Android smartphones expected to follow Apple's iPhone X lead in adopting 3D sensor tech

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    wood1208 said:
    lukei said:
    The quality and integrity of Apple’s technology for FaceID shows how poor previous Android implementations have been. 
    You just don't want to be first but importantly RIGHT. But, this was never be a Android's forte,slogan. They just rush to the market with poor implementation and unfortunately buyers get shafted.
    If buyers cared, they would have stopped buying. Since they didn't, I assume, they think it is a fine product. You can't really bash people for the lack of high expectations.
    edited November 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 35
    fallenjt said:
    But but Android handsets have had face ID for years according to idiotic fandroids! No?

    To be fair, I've never heard any Android site, aficionados or tech blogs refer to Samsung's face recognition as a face ID. I've been expecting to see the 'ID' moniker but it never appears. So it does seem that everyone makes a distinction between 'identification' and 'recognition'.
  • Reply 23 of 35
    Yes we all agree the Android world will reverse engineer what Apple did, but the issue they will have will be the software to make it work, plus as Apple said all the testing they did, Apple competitors do not have resources Apple has to do all the testing to prove out the tech. It odd third same reason no one has matched the Apple watch. Apple has no much data that allows they to make the product work correctly. 

    Also the processing power need to make this work Qualcomm has not kept up. Also who is developing the software, Google, Qualcomm, Samsung, or some open source code that had security holes all over.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 35
    VRing said:
    Again, why are we all pretending this wasn't already in the pipeline for hardware manufacturers?


    VRing: You are right about it being n the pipeline but several things need to be considered. Do Qualcomm’s Snapdragon and Huawei’s Kirin future SOC have the AI chops to do this thing right? The successful implementation of a FaceID clone involves more than just a camera and sensor array. Will they have anything comparable to the Secure Enclave, the neural network and the software/hardware AI handshake that Apple does? Is Android ready for prime time in this regard. Inquiring minds want to know...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 35
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,302member
    MacPro said:
    Where is Gatrguy to explain how Android had it first and Apple copied them?  With numerous links to articles backing this up of course.
    Never done that before so why start now?  Not my style. You've confused me for someone else, or just tossing a bit of FUD around on a slow Friday evening... . One or the other. 
    edited November 2017 Soli
  • Reply 26 of 35
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Bazza said:
    VRing said:
    Again, why are we all pretending this wasn't already in the pipeline for hardware manufacturers?


    VRing: You are right about it being n the pipeline but several things need to be considered. Do Qualcomm’s Snapdragon and Huawei’s Kirin future SOC have the AI chops to do this thing right? The successful implementation of a FaceID clone involves more than just a camera and sensor array. Will they have anything comparable to the Secure Enclave, the neural network and the software/hardware AI handshake that Apple does? Is Android ready for prime time in this regard. Inquiring minds want to know...
    Vring is right about nothing, a piece of hardware is not a solution, you need an OS that is adapte, several pieces of custom hardware (like A11) and a good AI implementation for the field you are working in (probably based on tons of IP, which Apple has bought years ago)... WTF do those wanabe's have.. A camera?  Apple bought at least 4 companies in the filed of depth sensing and facial recognition a long time ago.

    Hell it took a few years to create half assed touch ID clones and they'll just pull something more complicated out of their asses; not a chance.

    They will sell something, but it will be in no way as good -- just sold as being as good.


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 35
    The words “Android” and “Follow” are well paired. 

    -MAS 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 35
    Wow! This is coming to *all* Android handsets? That's what the headline implies. But what's the actual number?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 35
    Apple implements and Android copycats. Who’d have guessed. In other news, the sun is expected to rise again tomorrow.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 35
    Aren't Android phones already leading, with iris sensor which has proven to be faster and more secure than 3D face?

    And swipe up home has been here since Android 7 (ie, before Apple).
    edited November 2017
  • Reply 31 of 35
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,388member
    Aren't Android phones already leading, with iris sensor which has proven to be faster and more secure than 3D face?
    1) No.

    2) What's "3D face"?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 35
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,305member
    Martin57 said:
    The words “Android” and “Follow” are well paired. 

    -MAS 
    Just like 'Apple' and 'Follow' would be equally well paired.

