How to: turn off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on iPhone and iPad in iOS 11

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 59
    It’s perplexing that even people on this forum believe they should disable bluetooth while using a wired carplay connection. As if disabling bluetooth for the duration of their trip offered some advantage. One needn’t manually manage bluetooth in iOS for perceived battery gains. 
    SolistompyRayz2016
  • Reply 42 of 59
    Nothing quite like having Bluetooth and WiFi turned off and walking by a store in a mall and getting the beacon triggered welcome when you have not even stepped inside.

    Shame on you, Apple. Off should mean really, totally off. Not kind of.
    muthuk_vanalingamdysamoria
  • Reply 43 of 59
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,368member
    Lone voice in the desert apparently, but I actually like the new behaviour..

    When I want to disable Wifi or Bluetooth it is almost always only temporarily, for instance because the Wifi network I am on has bad connectivity.. Meaning I switch to mobile data.. That iOS11 now reconnects me as soon as another network it knows is in reach is a good thing..

    One thing less to worry about..
    I can see why they did it, and that it's useful for some use-cases. But, it's still bad UI. It should be some other button, or a mode you can choose in the settings (not the default).

    charlesgres said:
    Euh.. because hands-free uses Bluetooth?
    It shouldn't have to. I can manually answer a call and set it to speaker-phone. What if I don't have Bluetooth or don't want to use it?

    longfang said:
    Is there really any need beyond boarding an aircraft to turn off the radios?
    To save battery life, or when you're in public places and you don't want it connecting to WiFi.

    axcoatl said:
    ... if you are a SIRI User, why not just switch on and off WLAN connectivity with a Siri command. works for Bluetooth, too.
    I typically have Siri turned off when the device is locked. Also, in general, I don't find Siri very helpful or like talking to my device. And, when I most need Siri, it either doesn't work for what I need (like in the car), or I can't remember the syntax for the voice command it's expecting. It's a cool party trick kind of thing though, or helpful for trivial pursuit.

    Soli said:
    While I understand that you're having trouble understanding Apple's reasoning for having the Apple Watch, Instant Hotspot, Apple Pencil, and Continuity features, like Handoff stay connected, you need to accept that they didn't make this decision lightly...
    Yes, they wanted to accomplish what they wanted to, good UI/UX be damned. That seems to be a popular trend lately. Why do I need 'Apple Watch, Instant Hotspot, Apple Pencil, and Continuity' to be the default, even if I don't use those things? I'd much rather have a UI element work like it's supposed to and expected to. Innovate a bit and find another way to accomplish those goals.
    muthuk_vanalingamdysamoria
  • Reply 44 of 59
    Hasn't Apple just missed the obvious? If the new meaning of the buttons is 'disconnect devices but leave the radios active' then why not then show the button as amber for 'not fully working' rather than grey that we've all learned means 'off'? I think we're all sufficiently used to amber as a "partly red" state to get the implication.

    The Airplane mode button turns off transmitters in accordance with aviation rules. The fact the regulations are changing causes the confusion: the overall regulations now allow Bluetooth to be used but the final decision lies with individual airlines and some have not chosen to permit Bluetooth usage. You may wonder why some airlines' aircraft are more susceptible to interference than others...

    GPS, contrary to many implications in the popular press, is a receive-only system. All the amazing maths and timing is done inside the iPhone or other device, hence the GPS system also doesn't know where you are. The concern with airliners is interference so it's devices deliberately generating signals with significant power (i.e. transmitters) that are a concern; a receive-only system has no transmitter.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 45 of 59
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,368member
    command_f said:
    Hasn't Apple just missed the obvious? If the new meaning of the buttons is 'disconnect devices but leave the radios active' then why not then show the button as amber for 'not fully working' rather than grey that we've all learned means 'off'? I think we're all sufficiently used to amber as a "partly red" state to get the implication.
    ...
    GPS, contrary to many implications in the popular press, is a receive-only system. All the amazing maths and timing is done inside the iPhone or other device, hence the GPS system also doesn't know where you are. The concern with airliners is interference so it's devices deliberately generating signals with significant power (i.e. transmitters) that are a concern; a receive-only system has no transmitter.
    I'd rather have the 3-state button with appropriate colors than what they have now. But, I also agree with Soli (comment #40) that there are problems with that approach as well.

    re: GPS - while it probably wouldn't be an actual issue... go read GG1's excellent response (comment #37). There is actually a signal being produced (likely properly shielded)... and this would be the case even with the phone itself to some extent just being on and operating.
  • Reply 46 of 59
    @CgWerks: Sure, should you not be willing to use Siri, this would not be helpful to you.

