Apple acknowledges iPhone X becoming unresponsive in cold weather, promises software fix

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 56
    bluefire1 said:
    Anyone concerned about this issue might want to enable AssistiveTouch from the Accessibility menu--it will create a visual home button.
    What would this do? You still wouldn't be able to press the  home button on the screen since the screen is unresponsive 😅
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 22 of 56
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,162member
    Maybe they were factoring in global warming  ;)
    Stop spreading fake news 
    Aww come on, we can’t all move to Florida!
  • Reply 23 of 56
    meh, happens every winter. Doesn't even have to be THAT cold, just using it outside below 5°C can cause it to switch off. Happened on my 5, 6S and on the 5S I'm using most recently.

    We're (Scotland) expected to have a VERY cold winter this year so I expect the shutdowns to happen much more frequently.
  • Reply 24 of 56
    evilution said:
    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    It works in the recommended temperature range and it’s the same issue on most touchscreen phones.
    I’ve never come across this issue before and I live in Minnesota.
  • Reply 25 of 56

    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    It’s good that Apple is quickly addressing things but I have friends and family that are quite annoyed at always seeing a red notification badge on the settings app. 
  • Reply 26 of 56
    evilution said:
    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    It works in the recommended temperature range and it’s the same issue on most touchscreen phones.
    Really? Then what the heck are they fixing?
    edited November 2017 gatorguymuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 27 of 56
    This is why Apple shouldn’t design things in sunny California where it’s always 60-80 degrees. They should really test things in NY/PA where just Monday it was 80 degrees and tonight the local ski mountain is making snow...
  • Reply 28 of 56
    tshapi said:
    I don’t think it’s a “bug” the “touch screen” senses the heat from your fingers that’s how it works. If the weather is too cold the. Your fingers get cold too. So I suspect it has to do with this.  Apple just needs to adjust something related to the sensor in the phone I would guess. Probably how heat sensitive it is if I had to guess 
    No, touch screens work via capacitance... the electrical disruption of a plane caused by your finger. It’s likely that changes in temperature effect how that electrical change is measured and it could be that Apple had lowered the power to the touch screen or are not altering the power enough to accomodate atmospheric changes.
    pscooter63
  • Reply 29 of 56
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,035member
    wood1208 said:
    Which screen tech is better against much colder and much warmer temperature/weather ? LCD or OLED ? That is the Question !!
    I would suspect that OLEDs are better in the cold. Most spec sheets on them that I have seen advertise a wider operating temperature range than LCDs, and that's without resorting to extended temperature range models that usually have significant compromises. LCDs have been around a lot longer and have a more thorough testing history so we know that they stop working once they get frozen. After all, the L in LCD stands for liquid. Liquids tend to become solids at their freezing points. It is possible to extend the freezing point of LCDs to much lower than 0C without using a battery-killing heater but that probably has a significant effect on other characteristics such as color accuracy -- and the iPhone has extremely good color accuracy. And let's not get into the misnomer of LED panel displays -- those are LCDs using LEDs as backlights.

    I suspect that people will find that the color accuracy of the iPhone X will degrade more quickly than a comparable one that uses an LCD. Such is the nature of the OLED panel. After 10000 hours of usage people are going to notice a degradation. But that is a lot of hours on a cell phone.
    Soli
  • Reply 30 of 56

    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    It’s good that Apple is quickly addressing things but I have friends and family that are quite annoyed at always seeing a red notification badge on the settings app. 
    Heavens! Well heck, we don’t want to annoy your relatives — no more software updates or fixes, guys! Shut it all down...Software is now frozen!
    king editor the grate
  • Reply 31 of 56
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,727member
    Anilu_777 said:
    This is the same for all touchscreens I’ve ever used. For two of them, the BlackBerry Z10 and Z30, touch was crucial as there was no home button (sound familiar?). So it’s not new. But I’m glad Apple will do something about it as the X’s reputation (and presumably that of subsequent models) depends on it “just working”. 
    Samsung did at least try to solve this with the Galaxy Note 7 of course / ;)
    Solidsk1
  • Reply 32 of 56
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,727member

