First look: iPhone Battery Health settings in iOS 11.3

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 42
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,019member
    The battery health information is helpful to me. The current presentation could probably be simplified a bit for general consumption. It’s good to know that my 3+ year old battery is at 97% capacity with no peak reductions but it would be even nicer to see numerical ranges, perhaps with green-yellow-red shading to let people know when they should consider getting a battery replacement to prevent potential issues. Pushing notifications when thresholds are crossed would also be nice.  But overall, it’s a nice first step and welcome diagnostic. 
  • Reply 22 of 42
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,940member
    mike54 said:
    I hope this works as its meant to, and the measurements are accurate as possible.
    (Just a reminder, the original motive for the secretive throttling was to cover up faulty/defective batteries which should of been replaced under warranty/recall. The ageing battery excuse was for the plebs.)
    Scurrilous, libelous, unsupported nonsense from a filthy troll. If Apple were to sue you for defamation could you prove your dumbass assertion?
    jony0
  • Reply 23 of 42
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,940member
    This whole thing is a techie wannabe cluster f***. Who in their right mind would turn off the protection feature and take the chance that their phone would suddenly shut down in the middle of, oh I don’t know, a 911 emergency call? That’s a choice the user should NOT have. Battery performance data for the neckbeard crowd to stew over, okay. But allowing the user to place their very life in danger because of sudden shutdown? No.
    jony0
  • Reply 24 of 42
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,178member
    radarthekat said:
    Never take seriously people who write ‘should of.’
    True dat, but also often applies to posts that start with or otherwise contain 'this should have been...' from authors who feel compelled to demonstrate their 20/20 hindsight acuity, as though it's some measure of general intelligence.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 25 of 42
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,178member
    I wish coconutBattery ran natively in iOS. Unless something's changed very recently, I have to run it on my Macs and connect my phone to read the cycle count.

    Since doing that, I've dumped all of the iOS 'Battery' apps as none I've tried give that information. None seem to actually take actual battery capacity into account. My battery in one phone is in bad shape and I have to get to replacing it. These 'battery' apps all say I have much longer run times then reality supports.
  • Reply 26 of 42
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,019member
    lkrupp said:
    This whole thing is a techie wannabe cluster f***. Who in their right mind would turn off the protection feature and take the chance that their phone would suddenly shut down in the middle of, oh I don’t know, a 911 emergency call? That’s a choice the user should NOT have. Battery performance data for the neckbeard crowd to stew over, okay. But allowing the user to place their very life in danger because of sudden shutdown? No.
    Yup. It's kind of like the electric utility sending everyone with a conventional electric fuse box a free penny, just in case... 
    jony0
  • Reply 27 of 42
    lkrupp said:
    mike54 said:
    I hope this works as its meant to, and the measurements are accurate as possible.
    (Just a reminder, the original motive for the secretive throttling was to cover up faulty/defective batteries which should of been replaced under warranty/recall. The ageing battery excuse was for the plebs.)
    Scurrilous, libelous, unsupported nonsense from a filthy troll. If Apple were to sue you for defamation could you prove your dumbass assertion?
    Wow, what a response. Hidden agenda perhaps? How much Apple stock do you own?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 28 of 42
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 29 of 42
    StrangeDays said:
    before the need for them becomes apparent. 
    CoconutBattery has existed since before iPhone OS allowed third party apps in the first place. The user being able to check battery lifespan NATIVELY could save thousands of wasted hours at genius bars while the Apple techs look over something that every user should have already had access to.
    Says you now. For the first many years of a decade of iPhone, nobody really cared. Apple correctly prioritized other value adds before getting here now. Software/product/design is compromise. Everything doesn't come at once. iPhone 1 and iPhone OS couldn't even record video, send MMS, or even do copy & paste. Priorities.
  • Reply 30 of 42
    atomic101 said:
    lkrupp said:
    mike54 said:
    I hope this works as its meant to, and the measurements are accurate as possible.
    (Just a reminder, the original motive for the secretive throttling was to cover up faulty/defective batteries which should of been replaced under warranty/recall. The ageing battery excuse was for the plebs.)
    Scurrilous, libelous, unsupported nonsense from a filthy troll. If Apple were to sue you for defamation could you prove your dumbass assertion?
    Wow, what a response. Hidden agenda perhaps? How much Apple stock do you own?
    Doubt he has any, we're just used to seeing the rantings of hair-brained trolls. 

