Apple employees can buy HomePod at half price for limited time

13

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 76
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 224member
    dachar said:
    I wonder if Apple is about to shake up the hi fi speaker market just like they have done before with other products? What seems to be a potential game changer is incorporating computer hardware and software into a mass market speaker as opposed to super expensive gear. Will there be a whole range of Apple HomePod speakers in 3 years time?
    Show me where Apple uses the term 'HiFi'?

  • Reply 42 of 76
    bitmod said:
    leighr said:
    Cost is a relative thing. Perhaps Apple would have been better to introduce HomePod at $175 in order to firstly gain market share, and then move up to premium HomePodPro models. They couldn’t drop the quality though, people expect poor quality from Google and Samsung, even Amazon, but poor quality from Apple would not be tolerated, so it would have to be the same model, but at a price that doesn’t really make them money - which a lot of companies do to gain traction. That said, $349 is not a lot for an excellent speaker system, which HomePod is. Well advanced technically from the competing tinny speakers, and cheaper that Google’s premium speaker, it’s main issue is that people compare it to the little tinnies because of its similar look and size. Looking forward to receiving mine next week!
    All they had to do was not lock this thing inside 50 layers of anti-consumer fencing.
    This product is more about solidifying AM subscriptions to try and fend off the bleeding to Spotify, Tidal etc... than it is about the actual product. 

    Remember when they locked up the iPod with all their DRM and iTunes limitations - a year later they had their tails between their legs and had to gradually open the platform up.
    The only reason the first 2 Apple TV's sold was because of XBMC. You couldn't go to a BestBuy or any dealer without them describing the benefits of the product running XBMC - as the product couldn't sell on it's own. 

    Long list of Apple severely limiting their products to maintain their ecosystem. Equally long list of cracks and work-arounds. 
    The Homepod will be no different. Except the user base might be so small that nobody will write a crack - and that only hurts Homepod sales. 

    Even if it sounds fantastic - who wants to be tied to an AM subscription to fully utilize this product. 

    It's not $349 - it's $349 + $10/month. 
    What unadulterated bullshit. Do you have any understanding what your iCloud Music Library is? Hint: in no way do you need an AM subscription to use it. 

    This panic you’re demonstrating is about voice control only. In no way are you prevented from using normal AirPlay to beam whatever you want to it. I prefer apps and AirPlay anyway because I like to visually browse my library and playlists. 


    randominternetpersonlolliverbestkeptsecret
  • Reply 43 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,489member
    bitmod said:
    dachar said:
    I wonder if Apple is about to shake up the hi fi speaker market just like they have done before with other products? What seems to be a potential game changer is incorporating computer hardware and software into a mass market speaker as opposed to super expensive gear. Will there be a whole range of Apple HomePod speakers in 3 years time?
    Show me where Apple uses the term 'HiFi'?
    He never said they do, but it sounds like you're claiming that the HomePod can't be defined as offering any high fidelity when playing back music. If so, can you defend such a weird position?
    lolliver
  • Reply 44 of 76
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 224member
    Soli said:
    bitmod said:
    leighr said:
    Cost is a relative thing. Perhaps Apple would have been better to introduce HomePod at $175 in order to firstly gain market share, and then move up to premium HomePodPro models. They couldn’t drop the quality though, people expect poor quality from Google and Samsung, even Amazon, but poor quality from Apple would not be tolerated, so it would have to be the same model, but at a price that doesn’t really make them money - which a lot of companies do to gain traction. That said, $349 is not a lot for an excellent speaker system, which HomePod is. Well advanced technically from the competing tinny speakers, and cheaper that Google’s premium speaker, it’s main issue is that people compare it to the little tinnies because of its similar look and size. Looking forward to receiving mine next week!
    All they had to do was not lock this thing inside 50 layers of anti-consumer fencing.
    This product is more about solidifying AM subscriptions to try and fend off the bleeding to Spotify, Tidal etc... than it is about the actual product.
    Do you remember when people freaked out because the iPhone didn't ship with a 3rd-party App Store?

    Remember when they locked up the iPod with all their DRM and iTunes limitations - a year later they had their tails between their legs and had to gradually open the platform up.
    1) No. The iPod came out 2 years before the iTunes Music store launched and you could also install AAC, MP3, and ALAC (and possibly other codecs) without any DRM, since it would be impossible to have any DRM on a product where the music will come from ripping CDs.

