning side of the automation equation.  
    pacificfilmRacerhomieXStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 20
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Hate to break it to ya — but much of the original Mac team had absolutely no Comp Sci university schooling. many were self-taught. it didn’t matter — being smart and able to get things done is what matters.

    Hate to break it to ya, but the original Mac software (now called "Classic macOS") was barely stable because of that fact, something Jobs came to be very keenly aware of as he developed NeXT, Mac OS X and iOS. Developing anything for that "stuff" required what came to be known as "organic knowledge" --lots of undocumented bugs making it virtually impossible for all but the most determined (and well financed) professional developers to embrace the platform. There was this one guy (Steve Jasik) who must have made a small fortune just selling "The Debugger" for it. We would have lost the Cold War if our country had depended on that "stuff" like it came to depend on NeXT and other Unix, IBM and DEC environments, but for producing low-profit apps for use by home computers and small businesses, it couldn't be beat.
    edited August 2017 randominternetpersontmay
  • Reply 10 of 20
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Programming isn't for everyone, so those really interested will eventually self-select anyway. It just broadens exposure to the basics for more people.
    Besides, it can't hurt to be exposed to some form of logical reasoning. The same sort of thinking that deduced the structure of the atom, or launched the Voyager probes. Our society sure could use a healthy dose of logic right about now. 
    pacificfilmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 20
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Hate to break it to ya — but much of the original Mac team had absolutely no Comp Sci university schooling. many were self-taught. it didn’t matter — being smart and able to get things done is what matters.

    recognizing this is what makes a good hire and a good hiring manager. in my opinion too many places just want to issues tests and trick story problems, all artificial measures of what we’re looking for but are easier to administer. especially by socially inept dev teams. 

    Joel on Software is a good ref for how not to be this way. i give it to all of my teams:

    https://www.amazon.com/Joel-Software-Occasionally-Developers-Designers/dp/1590593898
    Burrell Smith who designed the first Mac's logic board was an Apple II service technician. I'm not aware of him having any formal education in engineering.
    StrangeDaystmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 20
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,522member
    Cook took a moment in the speech to pay a compliment to Austin Mayor Steve Adler, also in attendance, thanking him for his leadership. Claiming he and Apple shares Mayor Adler's values in diversity, the environment, and development, Cook said it was an honor to share the stage with him. 
    Did Cook say the same when he shared the stage with Iowa’s Republican Governor?
    No because they don't share those values, as you know. 
    montrosemacswatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 20
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,522member
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Hate to break it to ya — but much of the original Mac team had absolutely no Comp Sci university schooling. many were self-taught. it didn’t matter — being smart and able to get things done is what matters.

    Hate to break it to ya, but the original Mac software (now called "Classic macOS") was barely stable because of that fact, something Jobs came to be very keenly aware of as he developed NeXT, Mac OS X and iOS. Developing anything for that "stuff" required what came to be known as "organic knowledge" --lots of undocumented bugs making it virtually impossible for all but the most determined (and well financed) professional developers to embrace the platform. There was this one guy (Steve Jasik) who must have made a small fortune just selling "The Debugger" for it. We would have lost the Cold War if our country had depended on that "stuff" like it came to depend on NeXT and other Unix, IBM and DEC environments, but for producing low-profit apps for use by home computers and small businesses, it couldn't be beat.
    The System X releases you're referring to came after the original Macintosh's OS. The original Macintosh was a marvel of engineering and system design, and was devised by a very creative and smart gang. 

    As the platform expanded so did the bugs. Some argued that Apple was becoming too corporate and staffed by inept managers who didn't understand why more lines of
    code was a lousy measure for employee productivity. 

    You can read all about it here from the people in the room:

    https://www.folklore.org/

    Then I recommend you read Joel on Software. Smart people, who get things done.

