Amazon discontinues its iTunes Match competitor that stored up to 250,000 songs in the clo...

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited December 2017
Users looking to consolidate all of their legacy music purchases in a single cloud-based service will have one less option come mid-January, as Amazon has announced it will discontinue its song matching and uploading capability.




Both free and paid plans for the the Amazon Music Storage Subscription service will no longer be offered after Jan. 15, 2018. The service itself will remain active for subscribers, allowing them to stream or download their matched songs, until January 2019.

The cloud storage option was a direct competitor to Apple's own iTunes Match. It launched in July of 2012 for $24.99 per year, but at the time offered 10 times as many matched tracks -- 250,000 -- as iTunes Match.

In the years since, Apple has expanded the limit for song matching beyond 25,000, while retaining the same $24.99 price.

The discontinuation of Amazon Music Storage Subscription was first noted by Slashgear.




Matching services offer cloud-based storage of songs that may have been ripped from CDs, purchased from competing online stores, or even obtained through illegal means. Though Apple still offers iTunes Match subscriptions separately, it has also rolled the matching functionality into its $9.99-per-month Apple Music service, which also includes unlimited streaming.

In a notice to its website, Amazon explains that music purchased from Amazon, including MP3s and AutoRip CDs, will remain stored in the cloud for both playback and download. The change only affects matched songs that were not purchased from Amazon -- such as tracks that may have been bought from iTunes.

The cancelation affects both the free 250-song tier and the paid 250,000-song service. Free users can no longer upload songs, while paid subscribers will be able to do so until their subscription ends.

Amazon continues to offer its Music Unlimited service, which competes with the likes of Apple Music and Spotify. With those, customers pay an ongoing monthly fee for the ability to stream and download songs, but they do not own the tracks, and access to them is removed if the subscription is canceled.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 38
    Wait, so you mean copying anything Apple does regardless of your own business model isn't a path to success?
    coolfactorwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 38
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,515member
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    fasterquietercoolfactorwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 38
    Probably part of the deal to get Apple TV back on Amazon’s shelves. Man, Apple drive a hard bargain! /s
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,043member
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 5 of 38
    chiachia Posts: 681member
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head.

    Google Reader https://www.google.com/reader/about/

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Reader
  • Reply 6 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,043member
    chia said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head.

    Google Reader https://www.google.com/reader/about/

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Reader
    Ah, you're right, I forgot about that one and yup it was certainly used. While Reader was discontinued the reading material was not tho. They rolled it into Google Now so instead of pulling specific sources it pulls categories of interest. TBH I prefer it that way as I get more varied angles on the news instead of single source.

    Thanks. :)
    edited December 2017 chia
  • Reply 7 of 38
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,040member
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)


    edited December 2017 racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,043member
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)


    Neither Wave nor Buzz was anything terribly popular nor depended on were they? And those morphed into Google Now.  I'm not familiar with the third one you mentioned so I'd guess it was the same with that, simply a trial service, perhaps rolled up in something else now if it had any worth? FWIW the Amazon song match may not have had much interest either. Even Apple for all intents discontinued theirs and rolled it up as simply a minor included feature of Apple Music if I'm understanding correctly ( I tried Apple music and don't recall now what some of the features were)? Is anyone even buying songs anymore? 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 9 of 38
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,202member
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)
    @MacPro can define "lot" any way he wishes but in terms of a Google service and what I consider even a moderately popular service those were abject failures. You might as well say Apple's Ping was used by "lots of people" when it was dumped since we define it mean pretty much anything we want.
    edited December 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 38
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,294member
    This very scenario is what makes me a bit leery about buying movies from online services. I have purchased movies from iTunes, Amazon, and VuDu over the last few years. What happens if one of these companies decides to get out of the movie business for whatever reason? What happens to my ‘purchased’ products? 
    randominternetpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 38
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,115member
    lkrupp said:
    This very scenario is what makes me a bit leery about buying movies from online services. I have purchased movies from iTunes, Amazon, and VuDu over the last few years. What happens if one of these companies decides to get out of the movie business for whatever reason? What happens to my ‘purchased’ products? 
    I think the answer is that you can no longer access them. I also think this is in their terms of service, but I can't remember, as I've read so many of them lately.

    My recollection of movie "purchase" sites like VUDU and Amazon is that you don't actually download a local copy. iTunes offers that option.

    I did not know the Apple Music subscription included the iTunes match service. I suppose this makes intuitive sense, but my recollection of the iTunes Match service was that it uploaded anything it couldn't find in it's existing Apple catalog. So, if you subscribe to Apple Music, then drop that subscription for any reason, it deletes what was uploaded? Admittedly a very esoteric point.

