Apple's iOS 11 installed on 59% of compatible devices, up 7% from November

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2017
According to fresh iOS 11 adoption statistics issued by Apple on Tuesday, the company's latest mobile operating system has made its way onto more than half of all supported devices since its release some two and a half months ago.




Announced in an update to Apple's developer web portal, 59 percent of compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch units were running a version of iOS 11 as of Monday.

As usual, Apple's statistics were pulled from iOS App Store visits, painting a more accurate picture of iOS adoption as compared to third-party estimates.

Apple's iOS 11 install base has grown significantly since the last official update in November, which showed the mobile OS on 52 percent of active devices. Apple began sharing iOS 11 adoption statistics on Nov. 6 with data gleaned from the App Store .

The developer resource notes 33 percent of devices visiting the App Store are still running iOS 10, while another 8 percent are on older versions of the OS.

Though the company does not provide day-by-day metrics, the latest iOS 11.2 release pushed out unceremoniously on Saturday, likely drew in a number of new users.

The latest iOS 11 version addresses a date bug discovered last week that causes some iOS devices to enter a soft reset loop. More importantly, iOS 11.2 delivers Apple Pay Cash, Apple's hotly-anticipated peer-to-peer payments feature. After a brief holdup, the service officially went live earlier today

Despite the reasonably strong numbers, iOS 11 adoption trails behind that of its predecessor, which was running on 63 percent of supported devices after its first two and a half months of availability.

Apple released iOS 11 in September alongside a slate of new iPhone products including the new iPhone X flagship. While not a major revision over last year's iOS 10, the new OS contains a slew of under-the-hood feature additions including ARKit, support for the high efficiency H.265 codec, AirPlay 2, Siri improvements and more.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    59% isn't bad considering Google's Oreo 8.1 OS is installed on about 0.3% of all supported Android devices. Fortunately, most Android users don't care which version of OS they're running. It's all good.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 15
    I haven't updated from iOS 10 to 11 for one reason: I'm still using a few 32-bit apps. Some of those old apps are orphans, and will never be updated. I'm slowly finding substitutes and moving my essential data, but I won't update until that process is completed. 

    I suspect the the lag in adopting iOS 11 is in part due to many others still relying on old 32-bit apps. 
    baconstangstudiomusicwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 15
    I haven't updated from iOS 10 to 11 for one reason: I'm still using a few 32-bit apps. Some of those old apps are orphans, and will never be updated. I'm slowly finding substitutes and moving my essential data, but I won't update until that process is completed. 

    I suspect the the lag in adopting iOS 11 is in part due to many others still relying on old 32-bit apps. 
    Indeed I need an iOS 6 iDevice option to run an orphaned essential - so this is 'progress'... Hmmm...
    Why can't I choose my iPhone 4S iOS again ?
  • Reply 4 of 15
    rwesrwes Posts: 151member
    I haven't updated from iOS 10 to 11 for one reason: I'm still using a few 32-bit apps. Some of those old apps are orphans, and will never be updated. I'm slowly finding substitutes and moving my essential data, but I won't update until that process is completed. 

    I suspect the the lag in adopting iOS 11 is in part due to many others still relying on old 32-bit apps. 
    Legitimately curious which 32 bit apps you’re using which haven’t been updated yet? I have two myself,  yhough not  essential, especially with some of the cloud/server side functinality pretty much abandoned/disabled. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 15
    steveausteveau Posts: 168member
    I haven't updated from iOS 10 to 11 for one reason: I'm still using a few 32-bit apps. Some of those old apps are orphans, and will never be updated. I'm slowly finding substitutes and moving my essential data, but I won't update until that process is completed. 

    I suspect the the lag in adopting iOS 11 is in part due to many others still relying on old 32-bit apps. 
    Me too, but I've got an old iPad in good working order that I'm keeping just for those old apps. My concern has been more that iOS 11 has been a bit buggy and I'm waiting to ensure that iOS 11.2 is now a solid option.
    baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 15
    "Announced in an update to Apple's developer web portal, 59 percent of compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch units were running a version of iOS 11 as of Monday. "

    Actually, I'm not very impressed.  As I've said before, Apple FORCES customers onto its latest version of OS-- sometimes to the detriment of the platform (looks at his iPad 2, rendered virtually useless by iOS 9.3.5, which is the ONLY OS Apple will allow me to put on it)

    Similarly I have had an iPhone 4s rendered virtually unable to receive calls, as the phone application takes forever to load under iOS 9.

    As long as you get lucky and don't have to restore your iPhone you'll be fine-- but any kind of OS bug that trashes your memory will force you to load the latest OS release (which is why my iPad is toast)

  • Reply 7 of 15
    Wish I had never upgraded to ios11 on my 7plus. 

    Ive since had many a day where battery life has inexplicably (ie no obvious app cause) been much lower in the evenings than it used to be as well as odd keyboard behaviour that I never had with iOS 10. 

    Also little things like the new pull up control centre not having night shift mode unless I force touch the brightness bar (so obvious Apple - not). Control centre is butt ugly too now. 
    The worst is swiping back on safari I often activate the task manager which is so damn annoying. 