    2) Jobs was a big advocate for getting rid of DRM because it didn't work. It was the content owners that wanted and Apple was the key reason it went away when it did.

    The only reason the first 2 Apple TV's sold was because of XBMC. You couldn't go to a BestBuy or any dealer without them describing the benefits of the product running XBMC - as the product couldn't sell on it's own. 
    No it's not. Jailbreaking was the key reason older Apple TVs held their value even after newer models were released, but the XMBC numbers don't equate to Apple TV sales.

    Long list of Apple severely limiting their products to maintain their ecosystem. Equally long list of cracks and work-arounds. 
    The Homepod will be no different. Except the user base might be so small that nobody will write a crack - and that only hurts Homepod sales. 
    Then the product should fail just like all their other "ecosystem maintaining" products, like the iPhone with its Lightning port and App Store. :eyeroll:
    1. You made my point about the DRM. When the 'Store' came out - they locked up the iPod. Authorizing computers, removing the HDD options etc...

    2. Jobs hated DRM because it was a barrier to iPod sales and gave control to the music industry. He loved 'DRM' when it gave Apple control in their locked-down ecosystem. 

    3. You know damn well Apple TV was doa without XMBC. Don't even pretend to argue otherwise. Apple didn't - when they shrugged and said 'uuuh... it's just a hobby'. 

    I'm not saying this product is going to fail - because I don't know what metics would even quantify that. But it isn't going to revolutionize the world as we know it.

    What I can say is that; I'm not interested. None of my peers are either. 
    - Never buy revision 1 anything from Apple in post Jobs era. 
    - Privacy Issues
    - Connectivity and functionality issues
    - Requires subscription to use. 

    Will it sound good? For it's purpose - probably. Lots of speaker companies are doing amazing things with beam-forming and small speaker arrays.
    Is it a good price? Probably. 
    Will it find a market? Probably.
    Would it sell considerably more if Apple didn't lock-down the shit out of it? Definitely. 
    Will it bring a 700 billion industry to it's knees and have audiophiles throwing out their $30k systems - only in the minds of the usual Applinsider suspects. 

  • Reply 45 of 76
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 224member
    What unadulterated bullshit. Do you have any understanding what your iCloud Music Library is? Hint: in no way do you need an AM subscription to use it. 

    This panic you’re demonstrating is about voice control only. In no way are you prevented from using normal AirPlay to beam whatever you want to it. I prefer apps and AirPlay anyway because I like to visually browse my library and playlists. 


    No... no understanding of what my iCloud Music Library is. I don't use iCloud. Don't use iTunes either. (and I'm a %100 Apple computing product business and house).

    What you fail to understand is - why would I buy a smart speaker with voice control - that doesn't do voice control or is smart enough to work with my other music subscriptions or even my own cd ripped library (even if I used iTunes)? 

    You have to have an AM subscription to get any benefit out of the 'smart' in the 'smart speaker'. 
    The ENTIRE point of this product is that it's a smart speaker. And it ONLY WORKS if you have an AM subscription. 

    Take a look in the bowl at your own 'unadulterated bullshit' man. 


  • Reply 46 of 76
    jblongzjblongz Posts: 146member
    If you work for Apple and will NOT buy a HomePod, PM me!
  • Reply 47 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,489member
    bitmod said:
    Soli said:
    bitmod said:
    leighr said:
    Cost is a relative thing. Perhaps Apple would have been better to introduce HomePod at $175 in order to firstly gain market share, and then move up to premium HomePodPro models. They couldn’t drop the quality though, people expect poor quality from Google and Samsung, even Amazon, but poor quality from Apple would not be tolerated, so it would have to be the same model, but at a price that doesn’t really make them money - which a lot of companies do to gain traction. That said, $349 is not a lot for an excellent speaker system, which HomePod is. Well advanced technically from the competing tinny speakers, and cheaper that Google’s premium speaker, it’s main issue is that people compare it to the little tinnies because of its similar look and size. Looking forward to receiving mine next week!
    All they had to do was not lock this thing inside 50 layers of anti-consumer fencing.
    This product is more about solidifying AM subscriptions to try and fend off the bleeding to Spotify, Tidal etc... than it is about the actual product.
    Do you remember when people freaked out because the iPhone didn't ship with a 3rd-party App Store?

