iPhone X review: Apple's Face ID vision for the future of iOS

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 96
    foggyhill said:
    fmalloy said:
    "When Samsung copied Apple's early iPhone designs," Apple doesn't copy in this case - they just pay Samsung directly for their OLED displays, which Apple cannot design or manufacture.
    Well, since seemingly it's better than the one in Samsung's own phone, Apple must be doing something in hardware and software in regards to this panel.
    Other alternative is
    Maybe they're just asking Samsung to bin the panel (filter) and buying the best ones, better even than what Samsung is willing to put in their own phones at their price point. Considering the price they pay Samsung and the price of the product, that seems likely.

    Articles said it’s a custom screen for Apple, paired with an Apple driver component. It’s not the exact same display system found in samsung phones. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 96
    FolioFolio Posts: 263member
    Thank you. Nice mix of how-to, tech, and aesthetics (like detail on the window edge). Geez, I may have to spring for the X sooner now. Loving my new iPadPro, which gratifies me daily, the $1100 price a distant memory.
    watto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 43 of 96
    fmalloy said:
    "When Samsung copied Apple's early iPhone designs," Apple doesn't copy in this case - they just pay Samsung directly for their OLED displays, which Apple cannot design or manufacture.
    Sorry to put a crimp in the snark, but Apple designed the display, Sammy is just the manufacturer. No other company can simply buy the display off the shelf. Just like you can't buy an A11 Chip off the shelf.
    brucemcStrangeDayswatto_cobraLukeCageargonaut
  • Reply 44 of 96
    $1300 is a hell of a lot of money for your average Joe or Jane.  

    Here's an idea:

    I bought the iPhone X on the Apple IUP -- pay the tax and first payment up front -- finance the rest at 0% interest.  I took the rest of the $1300 and bought AAPL shares...

    I suspect that in 1 or 2 years I will have a resalable iPhone X plus a tidy profit in my stock investment.
    radarthekatuniscapeargonaut
  • Reply 45 of 96


    I found the article useful and informative, if verbose.

    IMO, DED should avoid the hyperbole and the temptation to disparage the competition at every opportunity:

    AppleInsider said:
    iPhone X isn't aspiring to look like an angular techie robot on a mission to monetize everyone's content with advertising messages or a square panel of "live tile" TV boxes seeking to impose licensing taxes on the enterprise. 

    You should read the parts I cut out. 
    Touché
    radarthekat
  • Reply 46 of 96
    fmalloy said:

    Apple has an incredible knack for offering up anything as "the next big thing" and people just eat it up. It's made them very, very rich. It certainly worked on you.
    But it is ... the next big thing, I mean.

    What Apple has created here is the next big thing: Passive Biometric Authentication.

    With PBA, the iPhone X makes the pain points of security dissipate the instant you pick up the phone and start to use it. It's the reason that Android and other handset makers will have to copy it, even if it's expensive - even if they don't understand why they have to copy it. They follow Apple for a reason, even if that reason doesn't rise to the level of consciousness for a long while.

    You copy from the smart kid even if you don't know why.

    Here's your workflow: you pick up your phone and start to use it. The first thing it demands is that you unlock it. You give it your fingerprint or iris scan (or whatever biometric authentication you use to avoid having to enter that complex passcode everyone says you need). You use an app or a website and it demands your password. You open your password vault (I use 1password), and it either demands your master passcode or offers you biometric authentication, to gain entrance to a room you've erected in case someone picks up or has borrowed your phone (you don't want just any Tom, Dick, or Jerry to see your passwords). So you authenticate that using your iris scanner or thumbprint on a sensor pad to get the password you needed. You use your smart scale and want to see the stats. It wants a passcode/authentication. Your drug store app. Your blood sugar tracking app. I have ssh and vnc apps which can connect to a number of servers at work without needing to remember authentication credentials - you probably have something similar, and have to authenticate that. Your Quicken or investment app.

    Everywhere where you've installed heightened security to protect an area of secrecy or critical information is a security pain-point you have to deal with. Until iPhone X.

    With iPhone X and passive biometric authentication, I open 1password. The iPhone asks me if I want to use Face ID to authenticate the app (because the iPhone knows I might not want to, or because I might not yet trust Face ID). I let it use Face ID. From that point forward, every time I want to retrieve a password or a serial number or an account number, 1password will just open when I launch it. If I lend my phone to a friend and they attempt to get into 1password, it will demand a passcode. But for me, there will never again be a secondary security pain point when I launch 1password. The same with all my other heightened security walls - they all come crashing down and the pain points disappear.