    Not to say you're a troll, but you went on & on about how your SE was "just fine" before iOS 11 "but now its being throttled!" -- not even realizing the feature was implemented in 10.2.1. So your entire rant was nonsense. Sorry, but things that seem clear to non-engineers who don't know anything about the product or software engineering just tend to never be so clear IRL. It's the nature of complex systems. I do this for a living on much less complex systems and even they are never simple.
  • Reply 31 of 42

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    jony0
  • Reply 32 of 42
    atomic101 said:
    lkrupp said:
    mike54 said:
    I hope this works as its meant to, and the measurements are accurate as possible.
    (Just a reminder, the original motive for the secretive throttling was to cover up faulty/defective batteries which should of been replaced under warranty/recall. The ageing battery excuse was for the plebs.)
    Scurrilous, libelous, unsupported nonsense from a filthy troll. If Apple were to sue you for defamation could you prove your dumbass assertion?
    Wow, what a response. Hidden agenda perhaps? How much Apple stock do you own?
    Doubt he has any, we're just used to seeing the rantings of hair-brained trolls. 

    Not to say you're a troll, but you went on & on about how your SE was "just fine" before iOS 11 "but now its being throttled!" -- not even realizing the feature was implemented in 10.2.1. So your entire rant was nonsense. Sorry, but things that seem clear to non-engineers who don't know anything about the product or software engineering just tend to never be so clear IRL. It's the nature of complex systems. I do this for a living on much less complex systems and even they are never simple.
    Such close-mindedness in these forums.  Yes, my "entire rant was nonsense"... even though it was a battery issue the entire time, Apple said that they fully implemented their feature for all models with 10.2.1, so to heck with your observations, right?  Apple spoke and that is the gods honest truth... no debate allowed!

    You know what? What if it was implemented in 10.2.1? Does that somehow make it any better?  With the new battery, my phone performance is fantastic.  The benchmarks and app utilities support my observations (search for one of my previous posts for before and after screenshots). So much so that it feels like a new phone. I don’t remember the exact date that my phone stopped running like it first did, but I do remember my utter disappointment at how laggy iOS 11 felt on initial updating. 

    Why get hung up on minute details for the sake of winning one over on the other person when the meat of the discussion is still sitting there looking you in the face??? That is, Apple degraded performance of people’s phones without even a hint of a warning, leaving most people to assume it was just the slow pace of technology becoming obsolete.  If my battery was bad enough to fit the criteria of 50% throttling (see my other posts), why couldn’t I even get the courtesy of a notification of this occurrence?  On top of that, why was the battery still “good” and unfit for replacement when I brought it to Apple before the PR campaign hit the streets?  Explain that to me, or at least entertain a collegial conversation about it before calling my discussion all "nonsense”. 
    feudalistmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 33 of 42

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    Haha. My 12m old 7 has 93% remaining capacity and yesterday shutted down when my wife called me. Battery was at 50-60% charge. Intensely? You are just ignoring facts. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 34 of 42
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,748member
    feudalist said:

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    Haha. My 12m old 7 has 93% remaining capacity and yesterday shutted down when my wife called me. Battery was at 50-60% charge. Intensely? You are just ignoring facts. 
    I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Are you saying that it shutdown because of a battery issue? If you are, why not consider that there was a fatal OS issue that crashed the device? If it was the battery, then doesn't this make a case for Apple's to throttle the CPU slightly make sure there is no power spike on a used battery not at full charge? If you think your battery is a problem and you're right at the warranty (or halfway through it) why not let Apple inspect it since they can see exactly why the device crashed?
  • Reply 35 of 42
    Soli said:
    feudalist said:

