Apple releases promised iOS 11.2.1 and tvOS 11.2.1 update, restoring shared HomeKit access...

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2017
Apple has released iOS 11.2.1 and tvOS 11.2.1, with bug fixes and minor changes including restoration of remote access to shared users of the Home app.




The fix to both iOS and tvOS is a restoration of shared Home access, after an issue with HomeKit posed a threat to smart door locks and garage door openers. At the time, Apple implemented a temporary fix by disabling remote HomeKit access to certain users -- which it said would be restored in a future software update.

The update is 68.7MB on an iPhone X, and is available through the normal Software Update function in the iOS Settings menu. Similarly, fourth generation Apple TV or Apple TV 4K owners can get the update through the Settings menu on that platform.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,966member
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
  • Reply 2 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    magman1979chiaequality72521JFC_PA
  • Reply 3 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Sure, bugs can be annoying but at least Apple fixes them rather quickly. Android on the other hand, good luck receiving regular updates. 
    magman1979chiaStrangeDaysmike54
  • Reply 4 of 24
    As long as I do not care about controlling my lights and temperatires using phone, did Apple change as fundametal bugs as Settings crashing on Night Shift attempt to enter to change schedule? This is what happens on 5S (still supported or are we waiting for stopping support?). Also when App Store will reflect proper state of applications to update without need to shut it down and restart? (the number is displayed correctly yet list inside store is empty and shows only previously updated apps available for opening. Yes. Let's focus on bulbs, refrigirator and some advanced stuff... as soon as we get basics fixed. This phone primarily - remote control is not its basic function.
  • Reply 5 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Maybe you need to learn better software developent process. I manage team on this and in Development Operations in finance you have far more complex systems and risky problems. Mind you that on one floor you could be working with processing apps with more code lines than entire Mac OS and iOS. Try that. It requires process. Try to automate testing: unit testing and regression testing properly. Yes we do have offshore teams to do this work so Apple could do this as well. Do you think investment bank has less code than than Apple or Microsoft? Wrong.
    dewme
  • Reply 6 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Maybe you need to learn better software developent process. I manage team on this and in Development Operations in finance you have far more complex systems and risky problems. Mind you that on one floor you could be working with processing apps with more code lines than entire Mac OS and iOS. Try that. It requires process. Try to automate testing: unit testing and regression testing properly. Yes we do have offshore teams to do this work so Apple could do this as well. Do you think investment bank has less code than than Apple or Microsoft? Wrong.
    Ah, you're wrong... iOS and Windows have FAR MORE lines of code than most any other application. That one statement alone shows extreme ignorance.
    StrangeDaysJanNL
  • Reply 7 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,966member
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
  • Reply 8 of 24
    Good gosh. I remember when iOS updates were very infrequent and the software was extremely stable. Now, it seems like I'm reading about a new update every time I visit this website yet I have more frequent app crashes and bugs than ever. As bad as it seems, I would probably "think different" if I switched to an Android device for a while. :)
  • Reply 9 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Maybe you need to learn better software developent process. I manage team on this and in Development Operations in finance you have far more complex systems and risky problems. Mind you that on one floor you could be working with processing apps with more code lines than entire Mac OS and iOS. Try that. It requires process. Try to automate testing: unit testing and regression testing properly. Yes we do have offshore teams to do this work so Apple could do this as well. Do you think investment bank has less code than than Apple or Microsoft? Wrong.
    I don’t need your advice, thanks — I’ve developed software for huge banks (what’s in your wallet?). Every release introduces risk, regardless of your process. If your releases are entirely risk free then your changes are trivial.

    I don’t know which bank you work for but I’d be surprised if it were more lines and complexity than Mac, iOS, Windows, etc.. Impossible to tell tho, I suppose. 
    magman1979chiaJanNL
  • Reply 10 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    edited December 2017 magman1979chia
  • Reply 11 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,966member
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
  • Reply 12 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    chia
  • Reply 13 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Testing is an integral part of software development, and bugs like this should never pass through the security testing stages. I do not remember Apple having this many blunders in such a short time. I am suspecting Apple has finally gave in to big G and is working on backdoors that are causing security issues.
  • Reply 14 of 24
    chiachia Posts: 698member
    I'm amused by the spectacle of someone failing to use the process of automatic spellchecking offered by their device to catch spelling mistakes in their brief posts, chastising Apple's development process on far lengthier and complex code.

    As long as I do not care about controlling my lights and temperatires using phone, did Apple change as fundametal bugs as Settings crashing on Night Shift attempt to enter to change schedule? This is what happens on 5S (still supported or are we waiting for stopping support?). Also when App Store will reflect proper state of applications to update without need to shut it down and restart? (the number is displayed correctly yet list inside store is empty and shows only previously updated apps available for opening. Yes. Let's focus on bulbs, refrigirator and some advanced stuff... as soon as we get basics fixed. This phone primarily - remote control is not its basic function.
    Maybe you need to learn better software
    developent process. I manage team on this and in Development Operations in finance you have far more complex systems and risky problems. Mind you that on one floor you could be working with processing apps with more code lines than entire Mac OS and iOS. Try that. It requires process.
    StrangeDaysretrogusto
  • Reply 15 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Testing is an integral part of software development, and bugs like this should never pass through the security testing stages. I do not remember Apple having this many blunders in such a short time. I am suspecting Apple has finally gave in to big G and is working on backdoors that are causing security issues.
    "But bugs shouldn't happen!!" -- you. Really. That's all that you've said here.