    But the syntax itself is easy: Activate Siri and say just ‚WLAN‘ (this will show you the WLAN settings, where you could switch on or off WLAN), or try ‚Switch off WLAN‘.

    ... same with Bluetooth.

    ___
    The German command for Siri is: „Deaktiviere WLAN“ and „Deaktiviere Bluetooth“ OR „Schalte WLAN aus/ein“.

     


    edited October 2017
  • Reply 47 of 59
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,368member
    axcoatl said:
    @CgWerks: Sure, should you not be willing to use Siri, this would not be helpful to you.

    But the syntax itself is easy: Activate Siri and say just ‚WLAN‘ (this will show you the WLAN settings, where you could switch on or off WLAN), or try ‚Switch off WLAN‘.

    ... same with Bluetooth.

    ___
    The German command for Siri is: „Deaktiviere WLAN“ and „Deaktiviere Bluetooth“ OR „Schalte WLAN aus/ein“.

    It isn't so much that I'm unwilling to use Siri, but that I don't often find it useful enough to bother with. In this case, I think it would be faster to just go to Settings (for me). If you have Siri always available or the phone is unlocked, and your hands are dirty or something, I guess this would be nice.
  • Reply 48 of 59
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,706member
    misa said:
    sdw2001 said:
    I didn’t think this was a huge deal at first, but god damn, it is annoying.  I turn Bluetooth off a lot in the car due wired CarPlay.  I noticed two days ago that it was back on.  I then remembered how dumb the control center situation was.  I can obviously go into settings, but that’s kind of annoying when I need to turn it back on.  Dumb.  Apple needs to fix it.  

    The unfortunate problem is that "user friendliness" often outfavors security. To give you an example, on Windows, if you have a Laptop tied to your microsoft account, you CAN NOT LOGIN TO THE LAPTOP WITHOUT INTERNET CONNECTIVITY. Like what genius decided that was a good idea? So this annoying security feature means that the laptop stays off while I travel because clearly there is no way to turn it on while I'm on an airplane.

    Compare that to how iOS/MacOS works, where the account is not dependent on authenticating online, yet the iCloud data is available no matter which iOS/MacOS device you use.

    This idea of iOS/MacOS never being completely off means that in theory you should never lose sync with your devices. The catch is that you have no control over metered connections over WiFi or Bluetooth. I logged into my Windows laptop while the iPhone was somehow still connected via bluetooth and burned through the entire data cap in 30 minutes.


    I wouldn't call this user-friendliness at all. It's the excuse being made by Apple who wants to reduce support calls. It's a sledge hammer solution to an information problem, which is worsened by a bad GUI design.
  • Reply 49 of 59
    cgWerks said:
    re: GPS - while it probably wouldn't be an actual issue... go read GG1's excellent response (comment #37). There is actually a signal being produced (likely properly shielded)... and this would be the case even with the phone itself to some extent just being on and operating.
    Yes, not an issue as you say. There's no power amp behind it, nor any (intentional) antenna, plus I expect that it's shielded to reduce mutual interference within the device. All this means that any stray signal will be tiny. Combine that with power drop-off (inverse square of the distance) to any susceptible part of the aircraft and you have no meaningful signal. Translation: nothing compared to an intentional transmitter.

