This week on AI: Apple AR glasses in 2020, iPad Pro with Face ID & more

Posted:
in General Discussion edited November 2017
With the iPhone X barely on shelves, rumors have already begun to turn to future Apple hardware, including the company's predicted augmented reality headset.




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Everything you need to know:

  • An Apple AR headset running "rOS" could ship in 2020 > >
  • The next iPad Pro could have thinner bezels and Face ID > >
  • The 2018 successor to the iPhone X could have a new chassis design > >
  • Apple is prepping a software fix for iPhone X models losing touch in cold weather > >
  • iOS 11.1.1 solved an "i" autocorrect bug that was target of jokes > >
  • The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal of a $119.6 million verdict against Samsung > >
  • Apple became embroiled in the Paradise Papers scandal, but denied any wrongdoing > >
For in-depth discussion of this week's hottest stories, listen to the AppleInsider podcast. Subscribe here, or stream the embed below:

A roundup of all of our hottest stories this week:

Apple AR headset codenamed 'T288' said to run new 'rOS' operating system, launch as soon as 2020

Apple said to ditch home button for Face ID with thinner bezeled 2018 iPad Pros, but don't expect an OLED display

Apple's 2018 iPhone X will have new metal frame allowing for faster wireless data transfers

Apple acknowledges iPhone X becoming unresponsive in cold weather, promises software fix

Apple releases iOS 11.1.1 update with 'i' autocorrect fix, 'Hey Siri' bug repair

Apple's $119.6 million victory in iPhone utility patent battle with Samsung finally upheld

Paradise Papers suggest Apple shifted holding firm to Jersey to protect $252B from taxation; Apple refutes claim

Broadcom tenders offering valued at $130 billion for Apple legal foe Qualcomm

Apple launches another $7 billion bond sale to fund stock buyback, other programs

iPhone X availability expands to 14 more countries before the end of November

Apple Pay Cash support arrives in iOS 11.2 beta as public testers receive second build

Israel-based Corephotonics sues Apple over iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone 8 Plus dual-lens camera

Encryption debate may start anew with discovery of Sutherland Springs shooter's smartphone

Video: All iPhone X gestures and interactions in under 5 minutes

Jennifer Aniston & Reese Witherspoon drama, Drake TV and movies on tap for Apple

Apple Park Visitor Center to see Nov. 17 grand opening

Apple acquires photo sensor technology company InVisage

Apple's Clips 2.0 adds iPhone X TrueDepth features, Selfie Scenes, 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' content

Apple's latest diversity figures show static global gender balance, more US progress

Some iPhone X owners report mystery green lines appearing on displays

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,465member
    Hey, you got another Google Glass pic to illustrate the concept of wearable AR glass(es)!

    I actually appreciate being reminded of how awful Google's design was, so keep 'em coming. 

    Glass was stupid. Apple's will be less stupid. Why?

    For one thing, Google is a left-brained company, and thus designed a device that works with the right eye only. (Visual pathways cross in the brain; the left hemisphere of the brain is mostly wired to the right eye.)

    Apple is a right-brain company. The right hemisphere controls awareness of the world around us; it wishes to be aware of all the senses working in concert, particularly both eyes working together for binocular, stereo-depth vision.

    A right-brain designer or company would never design a monocular, left-hemisphere device. It looks, and is, crippled, and using it will further exacerbate the left-brained bias that geek companies like Google are stuck in. This is the real reason that Glass failed. It is an offense to the bilateral symmetry of our nervous systems, and we reacted unconsciously, viscerally to its assymetry.

    So keep using those Glass images if you want, but do so with awareness that Apple won't put a stick in one of your eyes like that.
  • Reply 2 of 6
    Apple's 2020 Vision
    edited November 2017
  • Reply 3 of 6
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,609member
    flaneur said:
    This is the real reason that Glass failed. It is an offense to the bilateral symmetry of our nervous systems, and we reacted unconsciously, viscerally to its assymetry.
    That's part of it, I suppose. When you can't even make a model look un-creepy with it, what's the hope for the rest of us? :)

    But, I think it's also just creepy in concept. No one wants a bunch of walking video cameras recording everything... even if we're currently close to that anyway, in other ways. At least with a phone, you know someone is filming you. And, most people still don't have secret spy-pens and watches (we assume).
  • Reply 4 of 6
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,609member
    Also, I was listening at somewhere between 2 and 3x speed... but if I understood, I think I have a qualm about the discussion regarding technology advance vs physics and cameras.

    Technology isn't going to overcome physics, nor is physics likely to change. Light through lenses for cameras has some absolute boundaries that you can't cross without tradeoffs. Technological advance won't fix that... it might just find some other way to accommodate it (i.e.: digital zoom).
  • Reply 5 of 6
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,735member
    cgWerks said:
    Also, I was listening at somewhere between 2 and 3x speed... but if I understood, I think I have a qualm about the discussion regarding technology advance vs physics and cameras.

    Technology isn't going to overcome physics, nor is physics likely to change. Light through lenses for cameras has some absolute boundaries that you can't cross without tradeoffs. Technological advance won't fix that... it might just find some other way to accommodate it (i.e.: digital zoom).
    Well, even within physics limitations, you can do wonderful stuff with... Physics and a lot of computation.
    You're sensor doesn't have to be flat and light doesn't have to get to it in the traditional manner.
    you can get around many noise issues with lots of computations (they already do).

    Of course, past of certain point, the info simply is not there and the optics themselves are a limitation.

    Maybe collect the light directly with some weird sensitive sensor, without a lens and just compute everything is the way to do it and that would be a thin "lens".
    If the whole back of the phone can collect light, then you could really shoot even in the dark.

  • Reply 6 of 6
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,609member
    foggyhill said:
    Well, even within physics limitations, you can do wonderful stuff with... Physics and a lot of computation.
    You're sensor doesn't have to be flat and light doesn't have to get to it in the traditional manner.
    you can get around many noise issues with lots of computations (they already do).

    Of course, past of certain point, the info simply is not there and the optics themselves are a limitation.

    Maybe collect the light directly with some weird sensitive sensor, without a lens and just compute everything is the way to do it and that would be a thin "lens".
    If the whole back of the phone can collect light, then you could really shoot even in the dark.
    Heh, I suppose that would be one of those alternate ways if possible. :)
    Or... they could just make the phone thicker! (Though I suppose they'd have to put Ive in an institution after that, or something.)
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