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    Haha. My 12m old 7 has 93% remaining capacity and yesterday shutted down when my wife called me. Battery was at 50-60% charge. Intensely? You are just ignoring facts. 
    I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Are you saying that it shutdown because of a battery issue? If you are, why not consider that there was a fatal OS issue that crashed the device? If it was the battery, then doesn't this make a case for Apple's to throttle the CPU slightly make sure there is no power spike on a used battery not at full charge? If you think your battery is a problem and you're right at the warranty (or halfway through it) why not let Apple inspect it since they can see exactly why the device crashed?
    It was battery because I had to connect charger to be able to power it again. Beside, whatever cause may be, It’s apple, it’s 800 USD, it’s basic functionality and I can’t depend on it. Of course, service is sheduled, but hey, one year old iphone can not handle plain old voice call????? I’m truly dissapointed and pissed off
  • Reply 36 of 42
    feudalist said:
    Soli said:
    feudalist said:

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    Haha. My 12m old 7 has 93% remaining capacity and yesterday shutted down when my wife called me. Battery was at 50-60% charge. Intensely? You are just ignoring facts. 
    I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Are you saying that it shutdown because of a battery issue? If you are, why not consider that there was a fatal OS issue that crashed the device? If it was the battery, then doesn't this make a case for Apple's to throttle the CPU slightly make sure there is no power spike on a used battery not at full charge? If you think your battery is a problem and you're right at the warranty (or halfway through it) why not let Apple inspect it since they can see exactly why the device crashed?
    It was battery because I had to connect charger to be able to power it again. Beside, whatever cause may be, It’s apple, it’s 800 USD, it’s basic functionality and I can’t depend on it. Of course, service is sheduled, but hey, one year old iphone can not handle plain old voice call????? I’m truly dissapointed and pissed off
    You could be pissed off, or you could just assume there's most likely a problem with your battery and it needs to be serviced, make a Genius Bar appointment and take it in, and with any luck get the battery or entire device swapped out on the spot and be done with it. I took my 6 in *just* out of warranty because there was a gasket or something very slightly starting to slide in front of the FaceTime camera lens, and they gave me a new/refurb 6 without blinking. There's no need to get angry over it.


    Soli
  • Reply 37 of 42
    feudalist said:
    Soli said:
    feudalist said:

    feudalist said:
    foggyhill said:
    adm1 said:
    this is all very well and good, but still misses the point of why this only became a "thing" from the iPhone 6 onwards. Why did iPhone 3/3G/4/4S/5/5S batteries last for several years without problems? iPhone 6 onward only seem to last 1-2years before suffering battery related issues? Are the phones now too powerful for lithium-ion tech to keep up with? 
    Because those SOC needed less peak performance than the latest ones, a bigger battery alone does not solve this.

    Having higher peak performance also means more heat and that also has an impact on batteries.

    Apple has sort of mitigated this by in fact overhauling power management apparatus of the Iphone 8 and X (which is in fact again... "throttling" and babbying the batteries, that's what power management is doing except it will now be doing straight from the start and will thus be baked into the initial performance of the device) AND in creating smaller cores to handle tasks that don't require immediate response (so limiting the draw on the battery)

    Other companies like Samsung started to be hit a bit later (after the Iphone 6) cause their SOC were not as powerful and they were using multi-core already. But, in the last two years in has emerged there too and unless they put some work they'll have shutdowns all over the place.

    And yes, the problem is the battery technology has not kept up with how powerful those pocket computers are.

    They'd need some tech that is more resilient to high loads and heat and not just more energy dense, though that would help too.

    Another issue is USAGE of those powerful devices have changed, people in the 3GS days did a lot less thing on their phones than now, there were less Apps (the app store was pretty new) and the apps that existed had less capability. Most people didn't keep their GPS on all the time, which is the case now. Apple had strong limitations on background apps that don't exist now.  Video usage on phones was lower, music streaming was emergent, few used it..

    Interconnection opportunities have exploded through blue tooth (headphones, Apple Watch, Speakers, beacons, home automation)  or WIFI (airplay, homekit, etc, AppleTV).

    Finally, because those devices are so damn powerful, people don't feel a need to upgrade as quickly than before, so the heaviest users (charging say twice a day) that WOULD have been hit by these things before but had already moved on to a new phone by then, now are keeping their phones.

