Extreme OLED test finds Apple's iPhone X takes much longer to 'burn in' images than Samsun...

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 27
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,961member

    Rayz2016 said:
    So has this always been a problem, or did it just become a problem when Apple moved to OLED panels?
    It has always been...but became "a problem" once apple started using the tech.
    Well yes, it’s always been a problem, though, except for LG’s screen for some reason, it’s been getting better. But Apple’s tech seems to have worked around the worst of it, at least for the length of the tests.

    but I haven’t read a single complain so far if burn-in with Apple’s Phone, just some questions about whether it can happen.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 27
    Rayz2016 said:
    So has this always been a problem, or did it just become a problem when Apple moved to OLED panels?
    LCDs do burn in, despite claims to the contrary. Plasma displays were notorious for this (as were CRT), but Apple never used those in any of its products.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 27
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,136member
    I have seen horrible burn-ins in Android phones in real life. The owner still uses it until today and insisted that it is not a problem even after I pointed out that I hardly could read any text on its screen. Android users generally don't take burn-ins problem seriously, well, until iPhone. I could imagine lawsuits as many as the ones with recent old battery issue if it happened to Apple a few years later, wishing for $29 screen replacement.
    watto_cobraanton zuykov
  • Reply 24 of 27
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,821member
    Rayz2016 said:
    So has this always been a problem, or did it just become a problem when Apple moved to OLED panels?

    This only happened when Apple moved to OLED./s Smartphone screen burn-in really wasn't much talked about before. All that mattered was that Samsung's superior display smartphones were absolutely brilliant and vibrant. Much, much more so than the iPhone's dull and lifeless LCD display. Who cares about burn-in when the display is easily seen in bright daylight. If burn-in occurs then it's high time to buy the latest Samsung Galaxy S or Note.

    The way I see it, certain natural things become more or less important once Apple does it. Things that have been happening for years will suddenly rear their ugly heads if it shows up on an Apple product. Apple is always under that microscope and something nasty is definitely going to be found. Apple had better find the solution to change the laws of physics because even if something is a natural cause, Apple is going to be held responsible. If a Samsung OLED display goes bad in an Apple product, Apple is going to be held at fault and not Samsung. Why? Because Apple is expected to meet the highest possible standards, no matter how unreasonable that may be.

    It makes some sense that if a smartphone's OLED display doesn't burn as bright, it won't burn in as fast.  I've always kept my computer displays brightness lower to try to avoid that.  I always used screen-savers and early display sleep mode to stop burn-in.  But if Apple doesn't want early burn-in then they would be wise to cut back on that brightness.  Some critics will complain that the iPhone X display isn't as good-looking as the Galaxy S8 or Note 8.  That's a bad Apple.
    I would like to see them compared to LG's screen used on the Pixel 2XL.   Its supposed to be worse than the Samsung screens.   Android Authority has a story on 10 problems that phone has.    
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 27
    lkrupp said:
    Apple may be using Samsung’s OLED display technology but it appears their software management of it is superior. Just like Apple’s software management of batteries to prevent sudden shutdowns. Could it be that Apple really does care about the customer experience?
    ...except it's not an off-the-shelf Samsung OLED panel. As with anything Sammy builds for Apple, it's built according to Apple's design schematics. It's a combination of superior OLED panel design, and the iPhone's software management. That's why I believe the LG-supplied OLED panels for iPhones will be light-years better than what we're seeing on the Pixel XL 2, and other LG OLED phones with subpar display quality. 
  • Reply 26 of 27
    Rayz2016 said:
    So has this always been a problem, or did it just become a problem when Apple moved to OLED panels?

    So you're suggesting the limitations of a certain technology are always present in any brand that uses it? Outrageous!
  • Reply 27 of 27
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,961member
    lkrupp said:
    Apple may be using Samsung’s OLED display technology but it appears their software management of it is superior. Just like Apple’s software management of batteries to prevent sudden shutdowns. Could it be that Apple really does care about the customer experience?
    ...except it's not an off-the-shelf Samsung OLED panel. As with anything Sammy builds for Apple, it's built according to Apple's design schematics. It's a combination of superior OLED panel design, and the iPhone's software management. That's why I believe the LG-supplied OLED panels for iPhones will be light-years better than what we're seeing on the Pixel XL 2, and other LG OLED phones with subpar display quality. 
    I hope that’s true. But there could be problems with LG’s quality control, or simply that their equipment isn’t capable of producing consistent results within a panel. If Apple is going to use them, and at least from what we’re reading, Apple does want to use them, then I hope that Apple and LG will improve their manufacturing so that what we see with their screens today, isn’t what we’ll see with Apple’s screens.

    and while we see glowing reviews of their OLED TVs, and TVs from other manufacturers, all of whom use Lg’s Screens,I’ve seen the same kinds of irregularities across a grey screen that I’m seeing with the Pixel 2 XL screen.
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