    So yeah, iPhone X with Face ID is the next big thing.
    That’s basically the main point of faceID. Well, besides the 1 in 1,000,000 chances of get it wrong, literally.
  • Reply 47 of 96
    kevin kee said:
    fmalloy said:

    Apple has an incredible knack for offering up anything as "the next big thing" and people just eat it up. It's made them very, very rich. It certainly worked on you.
    But it is ... the next big thing, I mean.

    What Apple has created here is the next big thing: Passive Biometric Authentication.

    With PBA, the iPhone X makes the pain points of security dissipate the instant you pick up the phone and start to use it. It's the reason that Android and other handset makers will have to copy it, even if it's expensive - even if they don't understand why they have to copy it. They follow Apple for a reason, even if that reason doesn't rise to the level of consciousness for a long while.

    You copy from the smart kid even if you don't know why.

    Here's your workflow: you pick up your phone and start to use it. The first thing it demands is that you unlock it. You give it your fingerprint or iris scan (or whatever biometric authentication you use to avoid having to enter that complex passcode everyone says you need). You use an app or a website and it demands your password. You open your password vault (I use 1password), and it either demands your master passcode or offers you biometric authentication, to gain entrance to a room you've erected in case someone picks up or has borrowed your phone (you don't want just any Tom, Dick, or Jerry to see your passwords). So you authenticate that using your iris scanner or thumbprint on a sensor pad to get the password you needed. You use your smart scale and want to see the stats. It wants a passcode/authentication. Your drug store app. Your blood sugar tracking app. I have ssh and vnc apps which can connect to a number of servers at work without needing to remember authentication credentials - you probably have something similar, and have to authenticate that. Your Quicken or investment app.

    Everywhere where you've installed heightened security to protect an area of secrecy or critical information is a security pain-point you have to deal with. Until iPhone X.

    With iPhone X and passive biometric authentication, I open 1password. The iPhone asks me if I want to use Face ID to authenticate the app (because the iPhone knows I might not want to, or because I might not yet trust Face ID). I let it use Face ID. From that point forward, every time I want to retrieve a password or a serial number or an account number, 1password will just open when I launch it. If I lend my phone to a friend and they attempt to get into 1password, it will demand a passcode. But for me, there will never again be a secondary security pain point when I launch 1password. The same with all my other heightened security walls - they all come crashing down and the pain points disappear.

    So yeah, iPhone X with Face ID is the next big thing.
    That’s basically the main point of faceID. Well, besides the 1 in 1,000,000 chances of get it wrong, literally.
    Yeah...

    Think what it will be like when FaceID is available on your Mac and other Apple hardware.

    Then there's the potential for making a separate FaceID package that can be used in many different security applications -- from unlocking/opening a door -- to checkin at the airport -- or renting a truck at Home Depot.

    Edit:

    Whoa!  It just occurred to me that FaceID @ 1 in 1 million accuracy might be a pretty good replacement for DNA match @ 1 in 10 million accuracy -- and much faster -- two quick head rolls vs days of lab tests.

    Now consider that this is version 1.0 of FaceID and it is likely its accuracy will improve in future implementations.

    Add to that, Apple's acquisition of FoundationDB -- an Ordered Key/Value NoSQL Database -- with the ability to process 14.4 million write transactions per second.

    It appears that Apple has all the pieces for a really good Identity Verification System.


    Edit 2:

    I just checked the Bureau of Transportation stats:  

    732 million US enplaned passangers in 2017.   732 / 14.4 == less than 1 minute to Identity/Verify all US passengers...



    edited November 2017 radarthekatGG1argonaut
  • Reply 48 of 96
    Cringeworthy article. It was very informative and useful, but it sounds like an Apple advertisement, which makes it hard to read and not roll your eyes. With so many Apple enthousiasts here, we don't need to be convinced of how great Apple is. 
  • Reply 49 of 96
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,399member
    k2kw said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    fmalloy said:
    lkrupp said:
    scottkrk2 said:
    I'll be sitting out this year's iPhone update, lots of new technology but few benefits.
    I was going to just say “whatever” to you but then I decided to take a look at your twelve posts on this forum. Wow, talk about recitations from the Troll Catechism, you hit them all. Can’t you think for yourself? Are you a bot?
    So all posts on the iPhone X should be nothing but a circle jerk of praise and an echo chamber for Apple fans?

    We already got this from the professional reviewers.