    Remember when they locked up the iPod with all their DRM and iTunes limitations - a year later they had their tails between their legs and had to gradually open the platform up.
    1) No. The iPod came out 2 years before the iTunes Music store launched and you could also install AAC, MP3, and ALAC (and possibly other codecs) without any DRM, since it would be impossible to have any DRM on a product where the music will come from ripping CDs.

    2) Jobs was a big advocate for getting rid of DRM because it didn't work. It was the content owners that wanted and Apple was the key reason it went away when it did.

    The only reason the first 2 Apple TV's sold was because of XBMC. You couldn't go to a BestBuy or any dealer without them describing the benefits of the product running XBMC - as the product couldn't sell on it's own. 
    No it's not. Jailbreaking was the key reason older Apple TVs held their value even after newer models were released, but the XMBC numbers don't equate to Apple TV sales.

    Long list of Apple severely limiting their products to maintain their ecosystem. Equally long list of cracks and work-arounds. 
    The Homepod will be no different. Except the user base might be so small that nobody will write a crack - and that only hurts Homepod sales. 
    Then the product should fail just like all their other "ecosystem maintaining" products, like the iPhone with its Lightning port and App Store. :eyeroll:
    1. You made my point about the DRM. When the 'Store' came out - they locked up the iPod. Authorizing computers, removing the HDD options etc...

    2. Jobs hated DRM because it was a barrier to iPod sales and gave control to the music industry. He loved 'DRM' when it gave Apple control in their locked-down ecosystem. 

    3. You know damn well Apple TV was doa without XMBC. Don't even pretend to argue otherwise. Apple didn't - when they shrugged and said 'uuuh... it's just a hobby'. 

    I'm not saying this product is going to fail - because I don't know what metics would even quantify that. But it isn't going to revolutionize the world as we know it.

    What I can say is that; I'm not interested. None of my peers are either. 
    - Never buy revision 1 anything from Apple in post Jobs era. 
    - Privacy Issues
    - Connectivity and functionality issues
    - Requires subscription to use. 

    Will it sound good? For it's purpose - probably. Lots of speaker companies are doing amazing things with beam-forming and small speaker arrays.
    Is it a good price? Probably. 
    Will it find a market? Probably.
    Would it sell considerably more if Apple didn't lock-down the shit out of it? Definitely. 
    Will it bring a 700 billion industry to it's knees and have audiophiles throwing out their $30k systems - only in the minds of the usual Applinsider suspects. 

    Damn that's a lot of lying for one post so I'll only address one point (the first). I didn't "make your point," you had to change your point when you were caught in a blatantly lie that iPod could only use DRM-ed content from the iTunes Music Store despite the iPod coming out 2 calendar years before the Store. It's also a lie that Apple did any "lock up" to remove codecs and access to content that wasn't from their Store.
    StrangeDayslolliverbestkeptsecret
  • Reply 48 of 76
    bitmod said:
    Show me where Apple uses the term 'HiFi'?

    jfanninglolliver
  • Reply 49 of 76
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,069member
    SendMcjak said:
    Selling like hot-cakes!
    Just like the Watch. What a dismal failure that turned out to be.
    lolliver
  • Reply 50 of 76
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,069member
    Yep, girlfriend just told me about this and now we’ll be getting one at the half off price. Have absolutely no use for it as I have a way better HT system setup, but might as well try it for a bit. 
    Clearly it would seem your girlfriend is smarter than you. You may indeed have no use for it but you also don't understand that the HomePod is not about replacing a 'way better [LMAO] HT system setup'.

    Hopefully your girlfriend will get an upgraded boyfriend along with the HomePod.
    matrix077lolliver
  • Reply 51 of 76
    bitmod said:
    What unadulterated bullshit. Do you have any understanding what your iCloud Music Library is? Hint: in no way do you need an AM subscription to use it. 

    This panic you’re demonstrating is about voice control only. In no way are you prevented from using normal AirPlay to beam whatever you want to it. I prefer apps and AirPlay anyway because I like to visually browse my library and playlists. 


    No... no understanding of what my iCloud Music Library is. I don't use iCloud. Don't use iTunes either. (and I'm a %100 Apple computing product business and house).

