Tim Cook talks economy, education in 45-minute conversation with French President Emmanuel...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 2017
Apple CEO Tim Cook's audience with French President Emmanuel Macron has concluded, with the pair reportedly discussing education, taxation, and the global economy over the course of the meeting.




Macron and Cook also discussed French suppliers, and how relationships can be improved. While the discussion about taxes was reportedly "constructive" -- both ultimately conceded that applicable tax reform would be enacted by the European Union, and not individual nations.

The French leader is on record regarding his view that Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Apple don't contribute sufficiently to countries that they do business in -- including France.

Macron and Cook also reportedly discussed a possible presence in "Station F" -- the world's largest startup incubator located in Paris. Apple's educational initiatives were briefly addressed -- but details on what was discussed regarding the subject are not clear.

The meeting was the first between the pair. Macron has already met with the chief executives of Cisco, Facebook, and Google.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,039member
    The us need to allow Apple to bring all that money back home so Apple can spend it here verse other places which generally do not help the US when the US has issues.
  • Reply 2 of 3
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,516member
    maestro64 said:
    The us need to allow Apple to bring all that money back home so Apple can spend it here verse other places which generally do not help the US when the US has issues.
    Apple could do that whenever they had wanted to, but there are zero plans to do under any foreseeable circumstances. Apple has stipulated in their financials that the majority of their profits are considered permanently invested "overseas" (!), and not ever to be subject to US corporate income taxes.

    But in a bit of a surprise twist Apple's Tim Cook has apparently accepted that Apple may have to pay taxes in the countries in which the sale or service occurred. 

    Bloomberg reports that Cook appears to no longer be interested in fighting this battle.

    Macron’s office said the two didn’t discuss past tax disputes, but Cook accepted that fiscal laws worldwide are shifting toward making companies pay tax where money is actually earned.

Sign In or Register to comment.