IT pros will be able to delay Apple updates for 90 days with iOS 11.3, macOS 10.13.4

Posted:
in iOS
Apple has added a new variable for device management, allowing supervised iPhones, iPads, and Macs to put off upgrading to a new version of the system software for up to 90 days.




A new "enforcedSoftwareUpdateDelay" configuration profile setting allows a device management administrator to configure how many days an update will be delayed. With the restriction in place, users of the managed devices won't even see the update until the specified number of days has elapsed.

The default for the setting in both iOS 11.3 and macOS High Sierra 10.13.4 is off. Once enabled, it is set for 30 days, and cam be maxed out at 90 days.

It is not clear at present what this means for Apple's signing windows on new iOS releases, if anything at all. It is not likely that the setting will migrate to unmanaged devices, given Apple's stance on OS updates.

The addition was first spotted by EnterpriseiOS shortly after the beta for iOS 11.3 and macOS 11.13.4 went live.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Unlike Windows, I didn't know MacOS forced an update on a user?
  • Reply 2 of 11
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,940member
    I presume this feature will be included in the new macOS Server product demonstrating Apple's desire/commitment to change the Server product into more of a device management product.
  • Reply 3 of 11
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,641member
    deminsd said:
    Unlike Windows, I didn't know MacOS forced an update on a user?
    It doesn't...but it will keep bothering you about updates, or putting the number of updates on the App Store icon in the dock. There are times when I don't want my users updating because I haven't tested the update and I don't know what it does or doesn't do. Its not always best to have the latest and greatest installed 24/7.
    rob53baconstangdouglas baileyanantksundaram
  • Reply 4 of 11
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,764member
    deminsd said:
    Unlike Windows, I didn't know MacOS forced an update on a user?
    It doesn't, but many companies/institutions would not want their users updating until all of their apps and tools have been tested using the updated OS.
    kingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 5 of 11
    Can’t wait for 11.3 ... and HomePod. 
  • Reply 6 of 11
    deminsd said:
    Unlike Windows, I didn't know MacOS forced an update on a user?
    It is quite persistent with nagging, and when students are prompted with updates they will often do it, disrupting their classtime along with creating problems due to compatibility dependencies of existing apps.
    anantksundaram
  • Reply 7 of 11
    Good. There’ll be more to come. 

    Now, offer it for your regular customers too. No excuse not to, Apple. 
  • Reply 8 of 11
    chasmchasm Posts: 997member
    Apple doesn’t force upgrades, but it does prevent downgrading after a short period.
  • Reply 9 of 11
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,968member
    deminsd said:
    Unlike Windows, I didn't know MacOS forced an update on a user?
    It is quite persistent with nagging, and when students are prompted with updates they will often do it, disrupting their classtime along with creating problems due to compatibility dependencies of existing apps.
    Why are you giving students administrator accounts?
  • Reply 10 of 11
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,968member

    Good. There’ll be more to come. 

    Now, offer it for your regular customers too. No excuse not to, Apple. 
    This feature is for people administrating other users' devices. Why would regular customers need this feature?
  • Reply 11 of 11
    Why are you giving students administrator accounts?
    I give my children admin accounts. Not because I want to but because they need to be able to update WiFi settings’s and occasionally install software when they go to a computing class (out of school). If a WiFi hotspot password changes they need admin rights to update it. Sadly macOS Just doesn’t provide enough granularity to make it feasible to remove admin rights or even to use parental controls. We have similar issues with iOS which blocks all https access when setting parental controls for web browsing. This stops them doing their homework or accessing the school’s web site so it’s unusable in practice. Many argue that parents should be closely supervising their children on line. I suspect these are mostly non-parents. For many of us life isn’t that easy.
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