    Whose lead did Apple follow on depth sensing, wireless charging, fast charging, water resistance, OLED, fingerprint scanners, bezeless, the notch, Siri and so many other advances. It's all rather pointless don't you think?

    FaceID is just another biometric. Have you considered why Apple didn't put it on the iPhone 8? 

    Many of the elements necessary for FaceID are already in use in Android phones and other non-X iPhones. They have been for a while now. The only real 'dealbreaker' in hardware that isn't widely available on other phones is the NPU which I imagine is a key element of FaceID.

    Also, if a handset manufacturer has a history of using rear mounted biometrics, a full screen phone doesn't mean you need a different biometric solution to a 'problem' that doesn't exist and therefore doesn't need a resolution, especially when it involves a higher cost for the final device. If Apple didn't want a rear placed sensor or an underscreen sensor then they had to find a different biometrics option.

    FaceID is the option and they chose the 'notch' as another option. That's great.

    As for other handset manufacturers, they might or might not implement similar solutions. The hardware involved has existed for years and many companies have competing solutions. Apple buying some of those companies didn't magically sweep up the market leaving a void.

    One such technology, the Cadence 
    Tensilica Vision P6 DSP, already forms part of the Kirin 970 SoC and is perfectly suited to biometrics, 3D depth sensing, AI vision and many other functions. However, an equivalent FaceID option hasn't been implemented on phones running that SoC because, right now, there is simply no need for one and adding one would probably increase the price of the handset. That's just one example and for a DSP. The same applies for ToF sensors etc.

    The same can be said for wireless charging on some phones. It isn't really needed when you have 4000mAh to run off. Why incorporate wireless charging if you already have a massive battery on board and that fast charges so fast that in just 15 mins you pull in far more juice than any wireless charging solution. Should we put things on phones just for the sake of it? 

    In the Android world things work differently. The breadth of models allows for manufacturers to release under-the-radar phones, limited to specific markets and see how they perform in the real world. The successful features, technologies or manufacturing changes can then be applied across more models.

    The situation is radically different at Apple where you get a couple of phones a year and things have to be carefully selected for the user.

    In fact, Apple has revealed that the X wasn't originally planned for release this year.

    Can you imagine how the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus would have stacked up against Android phones this year end without the X? 

    Who is following who's lead pales into insignificance when you take that into consideration.

    For the user, the important thing is that technologies are moving forward and that competition is strong.




  • Reply 33 of 35
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,305member
    Bazza said:
    VRing said:
    Again, why are we all pretending this wasn't already in the pipeline for hardware manufacturers?


    VRing: You are right about it being n the pipeline but several things need to be considered. Do Qualcomm’s Snapdragon and Huawei’s Kirin future SOC have the AI chops to do this thing right? The successful implementation of a FaceID clone involves more than just a camera and sensor array. Will they have anything comparable to the Secure Enclave, the neural network and the software/hardware AI handshake that Apple does? Is Android ready for prime time in this regard. Inquiring minds want to know...
    Qualcomm I don't know. Huawei yes. And it's not only Huawei's future SoC. It's on the current one.


    edited November 2017
  • Reply 34 of 35
    croprcropr Posts: 966member
    MacPro said:
    Where is Gatrguy to explain how Android had it first and Apple copied them?  With numerous links to articles backing this up of course.
    You have to give the credits to the one that reserves the credit and for face recognition it is clearly Apple.  But for other items  (e.g. lowercase labels on keyboard when typing lowercase characters) Apple just followed Android.  And that's how progress works.

  • Reply 35 of 35
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,388member
    cropr said:
    MacPro said:
    Where is Gatrguy to explain how Android had it first and Apple copied them?  With numerous links to articles backing this up of course.
    You have to give the credits to the one that reserves the credit and for face recognition it is clearly Apple.  But for other items  (e.g. lowercase labels on keyboard when typing lowercase characters) Apple just followed Android.  And that's how progress works.
    They followed Android (and others) but it’s not exactly a profcoubd idea. This has existed on macOS’s virtual keyboard for decades before iOS or Android ever existed.

    The iOS keyboard look seems to be a Jobsian* decision and was a common compliant/wish since iOS 1. Surely we can all agree that the Shift key changing case is at least marginally useful so I think this comes down to the look and feel.


    * Has Jobsian already been coined?
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