Opposed by Apple, 'right to repair' bills nonetheless pile up in state capitols

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 25
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,627member
    This is dumb. What happens when an average Joe tries to repair something and it goes badly wrong? Then is Apple going to be stuck trying to fix or have to provide a replacement device? Governments should stay out of this.

    I don't think Apple would be held responsible if third party repair messes up with the device. I remember someone sharing the link for the contents of this proposal earlier. We need to read it before commenting based on the title of this article.


    Edit: It was @SpaceRays who shared the link earlier. http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/105/PDF/Intro/LB67.pdf I would request all of the people to go through this before commenting on this topic, because many questions/concerns are already addressed in the proposed bill.

    Then you don’t know how lawyers work. You go after the deep pockets which would be Apple. You file in a state/county that likes to give money away to plaintiffs, like that district in Texas that almost always finds for the plaintiff. You spin things so that Apple likes the bad guy. For example you assert that Apple’s repair services are exorbitantly expensive thus forcing your client to go with a third party repair service. Therefore Apple is liable for any damage caused by the third party service. And the jury will buy it hook, line, and sinker.

    I did take the time to scan through the proposed legislation and the first thing my eye caught was the “fair and equitable” pricing, in other words, government oversight and regulation of repair prices. Then there’s complete and total exemption of the automotive industry from the act. I also noted the requirements for the manufacturer to provide diagnostic tools AND equipment. Oh, and the part about not excluding security related parts, diagnostic tools for said security related parts. Wow, just wow.
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 22 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,300member
    georgie01 said:
    It seems to me that forcing Apple (and other manufacturers) to basically support repairs they have no control over will ultimately hurt Apple’s reputation—substandard repairs will negatively impact people’s perception of the product. Even if someone thinks a repair is good enough for themselves it still takes Apple’s control over their reputation out of their own hands. On the surface it seems like a nice idea to give consumers options, but it’s also questionable.
    Why would a fail by some 3rd party repair facility affect the perception of Apple product quality? Don't folks get other products repaired at non-factory service shops or even by themselves if they feel particularly froggy? 

    I was in a laptop repair shop late last week to get a screen replacement and they had one Mac and at least one MacBook being serviced at one of the technicians stations and they are not an official Apple licensed shop. I doubt something they might do there will reflect on Apple either positively or negatively. The rep is that of the store rather than Apple. If you live an hour or two (or more) away from an Apple Store why should you not have the option of having your product repaired at a 3rd party shop if you trust them with it? 
    edited January 2018 muthuk_vanalingamavon b7
  • Reply 23 of 25
    lkrupp said:
    This is dumb. What happens when an average Joe tries to repair something and it goes badly wrong? Then is Apple going to be stuck trying to fix or have to provide a replacement device? Governments should stay out of this.

    I don't think Apple would be held responsible if third party repair messes up with the device. I remember someone sharing the link for the contents of this proposal earlier. We need to read it before commenting based on the title of this article.


    Edit: It was @SpaceRays who shared the link earlier. http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/105/PDF/Intro/LB67.pdf I would request all of the people to go through this before commenting on this topic, because many questions/concerns are already addressed in the proposed bill.

    Then you don’t know how lawyers work. You go after the deep pockets which would be Apple. You file in a state/county that likes to give money away to plaintiffs, like that district in Texas that almost always finds for the plaintiff. You spin things so that Apple likes the bad guy. For example you assert that Apple’s repair services are exorbitantly expensive thus forcing your client to go with a third party repair service. Therefore Apple is liable for any damage caused by the third party service. And the jury will buy it hook, line, and sinker.

    I did take the time to scan through the proposed legislation and the first thing my eye caught was the “fair and equitable” pricing, in other words, government oversight and regulation of repair prices. Then there’s complete and total exemption of the automotive industry from the act. I also noted the requirements for the manufacturer to provide diagnostic tools AND equipment. Oh, and the part about not excluding security related parts, diagnostic tools for said security related parts. Wow, just wow.

    Once the bill clearly laid out who is "responsible" if something goes wrong with the repair, how do you think Apple would NOT be in a position to defend itself in the courts? Are Apple's lawyers THAT BAD? I don't think so. Regarding the other aspects of the bill - They are applicable to ALL OEMs (including Samsung, LG etc) who are doing a terrible job in after-sales support. So this bill should ideally hit them lot more than Apple who is doing a fantastic job in after-sales support. At least, that is what I thought. When the rules are equal to ALL OEMs, what is the problem? Everyone should comply with them, isn't it?
  • Reply 24 of 25
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    crosslad said:
    My son-in-law recently had the battery replaced in his iPhone 6 at a local, while you wait shop. I asked if he had seen an improvement the performance of his phone, he said no. I suggested he installed a battery testing app, which he did. The app showed that his battery was at 69% efficiency after just a couple of months. This is what you get at non approved repair shops. 
    Often they either don't replace the battery or put some shit battery in, you then get what he got.
  • Reply 25 of 25
    I’d be happy with a slightly thicker phone if I could easily swap the screen or change the battery. It would bring a lot of peace mind. I recently changed the battery in my son’s 5S. Removing the old battery was insanely hard. It was creased into a ball by the time I’d finally pried it off the glue.
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