Comparing iPhone 8 charging speeds with fast charge, wireless and more

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,029member
    A bit off topic, but I would love to know if Apple throttles any of it's charging based on the temperature of the device? 

    I've definitely been through warm situations (a week in Italy) where my battery seemed to fry itself.   (I generally always travel with a 12w charger), Have seen this with a 6, 6s, and 7+..  Theory is apple doesn't slow down charging speed based on the temp of the battery.  And this allows the battery to fry itself shortening it's lifespan..  

    Also not helping is any form of case holding heat in while charging.  

    Quick search shows 45C is a likely max battery temp during charging..  I've definitely had my phone exceed that...

    https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/262917/how-hot-can-a-lithium-ion-battery-safely-get-while-charging

    Apple has always monitored the temp of the battery, they have been doing it since the first PowerBook. Temp has always been a critical part of the battery charging and maintaining the useful life of the battery. I know the past Apple iPhone battery packs had at circuit in the battery pack which communicates with the phone, this is also why the connection to from the battery to the phone has more than two pins. Just charging the phone will not cause the phone to get that hot. I heard of people who had their phone in the car with the sun beating down on the phone heating it up and charging it at the same time and running an App like Waze cause the phone to get hot and then the battery stops charging.

    I think you would need to be more specific about what you were doing than to say it got very hot.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 32
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,029member
    Nice job on the article, It make it very clear what is going on with each set up. I guess if you really need to charge your phone quickly it is going to cost you $70. Have to give apple credit, they know which features customer are willing to pay more for.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 32
    fmalloyfmalloy Posts: 105member
    foggyhill said:
    That's undoubtedly why Apple still ships the Iphone with a 5w charger.
    I'd say it's more about maximizing margins.
  • Reply 24 of 32
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    fmalloy said:
    foggyhill said:
    That's undoubtedly why Apple still ships the Iphone with a 5w charger.
    I'd say it's more about maximizing margins.
    The differences in margin would be very small, but the difference in bitching as the battery fails earlier would be large and THAT would affect margin a lot more as people may switch away from the iPhone. 

    So,  right but not in the way you think you are. Product design is balancing many things, user satisfaction is also linked to profit. 
    Your average sales price going down because you produce crappy failing products affects revenues and profits more than saving a few cents on the bom for this charger.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 32
    singularitysingularity Posts: 1,328member
    fmalloy said:
    foggyhill said:
    That's undoubtedly why Apple still ships the Iphone with a 5w charger.
    I'd say it's more about maximizing margins.
    The 5w charger will be good enough fir the majority but gives an opportunity to upsell to those who want a faster option. For Apple it's a win win situation.
  • Reply 26 of 32
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
     
    I often plug my iPhone 6 into my iPad charger to get as much charge as popsicle when getting ready to head out the door.  It does charge noticeably faster, but I don’t know by how much.
    Just so you know, the blue popsicles have more energy than the red ones due to wavelengths or something.  Either way, they keep your phone cooler too but can get a bit sticky.
  • Reply 27 of 32
    THE_RoenTHE_Roen Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    "Before looking at the results, it should be noted that there is no material difference in charging speed between Apple's 29W and 87W USB-C chargers. If you're buying an Apple branded charger specifically to charge your iPhone, save some money and go with the 29W version."

    This article is reckless. Both the 61W and the 87W don't contain the required 14.5V (or 15V) / 2A rail to support 29W charging. In fact, the 61W and the 87W will only charge the iPhone 8 at 18W.
    m0dest
  • Reply 28 of 32
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,032member
    Since the AI staff seems to read the forums more frequently I'm going to post this here instead of sending a private email...

    I loved seeing all the different change times for the iPhone 8, but there are a couple additions I'd like to see in a follow up article:

    1. Instead of the line graph it would be helpful to have a grid that details the time to 50%, 80%, and 100%, for example, Seeing these listed as numbers is much easier to read for many viewers.
    2. I'd love to know the power draw to get to these different competition times for a given device model. For example, the iPhone 8 takes about as long to charge with the included adapter as the Wi charging pad, but how much additional power does the Qi charger require because of having to switch to inductive charging for transmitting energy?
    Thank you.
  • Reply 29 of 32
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,072member
    foggyhill said:
    fmalloy said:
    foggyhill said:
    That's undoubtedly why Apple still ships the Iphone with a 5w charger.
    I'd say it's more about maximizing margins.
    The differences in margin would be very small, but the difference in bitching as the battery fails earlier would be large and THAT would affect margin a lot more as people may switch away from the iPhone. 

    So,  right but not in the way you think you are. Product design is balancing many things, user satisfaction is also linked to profit. 
    Your average sales price going down because you produce crappy failing products affects revenues and profits more than saving a few cents on the bom for this charger.
    Except that Apple generates Great Profit through Great Products -- not the other way around.  
    ...  Once Apple makes profit their primary concern, they will become just another HP or Microsoft.
  • Reply 30 of 32
    Would love to this in table format across the full line-up of on-sale iPhones, from SE to X.  Obviously there‘d be some N/A entries in that table, but it’d be great to see them all compared.
    Awesome article! I would also really appreciate data on older iPhone models as I'm trying to build my own universal charger and I haven't been able to find good data.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    THE_Roen said:
    "Before looking at the results, it should be noted that there is no material difference in charging speed between Apple's 29W and 87W USB-C chargers. If you're buying an Apple branded charger specifically to charge your iPhone, save some money and go with the 29W version."

    This article is reckless. Both the 61W and the 87W don't contain the required 14.5V (or 15V) / 2A rail to support 29W charging. In fact, the 61W and the 87W will only charge the iPhone 8 at 18W.

    I came to point out the same thing.  It's unfortunate that this was reported here, as other article have cited AppleInsider's advice about the 61W and 87W adapters.

    I did a couple of basic tests with the iPhone X, but nothing conclusive.
    • When plugged into Apple's 29W USB-C power supply, the iPhone X uses the 14.5V charging protocol, but appears to charge at ~0.88 A.  So it charges at 12.8 W.
    • When plugged into Apple's 87W USB-C power supply, the iPhone X uses the 9V charging protocol, but appears to charge at ~1.33 A.  So it charges at 12.0 W.
    Take these current measurements with a grain of salt, as I haven't gotten a chance to do a sustained test.  In this case, the battery was already charged to 60%, so higher current might be used in other situations (like when charging from 0%).
  • Reply 32 of 32
    EagleglenEagleglen Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Great comparison.  Can you update this with the new ‘fast wireless charging’ capability that was introduced in iOS 11.2 beta 3?  It would also be helpful to refer to the wireless charging method you used here as 5W wireless, because even though you used a wireless charger capable of providing 7.5W, the iPhone was not accepting it at the time.  
    edited November 2017
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