    I worked with a team looking at GSM phones on airliners 15+ years ago; they had research that showed even then that the only susceptible devices were the smoke detectors in the toilets (and remember that the cellular transmitters in the phone are the big-hitters in power terms). The transmitter ban is the aviation industry being very conservative (and rightly so).
    cgWerksGG1
  • Reply 50 of 59
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,706member
    cgWerks said:
    Other than maybe the flashlight, these settings are about the only reason I use Control Center. So, Apple basically just removed that feature for me and put me back into the days of Settings -> Wifi (Bluetooth) -> on/off. Gee, thanks Apple.
    Same here. It's the only user-facing feature in the iOS 7 era that I found of use to me (I hate everything else about the UI that is unique to iOS 7+). The only thing left on there for me is brightness and DND.
  • Reply 51 of 59
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,368member
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. It's the only user-facing feature in the iOS 7 era that I found of use to me (I hate everything else about the UI that is unique to iOS 7+). The only thing left on there for me is brightness and DND.
    There are features here and there over the last few years that I'm grateful for, but a huge number of them (both on iOS and macOS) have gone unused for me. And, that wouldn't be so bad, if there weren't the need of attention to core technologies (mostly macOS) or even adding missing features that seem obvious (ex: you still can't duplicate an event in Calendar on iOS... so for years now, I have to wait until I get home to my Mac to do that kind of thing).
  • Reply 52 of 59
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,706member
    command_f said:
    Hasn't Apple just missed the obvious? If the new meaning of the buttons is 'disconnect devices but leave the radios active' then why not then show the button as amber for 'not fully working' rather than grey that we've all learned means 'off'? I think we're all sufficiently used to amber as a "partly red" state to get the implication.

    The Airplane mode button turns off transmitters in accordance with aviation rules. The fact the regulations are changing causes the confusion: the overall regulations now allow Bluetooth to be used but the final decision lies with individual airlines and some have not chosen to permit Bluetooth usage. You may wonder why some airlines' aircraft are more susceptible to interference than others...

    GPS, contrary to many implications in the popular press, is a receive-only system. All the amazing maths and timing is done inside the iPhone or other device, hence the GPS system also doesn't know where you are. The concern with airliners is interference so it's devices deliberately generating signals with significant power (i.e. transmitters) that are a concern; a receive-only system has no transmitter.
    A third state for a button is just complicating things for the user. On and off is what most people expect. ACTUALLY off is the state for off that people expect. 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 53 of 59
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,706member
    One needn’t manually manage bluetooth in iOS for perceived battery gains. 
    Because it's not "perceived". It's actual. I don't want my pencil waking and communicating with my iPad every time it gets jostled on my end table where I am constantly setting down and picking up my phone and water bottle. I also don't want my iPad wasting battery responding to it.

    As for while driving... that's up to the user, not Apple. Frankly, I'd rather use USB connections in the car because Bluetooth sucks for audio (dropouts and pitch shifting are unacceptable for a music playback device!!). The only reason I use Bluetooth in my car at all is that the USB support of the Mazda system is piss poor (slow to connect, slow to browse). Though Bluetooth mode doesn't show album art while USB mode does. It's most more of the same BS with computer tech being developed halfway and left to rot. I'm sick of this state of computer industry development.
  • Reply 54 of 59
    GG1GG1 Posts: 167member
    command_f said:
    cgWerks said:
    re: GPS - while it probably wouldn't be an actual issue... go read GG1's excellent response (comment #37). There is actually a signal being produced (likely properly shielded)... and this would be the case even with the phone itself to some extent just being on and operating.
    Yes, not an issue as you say. There's no power amp behind it, nor any (intentional) antenna, plus I expect that it's shielded to reduce mutual interference within the device. All this means that any stray signal will be tiny. Combine that with power drop-off (inverse square of the distance) to any susceptible part of the aircraft and you have no meaningful signal. Translation: nothing compared to an intentional transmitter.

    I worked with a team looking at GSM phones on airliners 15+ years ago; they had research that showed even then that the only susceptible devices were the smoke detectors in the toilets (and remember that the cellular transmitters in the phone are the big-hitters in power terms). The transmitter ban is the aviation industry being very conservative (and rightly so).
    Good info on cellphone (non-)interference. That makes me suspect that the cellphone companies may have a lot of influence to continue to use airplane mode (for the cellular portion). If a cellphone on the ground can be seen by 2+ towers at a time, a cellphone in the air can be seen by a lot more towers. Then think about a plane moving 10+ times faster than a car on a highway. It's not difficult to realize that the towers can get clogged quickly, although there may be mitigation techniques around this situation.
  • Reply 55 of 59
    Nothing quite like having Bluetooth and WiFi turned off and walking by a store in a mall and getting the beacon triggered welcome when you have not even stepped inside.