    Fact : my iPhone is less user friendly with ios11

    Overall im not impressed with ios11. I can’t think of a single thing it has given me which is worthy. 

    Sadly it’s also notorious of apple that updates really do slow down old devices no matter what the media infers. Had it happen too many times myself. 

    No obvious way to restore back to ios10 either. As soon as I plug the phone into my Mac it’s already doing a back up. 

    And don’t even get me stared on the hard push to install High Sierra I get every time I use my Mac with a dialogue box that has 2 options - Install Later or More Details.  

    The android model isn’t better mind but Apple’s Practices aren’t that good either. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 8 of 15
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,619member
    I updated my devices over the last few weeks. No real issues other than it made my older iPhone 6 a lot slower, but I upgraded to an X anyway, so that's done.
    However, my wife hates to update to major releases because the UI changes. I can keep her up to date with the "." revs, but once they went from 10.xx to 11 that's it until she upgrades her device. I paid the price a few years ago (I think when they went from iOS6 to iOS7) when the UI was totally revamped. :#
    rare comment
  • Reply 9 of 15
    Lewchenko wrote: "It’s also notorious of apple that updates really do slow down old devices no matter what the media infers." Can you update through major versions of Android with no slow downs then? Or does nobody know because they never install an update? Just wondering.
    watto_cobrapakitt
  • Reply 10 of 15
    In all honesty kiltedgreen, I’ve not owned a modern android phone long enough to receive a major update ! So can’t comment on Android slow downs. 

    Last one I had was an S7 edge. Sold it and swapped back to iPhone before Samsung got the release out the door (typical to wait months after google releases a new major android version)

    Android is not the holy land for sure.

    Judging by ios11 neither is apple.  


    baconstang
  • Reply 11 of 15
    not going to give up my iOS 10 jailbreak for the iOS 11 emojis, and there is probably a small percentage of users in a similar boat
  • Reply 12 of 15
    I haven't updated from iOS 10 to 11 for one reason: I'm still using a few 32-bit apps. Some of those old apps are orphans, and will never be updated. I'm slowly finding substitutes and moving my essential data, but I won't update until that process is completed. 

    I suspect the the lag in adopting iOS 11 is in part due to many others still relying on old 32-bit apps. 
    Indeed I need an iOS 6 iDevice option to run an orphaned essential - so this is 'progress'... Hmmm...
    Why can't I choose my iPhone 4S iOS again ?
    well not everyone is using their phones for Facebook and games only;)
    pakitt
  • Reply 13 of 15
    pakittpakitt Posts: 135member
    When information among users spread that the new iOS release is buggy and hits battery, people don’t update and wait. 
    This is what is happening in the Apple world. 
    I have a few friends and colleagues that cite those 2 reasons for not upgrading. 
    Moreover, with the release of a new iOS, a lot of users with older devices are afraid to be stuck with a slowed down device as it has happened with iOS 9.
    If apple’s policy is to have its user base on one iOS, they need to make sure each release is stable and performing, especially on older supported devices. Maybe with a cut of features. 
    But ios11 has been one of the worst releases so far.  And as long as iOS rushed releases are inexplicably linked to hardware releases, rather than maturity of software, we are not going to see much of an improvement...
  • Reply 14 of 15
    Lewchenko wrote: "It’s also notorious of apple that updates really do slow down old devices no matter what the media infers." Can you update through major versions of Android with no slow downs then? Or does nobody know because they never install an update? Just wondering.

    Yes, from my own personal experience, I can say that there are many Android version upgrades (Jellybean 4.3 to Kitkat 4.4 in Moto G 1st Generation in my wife's phone, Lollipop 5.1 to Marshmallow in my wife's Moto G3) which did NOT slow down the phone at all. There was an odd release from Kitkat to Lollipop (my Moto G2) which made the phone lot worser (slower, unstable etc), but that was a one-off in the last 4 years. This slow-down problem IMMEDIATELY after version upgrade is specific to iOS world only, not there in Android world. There are exceptions due to OEM customizations, but stock/near-stock Android has not degraded performance in old phones.

    In my iPad Air, the situation was totally opposite. With iOS 7, it was near perfect. After upgrading to iOS 8, random restarts were the norm. But slowdown was not noticeable, if there was any. With iOS 9, it was much more stable than iOS 8 ever was, but was slow. It has come to a crawl now, after my daughter accidentally installed iOS 10.

    edited December 2017
  • Reply 15 of 15
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 18,472member
    Lewchenko wrote: "It’s also notorious of apple that updates really do slow down old devices no matter what the media infers." Can you update through major versions of Android with no slow downs then? Or does nobody know because they never install an update? Just wondering.
    What does Android have to do with iOS? Totally honest question. It seems more than a bit silly to wipe away any potential complaint about the OS you use with a "yeah, what about Android LOL". Why would that be your measuring stick, an OS that is widely proclaimed here to be malware-infested, buggy and slow.  Setting expectations low I suppose?
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