    I saw you can get an 8TB drive for $150. Seems like maybe there is a homegrown solution to this. Plex likely does it, but I saw subscription fees and moved on. Maybe there is a free version.
  • Reply 12 of 38
    lkrupp said:
    This very scenario is what makes me a bit leery about buying movies from online services. I have purchased movies from iTunes, Amazon, and VuDu over the last few years. What happens if one of these companies decides to get out of the movie business for whatever reason? What happens to my ‘purchased’ products? 
    This very thing happened to me when Target discontinued their digital movies downloads store. My content just migrated to another provider, though (Vudu or somebody).
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 13 of 38
    lkrupp said:
    This very scenario is what makes me a bit leery about buying movies from online services. I have purchased movies from iTunes, Amazon, and VuDu over the last few years. What happens if one of these companies decides to get out of the movie business for whatever reason? What happens to my ‘purchased’ products? 
    That's one of the reasons why I still prefer physical media. You technically don't own the digital movies you purchase. I would imagine if iTunes went out of business, there would be a cut off date to download movies. Not sure how that would work with Vudu since offline movies work a little differently compared to iTunes. 
  • Reply 14 of 38
    thisisasj said:
    lkrupp said:
    This very scenario is what makes me a bit leery about buying movies from online services. I have purchased movies from iTunes, Amazon, and VuDu over the last few years. What happens if one of these companies decides to get out of the movie business for whatever reason? What happens to my ‘purchased’ products? 
    This very thing happened to me when Target discontinued their digital movies downloads store. My content just migrated to another provider, though (Vudu or somebody).
    That's happening now with Flixster.
  • Reply 15 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,043member
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)
    @MacPro can define "lot" any way he wishes but in terms of a Google service and what I consider even a moderately popular service those were abject failures. You might as well say Apple's Ping was used by "lots of people" when it was dumped since we define it mean pretty much anything we want.
    I largely agree, but for one point: Buzz and Wave I wouldn't count yet as abject failures since they led to Google+, which I won't deny may end up being dumped too. I don't use Facebook or Google+ so I wouldn't miss it if it went away. IMHO it would benefit society as a whole if Facebook too disappeared, but that's just me. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 38
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,294member
    eightzero said:
    I did not know the Apple Music subscription included the iTunes match service. I suppose this makes intuitive sense, but my recollection of the iTunes Match service was that it uploaded anything it couldn't find in it's existing Apple catalog. 
    I’m not so sure an Apple Music subscription includes iTunes Match services. Serenity Caldwell wrote a really good article about this and she seemed to indicate otherwise. Apple Music will match songs in your library but will not upload them if no match is found. So if you have a number of CDs ripped that aren’t found in the store you will need iTunes Match to get them uploaded.
  • Reply 17 of 38
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,202member
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)
    @MacPro can define "lot" any way he wishes but in terms of a Google service and what I consider even a moderately popular service those were abject failures. You might as well say Apple's Ping was used by "lots of people" when it was dumped since we define it mean pretty much anything we want.
    I largely agree, but for one point: Buzz and Wave I wouldn't count yet as abject failures since they led to Google+, which I won't deny may end up being dumped too. I don't use Facebook or Google+ so I wouldn't miss it if it went away. IMHO it would benefit society as a whole if Facebook too disappeared, but that's just me. 
    It’s anecdotal, but I don’t know of anyone—literally not a single person—that uses Google+ (or Google Hangouts).
    edited December 2017 watto_cobrapmb01
  • Reply 18 of 38
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,548member
    Soli said:
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    MacPro said:
    Seems more like Google to offer a service, wait until lots of people use it / depend on it, then announce their dropping it.  
    Not trying to be obtuse, so getting that out of the way, but what Google service that "lots of people depended on" has been abandoned? Serious question. There's always going to be experimental features that some small number of folks might use and like that Google doesn't decide to stick with. I can't think of anything important off the top of my head. 

    Amazon dropping this seems a bit surprising IMO. I guess Amazon is in the process of changing some of their market strategies, with stuff like the Whole Foods purchase and their new plans for an online drug store? Perhaps the "free services" are being phased out? 
    Off the top of my head:
    Google Wave
    Google Buzz
    Google Knol

    There was also a good rather interesting Quicksilver clone that they took over and then canned. 

    On the development side side it can also get rather annoying because they went from Angular1 to Angular2 and the new version was so incompatible that developers reckoned that Angular had been discontinued and then a new product was given the same name to avoid the backlash. The new version was much better, but it should have been renamed. 

    To be honest though, you get what you pay for, and Google has never hidden the fact that everything they do is considered beta and so could be dropped at any moment. 

    This is is why I tend not to rely on any of their services (that, and the raiding of customer data, oh and the whole “tracking when I asked you not to” thing.)
    @MacPro can define "lot" any way he wishes but in terms of a Google service and what I consider even a moderately popular service those were abject failures. You might as well say Apple's Ping was used by "lots of people" when it was dumped since we define it mean pretty much anything we want.
    I largely agree, but for one point: Buzz and Wave I wouldn't count yet as abject failures since they led to Google+, which I won't deny may end up being dumped too. I don't use Facebook or Google+ so I wouldn't miss it if it went away. IMHO it would benefit society as a whole if Facebook too disappeared, but that's just me. 
    It’s anecdotal, but I don’t know of anyone—literally not a single person—that uses Google+ (or Google Hangouts).
    My work will be transitioning to Google everything in the next year or so. So I can’t say that anymore. 

  • Reply 19 of 38
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,548member
    If Apple killed a service like this, analysts will declare it a harbinger of Apple’s impending doom. For everyone else, it’s a “good decision.”
    SoliMetriacanthosauruswatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 38
    This is a real problem, and it's why I will never get involved with any other (than Apple) company's services for anything important. Because a company that treats their users as the product like Amazon or Google can, will, and do simply turn off services that users depend on, after they are no longer any use to the company.

    If Apple simply canceled iTunes Match tomorrow and said you have a year to deal with it, it would be an atomic bomb.
    randominternetpersonwatto_cobra
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