    Rayz2016 said:
    Weird that they can fix this in software. 
    It changes the desktop graphic to a really hot babe / guy of your choice ;)
  • Reply 33 of 56
    mike1mike1 Posts: 3,279member
    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    Has nothing to do with dropping a ball. Has to do with electronics in the cold. Period. I can't think of consumer electronic device that is designed to work in below freezing temperatures.
  • Reply 34 of 56
    mike1mike1 Posts: 3,279member
    linkman said:
    wood1208 said:
    Which screen tech is better against much colder and much warmer temperature/weather ? LCD or OLED ? That is the Question !!
    I would suspect that OLEDs are better in the cold. Most spec sheets on them that I have seen advertise a wider operating temperature range than LCDs, and that's without resorting to extended temperature range models that usually have significant compromises. LCDs have been around a lot longer and have a more thorough testing history so we know that they stop working once they get frozen. After all, the L in LCD stands for liquid. Liquids tend to become solids at their freezing points. It is possible to extend the freezing point of LCDs to much lower than 0C without using a battery-killing heater but that probably has a significant effect on other characteristics such as color accuracy -- and the iPhone has extremely good color accuracy. And let's not get into the misnomer of LED panel displays -- those are LCDs using LEDs as backlights.

    I suspect that people will find that the color accuracy of the iPhone X will degrade more quickly than a comparable one that uses an LCD. Such is the nature of the OLED panel. After 10000 hours of usage people are going to notice a degradation. But that is a lot of hours on a cell phone.
    It may have nothing to do with the screen itself, but the underlying components and their operating conditions.
  • Reply 35 of 56
    I was experiencing this issue all day in NYC yesterday. I thought it was a compatibility issue with apps that haven’t been updated. Turns out the one common factor was me going outside when attempting to open apps, a link, calendar event, etc. This was in chilly weather, but not below freezing. Sounds like a software fix increasing capacitance should do the trick!
    Soli
  • Reply 36 of 56
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 18,016member
    LCD touch screens become sluggish is cold weather?  You're shitting me    :D
  • Reply 37 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,210member
    mike1 said:
    linkman said:
    wood1208 said:
    Which screen tech is better against much colder and much warmer temperature/weather ? LCD or OLED ? That is the Question !!
    I would suspect that OLEDs are better in the cold. Most spec sheets on them that I have seen advertise a wider operating temperature range than LCDs, and that's without resorting to extended temperature range models that usually have significant compromises. LCDs have been around a lot longer and have a more thorough testing history so we know that they stop working once they get frozen. After all, the L in LCD stands for liquid. Liquids tend to become solids at their freezing points. It is possible to extend the freezing point of LCDs to much lower than 0C without using a battery-killing heater but that probably has a significant effect on other characteristics such as color accuracy -- and the iPhone has extremely good color accuracy. And let's not get into the misnomer of LED panel displays -- those are LCDs using LEDs as backlights.

    I suspect that people will find that the color accuracy of the iPhone X will degrade more quickly than a comparable one that uses an LCD. Such is the nature of the OLED panel. After 10000 hours of usage people are going to notice a degradation. But that is a lot of hours on a cell phone.
    It may have nothing to do with the screen itself, but the underlying components and their operating conditions.
    So maybe the "fix" Apple says is coming turns on Aux. Heat sooner? :)


    Kidding.....
  • Reply 38 of 56
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    MplsP said:
    This is nothing new - living in MN, my wife and I routinely have our iPhones go unresponsive and shut down if they get cold. Bring them inside and warm them up and they comeback to life. I think the processsor must be a reptile.
    It's not so much the processor(s) as the touch screen response at low temps. (I'm a couple hours north of you, so even colder these days.)
  • Reply 39 of 56
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    mike54 said:
    Is this an issue with LCD screens?
    Yes, if it gets cold enough.
  • Reply 40 of 56
    stevehsteveh Posts: 480member
    These sorts of ball-drops -- even if minor -- are getting to be a tad annoying. One would think this sort of thing was basic quality control. 
    Have you ever read the spec sheet for, say, smart phones, not just Apple's?

    There is a normal operating range listed, for example for the SE:

    Environmental Requirements:
         • Operating ambient temperature: 32° to 95° F (0° to 35° C)
         • Nonoperating temperature: ‑4° to 113° F (‑20° to 45° C)

    Currently here in the upper midwest, we're running about 30ºF below the specified ambient operating temperature. This doesn't
    just affect smart phones, digital cameras and other electronics is affected, too. You find ways to work around it, but expecting
    things to just work normally in the very cold isn't in the cards.

    Just wait 'til February-ish, where we may be getting days another 30-40º colder.
    baconstangpscooter63
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