    What you fail to understand is - why would I buy a smart speaker with voice control - that doesn't do voice control or is smart enough to work with my other music subscriptions or even my own cd ripped library (even if I used iTunes)? 

    You have to have an AM subscription to get any benefit out of the 'smart' in the 'smart speaker'. 
    The ENTIRE point of this product is that it's a smart speaker. And it ONLY WORKS if you have an AM subscription. 

    Take a look in the bowl at your own 'unadulterated bullshit' man. 
    Here’s why you’re bullshit - you have absolutely no idea what on earth you’re even trying to talk about. 

    Even to to use voice control, you don’t need to subscribe to Apple Music. You’re just making shit up because you’re too lazy to find out how it works. Hint: you’re wrong. again. 

    Go peddle your ignorant bullshit elsewhere. 
    lollivermacgui
  • Reply 52 of 76
    mike54mike54 Posts: 294member
    I think HomePod working within the Apple only eco-system is ok for now, if only the eco-system isn't a confusing mess of what you can or cannot do with it, so much so that it takes dozens of articles to explain it.
    edited February 2018
  • Reply 53 of 76
    While many of the comments regarding HomePod are entertaining, it will be interesting to read reviews and comments from actual HomePod users.  Looking forward to it.
  • Reply 54 of 76
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,901member
    macxpress said:
    MacPro said:
    supadav03 said:
    Guess i’ll be hitting up my friend who works at the Apple Store at the Galleria Mall to score one of these for me at half price ߘ즬t;br>
    I wonder if the employees have to sign some sort of agreement to prevent exactly what you suggest from happening.
    How is Apple going to know that you bought a HomePod and gave it to someone else? After you purchase it, Apple is in no position to tell you what you can and cannot do with something. 
    I agree, sorry if I wasn't clear, yes giving is one thing but I was thinking about reselling restrictions.
    edited February 2018
  • Reply 55 of 76
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,901member

    bitmod said:
    MacPro said:
    Yep, girlfriend just told me about this and now we’ll be getting one at the half off price. Have absolutely no use for it as I have a way better HT system setup, but might as well try it for a bit. 
    I may be wrong but I suspect over time Apple's use of advanced computer technology and beam forming will make all audio HiFi enthusiasts rethink what they consider the bees knees.  I am not saying HomePods are going to compete with the audio on a high end system but I am saying more and more high end systems will start to incorporate the same technology and one day we will look back to when Apple changed the face of HiFi. 
    Dude... seriously. 
    There are hundreds of other companies already using this technology - and have been for over a decade. 
    Apple is just combining that tech with a voice assistant. They aren't changing the face of anything. They aren't pioneering anything. 
    They are simply packaging several technologies together - with their own design. 

    It's like you are saying Apple invented the camera because they put it on an iPhone. 
    They adapted camera technology that was already there - into the iPhone. 
    This is no different - Apple didn't invent beam-forming, and the HomePod is not HiFi.
    Show me where Apple uses the term HiFi?
    They don't. 

    I think you explained my point exactly, thank you dude.  Like Phones were around before iPhone.  It isn't until Apple rethink a technology that it takes off in a new direction and to new levels of acceptance.  Those hundreds of beam forming products you mention are not exactly well known by Joe public, witness how many are looking up the terminology.  Apple didn't use HiFi, I did.  I said HiFi manufacturers and HiFi products may change in the future because of Apple, the same way so many other products in the past have been rethought post an Apple entry into that already established market.  
    edited February 2018 randominternetperson
  • Reply 56 of 76
    supadav03 said:
    Guess i’ll be hitting up my friend who works at the Apple Store at the Galleria Mall to score one of these for me at half price 😬
    Yeah good luck with that.  Unless you're his only friend or relative and a really good one at that.
  • Reply 57 of 76

    zoetmb said:
    Mmm...

    IDK the current state of audio amplifiers, speakers, etc.

    In 1950 our family (I was 10 years old) moved from Minneapolis to Pasadena -- my dad and uncle created a company that made HiFi radios. They sounded pretty good!

    I especially remember  a (circa 1951 or 1952) maple, wall-mounted model that looked like  a knick-knack shelf (about 3' wide, 3' high and 1' deep).  It had some feature they called bass-crossover, and it filled the room with sound.

    Sadly, the company failed and my dad had to get a regular job.  

