French government investigates planned obsolescence allegations amidst iPhone slowdown con...

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 27
    78Bandit said:
    I firmly believe this issue is the result of incompetence by some Apple engineers and not some grand conspiracy to force devices to be unusable.  If Apple had included the code in iOS to begin with the argument would have a little more weight, but ultimately the throttling was implemented after multiple users complained of unexpected shutdowns.  This was a bandaid fix to a flawed design.  For whatever unknown reason the iPhone 6 and later need more voltage than the battery can supply under normal operating conditions when the battery is only slightly degraded.  If Apple was planning on "encouraging" upgrades they certainly could have found a much better way to do so.
    Design flaw, eh? Is that what you call it when your aging car battery won't crank in winter (or summer)? No? How come that's not a design flaw but this is? Same problem.
    Ridiculous comparison - a garage/manufacturer will tell you to change the battery. Apple didn't, they don't tell you anything technical about the phone really - so for most it just seemed like the phone "as a whole" was slowing down with no other option than to upgrade. The only user-friendly option of wiping and reloading a fresh iOS made no difference. Several months later, many have now found out that a $29 service would have cured all the issues instead of an $800 upgrade and are rightfully a little bit pissed off.

    I don't think it was "planned obsolesce" as charged but it's certainly a major error not to make the customer more aware and has led to what we have today. 

    We got rid of 2x 6Ss because of the slowness, had I known what I know now I would certainly have held onto them and had the batteries serviced - if anything even to improve resell value, I honestly sold my 6S noting the slowness and crashing issues getting less than market value at the time.
  • Reply 22 of 27
    adm1 said:
    Ridiculous comparison - a garage/manufacturer will tell you to change the battery. Apple didn't, they don't tell you anything technical about the phone really - so for most it just seemed like the phone "as a whole" was slowing down with no other option than to upgrade. The only user-friendly option of wiping and reloading a fresh iOS made no difference. Several months later, many have now found out that a $29 service would have cured all the issues instead of an $800 upgrade and are rightfully a little bit pissed off.
    Apple always provided battery tests and info about what the life expectancy of the battery was (500 charge cycles/80% capacity). Is there something unusual about that charge/capacity rating vs. the rest of the industry? No. And unless your battery met those replacement requirements, it's unlikely that changing the battery would do anything other than increase capacity. Troubleshooting steps that don't involve the battery are more likely to work if the battery isn't due to be replaced. There's nothing misleading or uninformative about that.
  • Reply 23 of 27
    I’m really happy about Apple getting smacked around so much lately.

    I’ve been a Mac Addict since before issue #1.  Had Performas, Power PCs, G3s, etc etc until the 2016 MacBook Pro (the last of what you can really call a Pro).  I’ve concurrently used PCs but always preferred the Mac.

    Apple has been screwing up a lot lately, and I think they need to loose the championship belt for a while, go back into training, and hopefully come back rejuvenated.

    i really like Windows lately, and Android seems to be catching up in software usability.  My next phone might be an Android.

    i wish this site wasn’t so apologetic and defensive about it.  I always preferred As The Apple Turns but since it shut down I’ve been a regular at AppleInsider.

    It would be nice if the Apple “Insider” actually would leak some dirty secrets, not just hype about the next way to make Apple money.
  • Reply 24 of 27
    Oh, and step #1 is to fire their current CEO, and tell him to take his politics with him.
  • Reply 25 of 27
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,584member
    tmay said:
    feudalist said:
    entropys said:
    Wouldn’t old phones that suddenly shut down be more likely to prompt a new phone purchase? This software management is more likely to enable people to limp along with the old phone that little bit longer
    No sir. When shutdown happens, user have clear indication whats wrong. In warranty, after warranty go for new battery. Done. 

    But, what to do with slow phone? Go for new one because at time nobody knows nothing about real issue. I don’t think that’s planned obsolescence, but sh..y customer service it is. 
    You would think that no iPhone owner had ever used Google to, you know, search to find out why his iPhone had slowed down or was failing


    Reading thru some discussion threads there's days I'm convinced almost no one uses Google to, you know, search up a few facts before posting. :/
    jony0muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 26 of 27
    adm1 said:
    Ridiculous comparison - a garage/manufacturer will tell you to change the battery. Apple didn't, they don't tell you anything technical about the phone really - so for most it just seemed like the phone "as a whole" was slowing down with no other option than to upgrade. The only user-friendly option of wiping and reloading a fresh iOS made no difference. Several months later, many have now found out that a $29 service would have cured all the issues instead of an $800 upgrade and are rightfully a little bit pissed off.
    Apple always provided battery tests and info about what the life expectancy of the battery was (500 charge cycles/80% capacity). Is there something unusual about that charge/capacity rating vs. the rest of the industry? No. And unless your battery met those replacement requirements, it's unlikely that changing the battery would do anything other than increase capacity. Troubleshooting steps that don't involve the battery are more likely to work if the battery isn't due to be replaced. There's nothing misleading or uninformative about that.

    Throtling was introduced in iOS 10.2.1 specificly for 6s, after unsuccessful recall. it was January 2017. So roughly 120 days old iphone 6s on that day has to be fully charged/discharged 4 times a day every single day after purchase. Really? Really?  Math is powerfull.
  • Reply 27 of 27
    feudalist said:
    adm1 said:
    Ridiculous comparison - a garage/manufacturer will tell you to change the battery. Apple didn't, they don't tell you anything technical about the phone really - so for most it just seemed like the phone "as a whole" was slowing down with no other option than to upgrade. The only user-friendly option of wiping and reloading a fresh iOS made no difference. Several months later, many have now found out that a $29 service would have cured all the issues instead of an $800 upgrade and are rightfully a little bit pissed off.
    Apple always provided battery tests and info about what the life expectancy of the battery was (500 charge cycles/80% capacity). Is there something unusual about that charge/capacity rating vs. the rest of the industry? No. And unless your battery met those replacement requirements, it's unlikely that changing the battery would do anything other than increase capacity. Troubleshooting steps that don't involve the battery are more likely to work if the battery isn't due to be replaced. There's nothing misleading or uninformative about that.

    Throtling was introduced in iOS 10.2.1 specificly for 6s, after unsuccessful recall. it was January 2017. So roughly 120 days old iphone 6s on that day has to be fully charged/discharged 4 times a day every single day after purchase. Really? Really?  Math is powerfull.

    I guess you got the launch year of iPhone 6s/6s Plus wrong. Even an average user who bought the iPhone 6s in Sep-30-2015 would have easily went through 500 charge cycles by the time iOS 10.2.1 was introduced in Jan-2017. A heavy user who charges his/her iPhone 6s twice a day would have gone through even 1000 charge cycles.
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