Phone from 'The Matrix' resurrected in the modernized Nokia 8110 Reloaded

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 25
Continuing a pattern of reviving older designs in an attempt to stay relevant in the mobile phone industry, Nokia has resurrected one of its more famous designs, bringing back the Nokia 8110 as a feature phone with a bigger screen and a sleeker appearance, while still retaining its well-known physical slide-out design.




Best known as the mobile phone acquired by Neo in "The Matrix," the reloaded Nokia 8110 produced by licensee HMD Global modernizes the device, with the most apparent alteration being the inclusion of a larger 2.4-inch 320 by 240-pixel color display. Like the original, the keypad is hidden behind a slide-down panel, which can also be used to unlock and answer the device.

Externally, the only other major change to the design is the addition of a rear 2-megapixel camera with an LED flash, an option not available on the original version. Also on the outside is a headphone jack and a microUSB 2.0 connector, as well as access to remove the 1,500mAh battery.

A dual-core 1.1GHz Qualcomm 205 processor with 512MB of RAM powers the device, running the "Smart Feature OS" powered by KaiOS. Its 4GB of internal storage can be used to store photos, videos, and music, with it able to play back AAC, AMR, MP3, MIDI, and Vorbis file formats, and FM radio broadcasts.




One major upgrade is the device's connectivity, with it able to handle 4G LTE connections as well as 3G, can be added to a Wi-Fi network, can connect to accessories over Bluetooth 4.1, and GPS.

One of the more useful elements of the new Nokia 8110 is its relatively long battery life, as while it can last for over 6 hours playing back video and between 7 hours and 9.3 hours of talk time depending on the connection, it offers up to 48 hours of music playback, and can last on standby for up to 25 days.

Offered in a choice of black or yellow color options, the updated Nokia 8110 will be available in May, priced at 79 euro ($97).

Original Nokia 8110, as seen in 'The Matrix'
Original Nokia 8110, as seen in 'The Matrix'

zroger73
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    $100 for that historic junk.
    If it was $30-50 maybe. But what are they even thinking!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 35
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    Didn't the one in the movie have a spring release for the slider? If so, does this consumer model?

    edit: Yes. No.


    edited February 25 redgeminipa
  • Reply 3 of 35
    The slide out is a bad design.  It means you can’t use it with one hand.

    If I was going to buy a phone with a keyboard, it would have an Android OS, Blackberry keyboard, low cost, and limited functions.

    The problem is my “limited functionality” requirements is calling, texting, and maps.  Maps are too small on a phone with a keyboard.

    In other words this phone is DOA...
    jbdragon
  • Reply 4 of 35
    $100 for that historic junk.
    If it was $30-50 maybe. But what are they even thinking!
    My thoughts exactly.  Why go there?
    People use phones for more than calls.  4GB space is laughable. 10 years too late.
    racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 35
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,630member
    If it ran iOS, I might be interested. And, the flip-phones were much nicer than the slide ones. I can't remember what brand/model I had around 2000 anymore, but I loved that thing in terms of ergonomics of a phone.
    JaiOh81
  • Reply 6 of 35
    BebeBebe Posts: 107member
    Whatever price point this phone will be, it doesn't matter anymore.  Nokia is dead.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 35
    Bebe said:
    Whatever price point this phone will be, it doesn't matter anymore.  Nokia is dead.
    It still has fans in South East Asia.
    And old people like them too.
    Even I used one back in 2006.
  • Reply 8 of 35
    cgWerks said:
    If it ran iOS, I might be interested. And, the flip-phones were much nicer than the slide ones. I can't remember what brand/model I had around 2000 anymore, but I loved that thing in terms of ergonomics of a phone.
    I think it's the Motorola Razr.
    netmagewatto_cobraredgeminipajbdragonshamino
  • Reply 9 of 35
    I don't think the target audience for this phone is the readers here. There are some that can't/don't want to use a smart phone and who would love a feature phone (like we used to have...). The key question for that audience is still likely to be ergonomics though: if that's right then the phone will find a market.
    wonkothesaneStrangeDayspscooter63
  • Reply 10 of 35
    Didn’t they revived old nokia recently?? I think that one flopped too....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 35
    xbitxbit Posts: 216member
    Continuing a pattern of reviving older smartphones
    The original Nokia 8110 wasn't a smartphone. It wasn't even a feature phone. 

    Cool design for the time though. I had one the follow-up phones (the 7110) and I can confirm that the spring-loaded panel was super awesome.
    chianetmagewatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 35
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,257member
    To me it seems fairly obvious this phone isn't going to be promoted for most Western markets. 
  • Reply 13 of 35
    cincymac said:
    cgWerks said:
    If it ran iOS, I might be interested. And, the flip-phones were much nicer than the slide ones. I can't remember what brand/model I had around 2000 anymore, but I loved that thing in terms of ergonomics of a phone.
    I think it's the Motorola Razr.
    The Motorola Razr didn't go on sale until 2004. I had a matte black one until 2007 when I bought my first iPhone. I LOVED MY RAZR. Most of my friends had them. My mom had a pink one and dad had a blue one.

    Such simpler times. :)
    edited February 25 king editor the gratejbdragon
  • Reply 14 of 35
    Every time I'm getting rid of stuff, I pick up Razr, fully intending to wipe it, then instead ogle it, charge it, boot it, power it down, and put it away again. Lousy inanimate object!
    zroger73netmagewatto_cobrajcs2305
  • Reply 15 of 35
    cgWerks said:
    If it ran iOS, I might be interested. And, the flip-phones were much nicer than the slide ones. I can't remember what brand/model I had around 2000 anymore, but I loved that thing in terms of ergonomics of a phone.
    Motorola V60? That and the startac were my favorite phones before my crackberry 
    netmagecgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 35
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,257member
    JaiOh81 said:
    cgWerks said:
    If it ran iOS, I might be interested. And, the flip-phones were much nicer than the slide ones. I can't remember what brand/model I had around 2000 anymore, but I loved that thing in terms of ergonomics of a phone.
    Motorola V60? That and the startac were my favorite phones before my crackberry 
    +1 on the StarTac
    cgWerks
  • Reply 17 of 35
    " ...reviving older designs in an attempt to stay relevant..."

    Shurely shome mishtake

    No phone was ever more astounding upon release than the minuscule 8210
    edited February 25 watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 35
    *** 2 *** Megapixel Camera. Next....
    watto_cobraravnorodomjbdragon
  • Reply 19 of 35
    Which analysts, bloggers will try to be the first to proclaim this retro phone is a clear indication of how Nokia is innovating faster, better than Apple? 😉
    racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 35
    The slide out is a bad design.  It means you can’t use it with one hand.
    You could in The Matrix, because they added a spring loaded function to it, which Nokia added to its successor, the 7110.

    In fact, that's what made it cool.

    Sadly they didn't include that in this remake. 
    edited February 25 StrangeDaysjbdragon
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