    But, audio was in his blood -- and he kept making hifi, then stereo systems as a hobby.  He would cobble together inexpensive instruments and parts from the war surplus store... He even built a table saw from an old motor so he could build speaker/amplifier/turntable cabinets.

    Long story -- even longer...

    I can remember him testing his radios using a Cathode Ray Ocilloscope -- I couldn't hear it, my dad couldn't hear it -- but my mom, in another room complained (and neighbor's dogs barked).

    He would experiment, build a system -- then sell it for a profit... rinse and repeat.

    Later, when I was out on my own, I'd stop by the Pasadena homestead and he would proudly show off his latest creation... new amplifier, crate-size folded-horn speakers, whatever.

    The crowing glory, tho, was a system he built that made the made the bay window on the opposite side of the living room vibrate...  he could make a wooden Japanese candy dish  jump off their marble coffee table. 

    I guess you could say that sound is meant to be felt as well as heard!

    I think audio today is a mixed bag.  On the one hand, when I listen to old tracks, transferred from CD to my iPhone uncompressed with decent quality Grado ear buds, the sound is pretty damned good and how I remember it.   I have a high-end consumer A/V receiver (high-end, but not at the esoteric level) and it sounds great for Blu-ray movies, but it's absolutely terrible for analog audio and for listening to CD's.   I had to reinstall a 1970's preamp and power amp and install an amp switch to the speakers so I could switch between the A/V receiver and the old hi-fi.   I think the problem is a combination of digital processing (even when it's supposedly toggled off) and inferior solid state electronics, even at the high end.

    I've gone to esoteric hi-fi shows expecting to hear miraculous sound from the extraordinarily expensive systems ($5-$10,000 turntables, $20,000 speaker systems, $10,000 amps, even the cables cost $1000+) and I'm almost always disappointed and feel like if I spent even $2K on such a system, I'd be ripped off.  They mostly sound incredibly dull and lack anything resembling definition.     

    What's hard to know is whether old systems of the 1960's-1970's really sounded good or whether we just remember them that way.   In the 60's, I had a Fisher receiver and AR speakers and I remember it sounding spectacular.   There were speakers from AR, Advent and other companies in which Henry Kloss had a role in the design and they all had a very refined sound that you don't hear today.   (Kloss also designed the Tivoli radios, which sound pretty good for a small box.)   I sold audio at the Korvettes chain in the early 70's and even the house brand speakers, which were actually manufactured by Electro Voice, sounded pretty good.   

    I'm open to hearing what Apple has accomplished, but I have my doubts.   For background listening, I'm sure it's fine.   My brother has the Sonos and that sounds fine for background listening.   But for foreground serious listening, maybe not.    As others have posted, I question getting decent stereo out of one small box (how is it that so many people don't care about stereo anymore - although maybe it's because everyone is background listening) and you can't get past the physics that in order to reproduce decent sound, you have to push air and especially for low frequencies with long wavelengths, you have to push a lot of air, which a small speaker simply can't do.   
    If you're like a normal human, your hearing 30 or 40 years ago was such much better that it is today that probably everything sounded better.  I have to laugh when senior citizen rock icon rave about better-than-CD quality audio or complain about digital music in general.  I would bet real money on the proposition that 99% of them have degraded hearing and could never pick out a difference in a properly A-B test.
    lolliverdick applebaum
  • Reply 58 of 76
    bitmod said:
    MacPro said:
    Yep, girlfriend just told me about this and now we’ll be getting one at the half off price. Have absolutely no use for it as I have a way better HT system setup, but might as well try it for a bit. 
    I may be wrong but I suspect over time Apple's use of advanced computer technology and beam forming will make all audio HiFi enthusiasts rethink what they consider the bees knees.  I am not saying HomePods are going to compete with the audio on a high end system but I am saying more and more high end systems will start to incorporate the same technology and one day we will look back to when Apple changed the face of HiFi. 
    Dude... seriously. 
    There are hundreds of other companies already using this technology - and have been for over a decade. 
    Apple is just combining that tech with a voice assistant. They aren't changing the face of anything. They aren't pioneering anything. 
    They are simply packaging several technologies together - with their own design. 

    It's like you are saying Apple invented the camera because they put it on an iPhone. 
    They adapted camera technology that was already there - into the iPhone. 
    This is no different - Apple didn't invent beam-forming, and the HomePod is not HiFi.
    Show me where Apple uses the term HiFi?
    They don't. 

