Watch: Face ID and Touch ID compared

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    I think it is safe to say I would wake up if someone put sunglasses on me or started moving my finger anyways, so why is there a debate about it?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 29
    I think that users that have issues using Face ID either have not properly configured Face ID or are somehow routinely doing something that causes it not to work. Or are just complaining because they don't like it for whatever reason.. Face ID for me has been far more reliable than Touch ID, for many of the reasons already noted, gloves, finger issues (dirty, dry, wound), taking more than one attempt to recognize my finger.. all of that disappeared with Face ID..
    kingofsomewherehotwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 29
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,511member
    I think it is safe to say I would wake up if someone put sunglasses on me or started moving my finger anyways, so why is there a debate about it?

    Maybe there is a debate about it because not all people are equally likely to wake up when others do certain things to them while they sleep.  In other words, you don't represent everyone in the world.
    baconstang
  • Reply 24 of 29
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,472member
    supadav03 said:
    supadav03 said:
    Well one thing I can say for sure is, I’ve had to enter my 6 digit pin much more with FaceID than I had to with TouchID. 


    What I generally do is, when asked for the PIN, I just press the side button and then tap the screen/ raise to wake the phone. It then re-authenticates my face and works fine.

    The PIN asking happens generally when there is a lag between when the screen wakes up and when the face is in line of sight. The phone catches a partial glimpse of the face, which it cannot authenticate, which is why it asks for the PIN.

    Yes, I generally do the same and make Face ID  re-authenticate me but there are many situations per day where I still have issues. If my phone is flat on my desk at work, flat on my counter at home, or in front of me on the couch as I’m laying down watching TV after work. Even if I hunch over the phone to put myself in view of the camera, sometimes it still fails. Touch ID was much better in these situations and I’m surprised at how frequently they arise. Also in my bed in the morning. Noticed Face ID has a lot of trouble then. I feel like it’s because the position I hold the phone in may be too close to my face and it doesn’t get a proper reading. Never had issues with phone being too far. Again, this was never an issue with Touch ID. So they aren’t huge deals and I could always just pick my phone up to better position the camera to get a reading but if we’re talking about convieance, these are extra motions or steps I didn’t have to take with Touch ID. 
    Those are interesting observations.

    Perhaps pillow marks and/or not having your eyes fully open (even when you think they're open) when you wake up can sometimes throw the system. My face usually 'reconfigures' itself after a blast in the shower. Before that, I often look in the mirror and think, 'that's not me'.

    On the subject of looking down, I know I look quite different with the skin on the cheeks 'falling' towards the camera. Face up and the skin falls in the other direction. 

    The biometrics won't change (distance between eyes, nose, mouth etc) but I don't know much other depth information might not match up well enough to give you a pass and unlock in those situations.
  • Reply 25 of 29

    “YouTube is full of videos showing people tricking Face ID with elaborate masks, but logically, having your face captured and 3D printed is not a realistic concern for the overwhelming majority of iPhone X owners.”

    What the use of a mask to trick the system means is that there is some level of vulnerability to be exploited. I have no interest in a facial ID system.
    With our hyper aggressive Border Cops demanding surrender of personal phones because it is a day ending in y, a facial ID system could easily be used to force you into opening your phone without your consent. I know Apple has a button sequence that blocks Face ID, but I am quite sure a weakness will make that a minor speed bump.

    A judge might believe you forgot your passcode, but you did not forget your face.

    BTW, the elaborate masks cost less than $200 to make on a 3D printer.
  • Reply 26 of 29
    Face Id has been reliable when I'm wearing my contacts or my glasses. If not 100% at least I've never had to type in my passcode. It is not as reliable when I'm not wearing corrective lenses. I'm very nearsighted which is not generally a problem with using an iPhone. But with Face Id, if I hold my iPhone X too close to my face, it doesn't register. This can get very annoying because the distance I have to hold it away from my face makes it hard to read and see if it unlocked. This issue, along with the change to the display auto-lock to 30 seconds, was driving me nuts. The solution was to change the auto-lock timeout back to 1 or 2 minutes. Now I'm reasonably happy with Face Id in all reasonable situations.
  • Reply 27 of 29
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member

    “YouTube is full of videos showing people tricking Face ID with elaborate masks, but logically, having your face captured and 3D printed is not a realistic concern for the overwhelming majority of iPhone X owners.”

    What the use of a mask to trick the system means is that there is some level of vulnerability to be exploited. I have no interest in a facial ID system.
    With our hyper aggressive Border Cops demanding surrender of personal phones because it is a day ending in y, a facial ID system could easily be used to force you into opening your phone without your consent. I know Apple has a button sequence that blocks Face ID, but I am quite sure a weakness will make that a minor speed bump.

    A judge might believe you forgot your passcode, but you did not forget your face.

    BTW, the elaborate masks cost less than $200 to make on a 3D printer.
    Another one of your non sicatur declarations like those in another thread.

    The fracking video demonstrates no such things. In fact, it is the opposite of a demonstration. More like a clown show.
    If the little turds producing it actually want to be taken seriously, they'll publish every single steps they took, with timing and then lets someone else reproduce it..
    Otherwise, I'll consider them scam artists, like 99% of the morons on Youtube.
    I'm going to wager those sacks of crap (that produce fingerprint sensors by the way) will not do this.
  • Reply 28 of 29
    Has anyone here been able to get a sibling or child to unlock their phone with Face ID? I’ve seen the videos online & have reads articles but don’t know anyone outside bloggers & YouTube personalities who have made this work. This is obviously anicdontal but I had both my brothers and both my sisters try. None were successful. I had all 4 of my kids try (ages between 6-12) and none were able to. I even had my parents give it a whirl and they failed to unlock with Face ID as well. I really have no concerns over the security of Face ID but hopefully the convineance continues to improve. Maybe version 2.0 will include a lens with a much larger field of view. 
  • Reply 29 of 29
    I like how Touch ID lets me turn on the phone with a single movement before I look at it - such as when it’s in my pocket or beside the bed. The home button also lets me orientate the phone so I always know which is the right way up, even in the dark. I like it’s familiar physicality and find it satisfying to click the little recess of the home button to ‘bring me home’ over and over again. Call me old fashioned but Face ID will never be as good a user experience as the classic home button. 
    baconstang
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