    (full disclosure: i'm a fortune 100 enterprise developer, manager, and former dot com'er who has no com sci background. but but but...)
    edited August 2017 alandailwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 20
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,575member
    hexclock said:
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Programming isn't for everyone, so those really interested will eventually self-select anyway. It just broadens exposure to the basics for more people.
    Besides, it can't hurt to be exposed to some form of logical reasoning. The same sort of thinking that deduced the structure of the atom, or launched the Voyager probes. Our society sure could use a healthy dose of logic right about now. 
    Societies aren't logical. Mobs act emotionally. Individuals, on the other hand, act logically. I have far more confidence in individuals.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 20
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    smaffei said:
    Yes, let's make more apps from people who actually have no formal Comp Sci training. Yeah, those will be stable.  :#
    Tell me, have you ever heard of a chap called Keith Blount? He's the former teacher who wanted to be a writer. He didn't like Word, or any other word processor for that matter, so he taught himself ObjectiveC and wrote Scrivener. 

    Unfortunately, he no longer has time to write his novel…

    You don't need a formal computer science education to be a top-flight developer. If I'm looking for a free starter, I'd be more interested in what the person does in their spare time, and I'd probably pick a Physics bod over a computer scientist. 

    Oh, and Scrivener is rock-solid stable. 
    edited August 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 20
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member

    Timmy didn't say a word when he met with Trump...


    Jesus, is that a real picture?? 

    That is the face of man who really wants to be somewhere else. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 20
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,724member
    Rayz2016 said:

    Timmy didn't say a word when he met with Trump...


    Jesus, is that a real picture?? 

    That is the face of man who really wants to be somewhere else. 
    Yes its a real photo...AppleInsider uses this photo all the time. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 20
    dewme said:
    I know many AI readers are obsessed with the possibility that Tim may make a product announcement and are somewhat disappointed. However, in his role as Apple’s top executive he has to have a much broader and holistic perspective to the long term sustainment of Apple and its place in the larger technology marketplace. This announcement is a prime example of how Apple and Tim Cook are providing thoughtful and pragmatic leadership in areas that will ensure the workforce of tomorrow has the needed education and skills to be successful and serve the current and future needs of the nation. The jobs that require people with the skills Tim is supporting are exactly the kinds of jobs that will power the American economy as more and more traditional factory, mining, construction, accounting, and manual labor jobs are performed by automation and AI. Automation will only continue to expand and evolve so you’d better prepare yourself and have the skills that will put you on the winning side of the automation equation.  
    It was AppleInsider that hyped the possibility of an AR announcement before deciding to edit the title of an article to remove the AR announcement reference. IMHO, many AI readers weren't expecting a product announcement so close to an iPhone announcement.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    dewme said:
    I know many AI readers are obsessed with the possibility that Tim may make a product announcement and are somewhat disappointed. However, in his role as Apple’s top executive he has to have a much broader and holistic perspective to the long term sustainment of Apple and its place in the larger technology marketplace. This announcement is a prime example of how Apple and Tim Cook are providing thoughtful and pragmatic leadership in areas that will ensure the workforce of tomorrow has the needed education and skills to be successful and serve the current and future needs of the nation. The jobs that require people with the skills Tim is supporting are exactly the kinds of jobs that will power the American economy as more and more traditional factory, mining, construction, accounting, and manual labor jobs are performed by automation and AI. Automation will only continue to expand and evolve so you’d better prepare yourself and have the skills that will put you on the winning side of the automation equation.  
    It was AppleInsider that hyped the possibility of an AR announcement before deciding to edit the title of an article to remove the AR announcement reference. IMHO, many AI readers weren't expecting a product announcement so close to an iPhone announcement.
    Those were good times. Anytime the modifiers "may", "might", "could" appear in a headline, I just assume they're trying to make a mountain out of a molehill.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,131member
    I like Swift for the brief time i've spent with it but if I'm talking to a 18 year old kid and they want to learn something I'm recommending Javascript and the bajillion libraries and frameworks. 


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