    Apple has an incredible knack for offering up anything as "the next big thing" and people just eat it up. It's made them very, very rich. It certainly worked on you.

    Can anyone else feel that?

    A disturbance in the butthurt.  

    like a billion Android fans screamed in terror … then were suddenly silenced. 

    You can always judge the potential success of a new Apple product by the sphincter-clenching jealousy it produces in the “hate Apple until the end of time” brigade. 

    Though to be accurate, it’s not a hatred of Apple: it’s a lack of confidence in their own choice. They know there is a possibility that there is something better out there, and that knowledge just kills them. The irony is that they claim Android gives them “choice”. But they don’t want choice. They want everyone to use the same phone as they use, so they don’t have to feel that they’re missing out. 

    It’s bigly sad. 
    1.   Apple executes their design and build better than anyone.   Apple may be using (buying) a Samsung screen but they didn't insecurely feel the need to copy the Edge on Samsung phones.

    2.   Android phones seem to make (at least) one stupid mistake.   Essential had a beautiful design but a bad camera experience (a notch I could live with).   S8 and Note 8 put their finger print scanners next to the camera (just stupid).   And then there are the Pixel 2/2XL's and their screen problems (burning or ghosting within a week)?

    3.   Why do all the Andrcoidati love their Pixels' because it doesn't have the crap that the OEM's put on their phones.  They are looking for a phone that doesn't lag, slowdown, or Freeze over time like an iPhone - or will atleast get them through a year till the next model.   See the latest report's about the Note8 freezing.   Most Android OEM's  don't trust Google.

    4.   Google doesn't seem to be have a sustained multi-year commitment to hardware.   They buy Motorola and then sell it.   They start Android Wear and now that has lost steam.   How long will Google stay in the hardware business.    Who knows?

    5   Android has a couple good features (services) - I think Maps, Search, and the Google Assistant are very good.   I wish that Apple would come out with a phones that would improve SIRI at the same rate that Apple has innovated in displays (HDR screen, true tone, Super Retina Display)  or all the work they put into FaceID with the sensor array in the notch.     How about some special dedicated hardware for SIRI - new microphones, on board AI chip for Natural language translation and the ability to work without a Cell connection (I do need to go through those SIRI training videos AI did but that seems so 1990's DragonDictate - Alexa just works for me even when I slur my words at night).
    Good post.  Just a few comments:
    2) Essential was an OK phone, but in many areas, it was 2016 level tech for a 2017 flagship.  The S8 had more than a poorly placed fingerprint scanner - basically a partially useful iris scanner, and a completely useless face recognition system.  Still did not have depth cameras / zoom on phones costing more than the iPhone 8+.  For all of the Android flagships, they are also now well behind Apple in CPU/GPU performance (the term is getting crushed).

    5) Fully agree, and it is something that I have been expecting on a new phone since last year.  Apple mgmt aren't stupid - they know the enormous criticism that Siri gets (even when as usual much of it is overblown) and that in some ways it is allowing Amazon to get a toehold in the home h/w market.  I can only think that Apple are holding off trying to "really improve Siri" until they have some on-device h/w that makes it shine.  Something that will have an "order of magnitude" improvement, using items you note (multiple mics, DSPs, neural chip,...) and allow for on-board execution of actions which do not require the 'net.
    watto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 50 of 96
    I just bought mine in India, and the back of the phone got really hot during setup. Anyone else experiencing this?
  • Reply 51 of 96
    Cringeworthy article. It was very informative and useful, but it sounds like an Apple advertisement, which makes it hard to read and not roll your eyes. With so many Apple enthousiasts here, we don't need to be convinced of how great Apple is. 
    Praise to Apple only sounds like advertising to the trolls. I have no problem with Apple getting praise, or rational criticism. To single one out as bad is silly. 
    patchythepirateradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 52 of 96
    $1300 is a hell of a lot of money for your average Joe or Jane.  
    [...] But stop complaining that there are higher tiers than what you’re comfortable with. 
    I wasn't complaining.  "Affordable" just struck me as an odd adjective for (AFAIK) the most expensive commodity phone in history.  I've now DuckDuckGoed "affordable luxury" and see that it is a common phrase.  Okey-doke.  
  • Reply 53 of 96

    I found the article useful and informative, if verbose.

    IMO, DED should avoid the hyperbole and the temptation to disparage the competition at every opportunity:

    AppleInsider said:
    iPhone X isn't aspiring to look like an angular techie robot on a mission to monetize everyone's content with advertising messages or a square panel of "live tile" TV boxes seeking to impose licensing taxes on the enterprise. 