    Those heavy users are using their phones even more heavily.and intensely on phones that have gotten much more powerful and want to keep those phones longer, it's obvious a hell of a lot of people will have depleted batteries after 12-18 months than before because battery tech has barely moved.

    For many people, that are not heavy, intense users, the phones will still last 24-36 months before requiring a battery change. In the old days, most people would have changed their phones by year 3. But, now those "normal" users are keeping their phones and thus they will be hit before they buy their next phone, somewhere in year 3-4.

    It's like people got used to not changing their batteries because of the fast upgrade cycles (the people that got their phones undoubtedly knew they needed to change that battery and there were battery change shops everywhere to do it).

    As for pre 6 not running into this, I did run into this, but a bit later, usually if you kept your phone more than 3 years on those less powerful phones. I had to change my 3GS battery at year 4 cause it was always dying, especially if it was even slightly cold outside.

    This is not about battery tech per se or changed user habits but about wrong compromise apple maked. 

    Battery response curve to instantenous power draw is regulated by amount of electrolyte. Yes, it’s that simple. But, higher amount in given volume will result in lower capacity and you know the rest. 

    And this talk about ageing and consumable angle is just PR BS to avoid costly recall. Read this: https://www.macworld.com/article/1058916/smartphones/iphonebattery.html

    read it as: don’t wory, non replaceable battery is just fine. Now is not so, ur expected to change because battery IS consumable item. Which way is, dear Apple?
    What a load of nonsense. 

    Yes, rechargeable batteries are, and have always been, consumable. Even old iPods had battery replacement services. You just didnt care back then because you didnt use the devices as intensely as we use them today. EOS.

    Next!
    Haha. My 12m old 7 has 93% remaining capacity and yesterday shutted down when my wife called me. Battery was at 50-60% charge. Intensely? You are just ignoring facts. 
    I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Are you saying that it shutdown because of a battery issue? If you are, why not consider that there was a fatal OS issue that crashed the device? If it was the battery, then doesn't this make a case for Apple's to throttle the CPU slightly make sure there is no power spike on a used battery not at full charge? If you think your battery is a problem and you're right at the warranty (or halfway through it) why not let Apple inspect it since they can see exactly why the device crashed?
    It was battery because I had to connect charger to be able to power it again. Beside, whatever cause may be, It’s apple, it’s 800 USD, it’s basic functionality and I can’t depend on it. Of course, service is sheduled, but hey, one year old iphone can not handle plain old voice call????? I’m truly dissapointed and pissed off
    You could be pissed off, or you could just assume there's most likely a problem with your battery and it needs to be serviced, make a Genius Bar appointment and take it in, and with any luck get the battery or entire device swapped out on the spot and be done with it. I took my 6 in *just* out of warranty because there was a gasket or something very slightly starting to slide in front of the FaceTime camera lens, and they gave me a new/refurb 6 without blinking. There's no need to get angry over it.


    Yes, warranty is two weeks over so it's on me. #%"%&"
  • Reply 38 of 42
    tipoo said:
    I'm going to be very interested to see what this looks like on mine. 

    My iPhone 7 is under a year old, even with a full cycle a day it should be far from the 500 they rate them at before hitting 80% capacity, but it drops frames everywhere around the UI and is rather frustrating that way. I can't tell yet what's iOS11 and what's the battery. 

    I as well.  I'm having some issues switching away from the phone app when some other apps are running.  Not sure what's causing it yet (I don't think it's the battery, because I don't notice it anywhere except the phone app), but this new functionality should serve to eliminate that definitively.
  • Reply 39 of 42
    I'm worrying Apple opens up a can of worms here. People would expect 100% battery and if theirs is not, they will complain. This is blown out of proportion. Of course people think this is an Apple only problem and that Apple only batteries have these problems. This is all not good :-( Sometimes knowing less is better.
  • Reply 40 of 42
    I wish I could automatically throttle my 3 y/o iPad Air 2 now. It's been crashing (shutting down) several times a week the past few weeks. I downloaded an App that shows 45% battery wear level (varies for some reason each time I check it). When I have time I'll have Apple replace the battery. I'll have to try some of the throttling, via settings, that Apple says it will do automatically with iOS 11.3.
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