    Shame on you, Apple. Off should mean really, totally off. Not kind of.
    Exactly. I have poor service in my home area and constantly switching airplane mode on and off to make phone search for service to enable better connection. With iOS 11 every time I toggle airplane mode on and off it automatically turns on WiFi and Bluetooth.  If I wanted either on I’m quite capable of switching them on. Battery life I’m not concerned with. Privacy I’m very much concerned with. Can some one or Apple please tell me how to disable this option 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 56 of 59
    dysamoria said:
    misa said:
    sdw2001 said:
    I didn’t think this was a huge deal at first, but god damn, it is annoying.  I turn Bluetooth off a lot in the car due wired CarPlay.  I noticed two days ago that it was back on.  I then remembered how dumb the control center situation was.  I can obviously go into settings, but that’s kind of annoying when I need to turn it back on.  Dumb.  Apple needs to fix it.  

    The unfortunate problem is that "user friendliness" often outfavors security. To give you an example, on Windows, if you have a Laptop tied to your microsoft account, you CAN NOT LOGIN TO THE LAPTOP WITHOUT INTERNET CONNECTIVITY. Like what genius decided that was a good idea? So this annoying security feature means that the laptop stays off while I travel because clearly there is no way to turn it on while I'm on an airplane.

    Compare that to how iOS/MacOS works, where the account is not dependent on authenticating online, yet the iCloud data is available no matter which iOS/MacOS device you use.

    This idea of iOS/MacOS never being completely off means that in theory you should never lose sync with your devices. The catch is that you have no control over metered connections over WiFi or Bluetooth. I logged into my Windows laptop while the iPhone was somehow still connected via bluetooth and burned through the entire data cap in 30 minutes.


    I wouldn't call this user-friendliness at all. It's the excuse being made by Apple who wants to reduce support calls. It's a sledge hammer solution to an information problem, which is worsened by a bad GUI design.
    Yeah why don’t you prove that instead of making shit up and pretending it’s true? Your crackpot lies about a company you barely understand are perplexing. 
    edited October 2017
  • Reply 57 of 59

    dysamoria said:
    One needn’t manually manage bluetooth in iOS for perceived battery gains. 
    Because it's not "perceived". It's actual. I don't want my pencil waking and communicating with my iPad every time it gets jostled on my end table where I am constantly setting down and picking up my phone and water bottle. I also don't want my iPad wasting battery responding to it.

    As for while driving... that's up to the user, not Apple. Frankly, I'd rather use USB connections in the car because Bluetooth sucks for audio (dropouts and pitch shifting are unacceptable for a music playback device!!). The only reason I use Bluetooth in my car at all is that the USB support of the Mazda system is piss poor (slow to connect, slow to browse). Though Bluetooth mode doesn't show album art while USB mode does. It's most more of the same BS with computer tech being developed halfway and left to rot. I'm sick of this state of computer industry development.
     Nope, it’s perceived — the actual facts are you don’t need to disable BT out of the concern that leaving it enabled is using up battery life. You’re just making more things up and pretending they’re true. In iOS you don’t need to manually turn off BT to try to save battery. 
  • Reply 58 of 59
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 18,603member
    Mork said:


    The last time I checked GPS was a “radio” and it is NOT disabled when you turn on Airplane Mode.
    GPS is only a receiver, doesn’t transmit so technically doesn’t matter, airplane mode turns off transmission.


    On my iPad with 11.1 beta, this seems to be ‘fixed’ the control Center actually does turn off these things, not sure if it is only my iPad or not, I’m not game enough to beta my iPhone again after iOS 11 beta 3 bricked it, had to hold down the usual buttons to reset to ‘iTunes’ mode and rebuild as new, ( I was unlucky my laptop with backup was at home and I was on a flight, used a friends laptop to reset)
    You are correct on the GPS part. But nowadays we have 4 types of 'navigation radios'. One of them is two-way (supporting SaR); Galileo:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_(satellite_navigation)

    OT, and only applies to Japan: The fourth Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) was launched just two days ago, on October 10, 2017.
    https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/

    Nice research PhilBoogie. +1
  • Reply 59 of 59
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,368member
    StrangeDays said:
    Nope, it’s perceived — the actual facts are you don’t need to disable BT out of the concern that leaving it enabled is using up battery life. You’re just making more things up and pretending they’re true. In iOS you don’t need to manually turn off BT to try to save battery. 
    Baloney. When Apple says things are magic, that's just a figure of speech. You do know what a figure of speech is, right? Just like Apple says you don't have to manually 'quit' apps and all that kind of marketing fluff.
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