    In my opinion, DED should take every opportunity to disparage imitation products that have only achieve their modicum of success off the back of Apple's success.
    StrangeDaysradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 54 of 96
    The marketing strategy of introducing both the 8 and the X simultaneously was brilliant.   It shows how Apple thinks through every issue and situation to find the best answer for THAT issue.

    They knew that the X was going to be too pricey for many people (not all).  And, that while many simply could not afford it others would choose not to -- while many would be willing to pay premium dollars for what is indisputably THE BEST -- EVER.

    But Apple realized that the primary functional improvement was the A11 processor and all the future capability that that monster unlocks.

    So, they put it in both the 8 and X.  So, the 8 gets all the future proof functionality of the X without paying for the more cosmetic stuff like the OLED screen and facial recognition.   Yes, those things are truly beautiful -- but the 8 can do anything X can do.

    Apple threw a Win-Win on this one.   Good Job!
    macplusplusradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 55 of 96
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,434member
    fmalloy said:
    lkrupp said:
    scottkrk2 said:
    I'll be sitting out this year's iPhone update, lots of new technology but few benefits.
    I was going to just say “whatever” to you but then I decided to take a look at your twelve posts on this forum. Wow, talk about recitations from the Troll Catechism, you hit them all. Can’t you think for yourself? Are you a bot?
    So all posts on the iPhone X should be nothing but a circle jerk of praise and an echo chamber for Apple fans?

    We already got this from the professional reviewers.

    Apple has an incredible knack for offering up anything as "the next big thing" and people just eat it up. It's made them very, very rich. It certainly worked on you.
    Nothing could be further from the truth.   However if people are dismissing this iteration as not offering anything new they simply aren't being objective.    This is perhaps the biggest update to iPhone in the last 5 years maybe more and introduces technology that will be with us for decades..

    While I don't eat up Apples products, still rocking an iPhone 4, I can see huge advantages to this new iPhone and really do appreciate the advancements seen in the device.    I really don't know of any recent iPhone upgrade that has introduced as much new tech as iPhone X.   It really is a leap forward.
  • Reply 56 of 96
    Is it affordable?
    I love the way the Washington Post answered that question with a question:

    "Pop quiz: Which comes in more flavors, Baskin Robbins ice cream or the iPhone?

    It’s the iPhone, by almost double. There’s a hype around the $1,000 iPhone X, but Apple actually makes eight iPhone models right now, each in multiple colors and storage capacities."

    Is that another way of saying:  Quit bitching and go buy one!


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 57 of 96
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,434member

    boeyc15 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    larrystar said:
     Affordable? 
    Yes, people have actually bought it, so it’s affordable. 


    Come on... fine lets play that game --- 'affordable to significant amount of present Apple iphone owners that have purchased their iphone as a new flagship phone when it came out?'
    Why significant amount of present iPhone owners would buy iPhone X? They are not geeks changing an iPhone every year and not everyone even needs an iPhone X. Those who need it can afford it, as actual sales show.
    Not to be a contrarian but you really can't judge affordability based on the early adopter rush.    Come back in six months and let the market show you if people think it is affordable.    As with every product release for Apple you have to get past the made dash before you will know if device is a success.    One example is Mac Book, during the made rush sales look good then people start to realize it is an awful machine for the money expended and sales tank.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 58 of 96
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,434member
    kevin kee said:
    fmalloy said:

    Apple has an incredible knack for offering up anything as "the next big thing" and people just eat it up. It's made them very, very rich. It certainly worked on you.
    But it is ... the next big thing, I mean.

    What Apple has created here is the next big thing: Passive Biometric Authentication.

    With PBA, the iPhone X makes the pain points of security dissipate the instant you pick up the phone and start to use it. It's the reason that Android and other handset makers will have to copy it, even if it's expensive - even if they don't understand why they have to copy it. They follow Apple for a reason, even if that reason doesn't rise to the level of consciousness for a long while.

    You copy from the smart kid even if you don't know why.

    Here's your workflow: you pick up your phone and start to use it. The first thing it demands is that you unlock it. You give it your fingerprint or iris scan (or whatever biometric authentication you use to avoid having to enter that complex passcode everyone says you need). You use an app or a website and it demands your password. You open your password vault (I use 1password), and it either demands your master passcode or offers you biometric authentication, to gain entrance to a room you've erected in case someone picks up or has borrowed your phone (you don't want just any Tom, Dick, or Jerry to see your passwords). So you authenticate that using your iris scanner or thumbprint on a sensor pad to get the password you needed. You use your smart scale and want to see the stats. It wants a passcode/authentication. Your drug store app. Your blood sugar tracking app. I have ssh and vnc apps which can connect to a number of servers at work without needing to remember authentication credentials - you probably have something similar, and have to authenticate that. Your Quicken or investment app.