    LOL.  "They are simply packaging several technologies together - with their own design."  That's pretty much the definition of product development.  Telsa just packaged several technologies together with their own design.  The creator of the Segway just packaged several technologies together with their own design.  Etc. etc. etc.

    Thanks for the laugh.  By the way, Read up on Music Match.  I don't think you understand how it works and how it's distinct from Apple Music. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204146
    lolliver
  • Reply 59 of 76
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,730member
    Soli said:
    macxpress said:
    Soli said:
    macxpress said:
    MacPro said:
    supadav03 said:
    Guess i’ll be hitting up my friend who works at the Apple Store at the Galleria Mall to score one of these for me at half price ߘ즬t;br>
    I wonder if the employees have to sign some sort of agreement to prevent exactly what you suggest from happening.
    How is Apple going to know that you bought a HomePod and gave it to someone else? After you purchase it, Apple is in no position to tell you what you can and cannot do with something. 
    I can't imagine how Apple wouldn't be able to see analytics for an internet connected device whose primary source of streaming music is from an Apple Music account.
    Then how is Apple going to know it was this very HomePod that was sold and now being used by someone else? Why would Apple really care anyways? Its getting the device in the hands of more people. Hell, maybe this person would decide to buy another at full price. 
    1) You're asking how would a company have an idea how a device with a digital serial number and MAC addresses for the various network connection types, various network account services, and IP address data can be used to track a device and its usage? I don't even know where to begin with something that I thought was common knowledge. Even with this forum it's very easy for AI's staff to figure out where you're posting from and if you're using aliases if you're using the same network to post.

    2) Apple cares about analytics because they want to see patterns in how their devices are used, but that data is purposely anonymized because it's the aggregate that is important, not the outliers. Why they would care about a particular employee is selling a HomePod to make a profit doesn't blip my radar, and I doubt it would Apple's, unless there's been a problem with this in the past. My guess is that most employees enjoy using Apple products and getting these in the hands of employees helps sales.
    You're totally missing the point of my post. Why would Apple care if a retail store employee bought a HomePod for someone else and gave it to them? I know obviously Apple can track all of this shit and why they do it, but why would Apple care if someone got one at half price from an employee? 
  • Reply 60 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,489member
    macxpress said:
    Soli said:
    macxpress said:
    Soli said:
    macxpress said:
    MacPro said:
    supadav03 said:
    Guess i’ll be hitting up my friend who works at the Apple Store at the Galleria Mall to score one of these for me at half price ߘ즬t;br>
    I wonder if the employees have to sign some sort of agreement to prevent exactly what you suggest from happening.
    How is Apple going to know that you bought a HomePod and gave it to someone else? After you purchase it, Apple is in no position to tell you what you can and cannot do with something. 
    I can't imagine how Apple wouldn't be able to see analytics for an internet connected device whose primary source of streaming music is from an Apple Music account.
    Then how is Apple going to know it was this very HomePod that was sold and now being used by someone else? Why would Apple really care anyways? Its getting the device in the hands of more people. Hell, maybe this person would decide to buy another at full price. 
    1) You're asking how would a company have an idea how a device with a digital serial number and MAC addresses for the various network connection types, various network account services, and IP address data can be used to track a device and its usage? I don't even know where to begin with something that I thought was common knowledge. Even with this forum it's very easy for AI's staff to figure out where you're posting from and if you're using aliases if you're using the same network to post.

    2) Apple cares about analytics because they want to see patterns in how their devices are used, but that data is purposely anonymized because it's the aggregate that is important, not the outliers. Why they would care about a particular employee is selling a HomePod to make a profit doesn't blip my radar, and I doubt it would Apple's, unless there's been a problem with this in the past. My guess is that most employees enjoy using Apple products and getting these in the hands of employees helps sales.
    You're totally missing the point of my post. Why would Apple care if a retail store employee bought a HomePod for someone else and gave it to them? I know obviously Apple can track all of this shit and why they do it, but why would Apple care if someone got one at half price from an employee? 
    Why would Apple care if someone got one at half price from an employee?" is not the same query as "how is Apple going to know?" I answered both just to be sure.
    lollivermuthuk_vanalingam
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