    I don't care how perfect the software you write in your mind is (I'm betting you've never written anything IRL), bugs do happen. And again -- it's not because some obvious test was missed. It's because in complex systems things affect other things in unexpected ways.

    Let that soak in. Bugs happen because things affect other things in unexpected ways. 

    If you doubt this, please, by all means, become a software developer. Shine the light on what we're all doing wrong. Amaze us with your new company that is the first in history to release bug-free software. Reap the rewards of changing the course of technology with your bug-free approach to producing millions and millions of lines of code in complex, inter-operating systems. 

    chia
  • Reply 16 of 24

    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Testing is an integral part of software development, and bugs like this should never pass through the security testing stages. I do not remember Apple having this many blunders in such a short time. I am suspecting Apple has finally gave in to big G and is working on backdoors that are causing security issues.
    This deserves its own reply. That is the stupidest thing I have read all week.
  • Reply 17 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,966member
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Your logic is wrong.  And you never worked with real QA people. You are stretching things about testing.  Testing does not promise to cover every thing. Of course it is not possible to catch every thing. But this does not tests cannot find breaking of existing behavior. Because an existing behavior may already have tests created before. A show stopper is just like that.  A software release may cause a test to fail while it was working in previous releases. 
  • Reply 18 of 24
    jdwjdw Posts: 742member
    Yes, but does 11.2.1 restore my battery life to what it was prior to my having installed 11.2?  With 11.2, I only get 3 hours 45 minutes of usable battery life.  I have friends who've told me the same after installing 11.2 on their iPhone 7's.  
  • Reply 19 of 24
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Your logic is wrong.  And you never worked with real QA people. You are stretching things about testing.  Testing does not promise to cover every thing. Of course it is not possible to catch every thing. But this does not tests cannot find breaking of existing behavior. Because an existing behavior may already have tests created before. A show stopper is just like that.  A software release may cause a test to fail while it was working in previous releases. 
    My logic isn’t wrong, this what I’ve done for twenty years. You know, as a career. I’ve worked for Webby-winning dot com bubble websites, fortune 100 and 500 companies, household brands, banks, energy companies, local and federal govs. And you’ve refuted nothing of what I’ve shared with you — bugs happens because things affect other things in unexpected ways, and you cannot have tests in place for every single possible thing that could go wrong. Not possible. 

    But you're butthurt that a bug exists, for something I’m willing to bet didn’t even affect you. Did it?
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 20 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,966member
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    This is at least the second time Apple altered iPhone behavior then was forced to restore it.  Apple is lacking key person who really understand how iPhone should function. 
    Ah yes, they need one person to prevent any bug from existing in millions of lines of code. Of course.

    Sorry bro, but that isn't how software works. I'm on a much smaller endeavor with a much smaller team, and every new release and change introduces risk. Unforeseen things happen because humans. There will never be a day when software exists free of bugs. And even if Apple were to implement a feature freeze to fix all bugs, besides being impossible it would take years and then you'd be whining about "Apple is stagnant!" etc.

    Just deal with the reality and stop expecting Apple to obtain some unachievable level of perfection.
    Your personal endeavor is too little in scale.  You seem have never heard about product validation. 
    Nonsense, you’ve just failed to comprehend the point being made — that even smaller software endeavors introduce risk, let alone the larger endeavors (which I’ve also been a part of) such as entire operating systems like iOS and macOS. 

    You don't work with software, do you?

    But I get it...if you did work in software, your releases would be perfect! The best! You’d MAKE SOFTWARE GREAT AGAIN!
    Even you have larger endeavors the product validation person must be fooling around. In production validation a new software release must not alter existing behavior. This kind of bug is called show stopper. 
    No. Again, you have very little understand of how software development works. In the majority of cases, a bug is not because some QA guy was screwing around and failed to try something. Bugs happen due to complexity, and unexpected ramifications. There are so many moving parts in modern software systems that it's impossible to test for and catch every single thing, and sometimes the ways a change touches other aspects of the system are unexpected. This is just fact. You can't write automated tests to catch every possible variable and scenario. It is impossible. If it were possible, we wouldn't have bugs, ever. 

    You can't pretend your away around this. The mere fact that change releases can and do alter existing behavior is why we have software developers, support developers, QA developers, etc. Your attempts at over-simplification of how software developer works are just wishful thinking.
    Your logic is wrong.  And you never worked with real QA people. You are stretching things about testing.  Testing does not promise to cover every thing. Of course it is not possible to catch every thing. But this does not tests cannot find breaking of existing behavior. Because an existing behavior may already have tests created before. A show stopper is just like that.  A software release may cause a test to fail while it was working in previous releases. 
    My logic isn’t wrong, this what I’ve done for twenty years. You know, as a career. I’ve worked for Webby-winning dot com bubble websites, fortune 100 and 500 companies, household brands, banks, energy companies, local and federal govs. And you’ve refuted nothing of what I’ve shared with you — bugs happens because things affect other things in unexpected ways, and you cannot have tests in place for every single possible thing that could go wrong. Not possible. 

    But you're butthurt that a bug exists, for something I’m willing to bet didn’t even affect you. Did it?
    I have not refuted that bugs happens and you cannot have tests for every single possible thing.  But your logic is because of this reason Apple is allowed to break remote access to shared users of the Home app. This is wrong.
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