Apple brings Everyone Can Code program to over 20 schools outside US

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple on Wednesday announced that its Everyone Can Code initiative is expanding to more than 20 colleges and universities beyond U.S. borders, allowing students to pursue the company's App Development With Swift curriculum in a full-year course.




Some of the participating schools include RMIT University in Australia, Mercantec in Denmark, Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen in the Netherlands, the Unitec Institute of Technology in New Zealand, and Plymouth University in the U.K. At RMIT, App Development With Swift will be available later this month through RMIT Online as well as an on-campus vocational course.

RMIT is also offering scholarships to teachers wanting to learn coding, and a free summer school course at the institution's City campus.

Over 30 U.S. community colleges are offering App Development With Swift, including the likes of Austin Community College and Northeast Mississippi Community College. Some high schools are running the course as well.

The material was designed by Apple engineers in tandem with educators, and is presumably meant to entrench Swift as a platform. Though it can be used on Linux, Swift is mostly Apple-centric, meant to build apps for macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    I wonder if the cirriculum will ever end up in iTunes U... 
    lolliver
  • Reply 2 of 6
    They should include a section on how to change careers when you get carpal tunnel syndrome 
    urahara
  • Reply 3 of 6
    uraharaurahara Posts: 153member
    Dead_Pool said:
    They should include a section on how to change careers when you get carpal tunnel syndrome 
    Sad but true. 
  • Reply 4 of 6
    stevehsteveh Posts: 464member
    urahara said:
    Dead_Pool said:
    They should include a section on how to change careers when you get carpal tunnel syndrome 
    Sad but true. 
    Not necessarily. I spent 35+ years working as a technical writer, 0 RSI issues. You can do it if you pay attention to keyboard ergonomics, etc.
    colinng
  • Reply 5 of 6
    urahara said:
    Dead_Pool said:
    They should include a section on how to change careers when you get carpal tunnel syndrome 
    Sad but true. 
    Ever tried NOT to use a keyboard of the height of a mountain? Something like,...ehh...I don't know, a mac keyboard that is thin, comparing to a lot of so called ergonomic keyboards?
  • Reply 6 of 6
    Dead_Pool said:
    They should include a section on how to change careers when you get carpal tunnel syndrome 
    I think the TextBlade might delay the onset of RSI. I say delay because someone told me it wasn't a matter of if but when we get RSI. Maybe it will delay the onset until past my natural lifetime! 

    Traditional keyboards have bad ergonomics: lots of finger reach, with ever further reach and larger areas of responsibility for progressively weaker fingers (compare striking J vs. Backspace). Reaching further reduces leverage, exacerbating the problem. 

    Having used the TextBlade for several months, I can say that my hands (and wrists and forearms) aren't tired at the end of a day, whereas with the next best keyboard I have, they were tired. It also doesn't hurt that the TextBlade is the most portable keyboard too! I was touch-typing at the same speed after a few weeks.
    edited November 2017
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