    Everywhere where you've installed heightened security to protect an area of secrecy or critical information is a security pain-point you have to deal with. Until iPhone X.

    With iPhone X and passive biometric authentication, I open 1password. The iPhone asks me if I want to use Face ID to authenticate the app (because the iPhone knows I might not want to, or because I might not yet trust Face ID). I let it use Face ID. From that point forward, every time I want to retrieve a password or a serial number or an account number, 1password will just open when I launch it. If I lend my phone to a friend and they attempt to get into 1password, it will demand a passcode. But for me, there will never again be a secondary security pain point when I launch 1password. The same with all my other heightened security walls - they all come crashing down and the pain points disappear.

    So yeah, iPhone X with Face ID is the next big thing.
    That’s basically the main point of faceID. Well, besides the 1 in 1,000,000 chances of get it wrong, literally.
    Yeah...

    Think what it will be like when FaceID is available on your Mac and other Apple hardware.

    Then there's the potential for making a separate FaceID package that can be used in many different security applications -- from unlocking/opening a door -- to checkin at the airport -- or renting a truck at Home Depot.

    Edit:

    Whoa!  It just occurred to me that FaceID @ 1 in 1 million accuracy might be a pretty good replacement for DNA match @ 1 in 10 million accuracy -- and much faster -- two quick head rolls vs days of lab tests.

    Now consider that this is version 1.0 of FaceID and it is likely its accuracy will improve in future implementations.

    Add to that, Apple's acquisition of FoundationDB -- an Ordered Key/Value NoSQL Database -- with the ability to process 14.4 million write transactions per second.

    It appears that Apple has all the pieces for a really good Identity Verification System.



    What people are missing with Face ID is the potential for the technology.    For example you talk about Identify Verification System (IVS) which is an idea in itself.   IVS could be sued to support multiple users on Apples IOS devices.   IOS would recognize a user as one of many possibly authorized for a device and setup a log on for that individual.   The IVS would set permissions and access controls for that specific person..   Toss your iPad to your kids and they intently log on with a unique set of apps and security levels.

    As good as that might sound to some (not a fan myself) there are other longer term possibilities.   For example how about robotics and robots capable of identifying all members of a family for example.    How about an auto operating system that scans the driver and immediately sets performance and operational characteristics of that automobile for person behind the wheel.   In the end though this technology is a must to really be able to implement the robots fo the future.   Robots that can recognize you your family and your neighbors.
    radarthekatGG1
  • Reply 59 of 96
    wizard69 said:

    boeyc15 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    larrystar said:
     Affordable? 
    Yes, people have actually bought it, so it’s affordable. 


    Come on... fine lets play that game --- 'affordable to significant amount of present Apple iphone owners that have purchased their iphone as a new flagship phone when it came out?'
    Why significant amount of present iPhone owners would buy iPhone X? They are not geeks changing an iPhone every year and not everyone even needs an iPhone X. Those who need it can afford it, as actual sales show.
    Not to be a contrarian but you really can't judge affordability based on the early adopter rush.    Come back in six months and let the market show you if people think it is affordable.    As with every product release for Apple you have to get past the made dash before you will know if device is a success.    One example is Mac Book, during the made rush sales look good then people start to realize it is an awful machine for the money expended and sales tank.
    True!
    But my gut is telling me that Apple is playing the long game here:  More so than at any time since Job's death their strategy will unfold over years -- and the X is just the first step -- so its commercial success or failure this year or next is not overly important to Apple.  They're looking 2, 3, 4 years down the down the road.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 60 of 96
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,434member


    I found the article useful and informative, if verbose.

    IMO, DED should avoid the hyperbole and the temptation to disparage the competition at every opportunity:

    AppleInsider said:
    iPhone X isn't aspiring to look like an angular techie robot on a mission to monetize everyone's content with advertising messages or a square panel of "live tile" TV boxes seeking to impose licensing taxes on the enterprise. 

    In my opinion, DED should take every opportunity to disparage imitation products that have only achieve their modicum of success off the back of Apple's success.
    Unfortunately it makes DED look ignorant and petty.   Int also make it impossible to read some of his articles.
    muthuk_vanalingam
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