Grayshift becomes second service to promise forensic unlocks for Apple's iPhone 8 & X

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  • Reply 21 of 23
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,396member
    georgie01 said:
    I had initially thought the source code leak was probably insignificant, but with the timing of these two accouncements perhaps there was something significant Apple didn’t realise.

    Apple will most certainly fix the vulnerabilities at some point and then the chase will resume. For now, it’s good news for law enforcement agencies (with good intentions) and bad news for consumers until Apple fixes the issue(s).
    I'd almost be willing to bet that at some point in the past or today there have been US intelligence operatives posing as employees at Apple, collecting information to feed to the three letter agencies.

    Even with my tin foil hat on, that is a virtual certainty.  Of course, it's likely true of every other major tech company in the U.S. as well, along with many foreign ones.  Industrial espionage is a thing, and it's not just practiced by industry.
    And by the way, the FBI has been paying Best Buy Geek Squad employees to be informants. Interesting.

    https://www.eff.org/document/third-production-fbi-geek-squad-foia
  • Reply 22 of 23
    georgie01 said:
    I had initially thought the source code leak was probably insignificant, but with the timing of these two accouncements perhaps there was something significant Apple didn’t realise.

    Apple will most certainly fix the vulnerabilities at some point and then the chase will resume. For now, it’s good news for law enforcement agencies (with good intentions) and bad news for consumers until Apple fixes the issue(s).
    I'd almost be willing to bet that at some point in the past or today there have been US intelligence operatives posing as employees at Apple, collecting information to feed to the three letter agencies.

    Even with my tin foil hat on, that is a virtual certainty.  Of course, it's likely true of every other major tech company in the U.S. as well, along with many foreign ones.  Industrial espionage is a thing, and it's not just practiced by industry.
    And by the way, the FBI has been paying Best Buy Geek Squad employees to be informants. Interesting.

    https://www.eff.org/document/third-production-fbi-geek-squad-foia

    Of course they have.  People willingly give their passwords and total device access to someone who will fix it for them.  If the Geek Squad person happens to find illicit material on a device, and then informs the FBI, they have probable cause to seize it and get the password from the GS person, bypassing the 4th and 5th Amendments entirely.
  • Reply 23 of 23
    georgie01 said:
    I had initially thought the source code leak was probably insignificant, but with the timing of these two accouncements perhaps there was something significant Apple didn’t realise.

    Apple will most certainly fix the vulnerabilities at some point and then the chase will resume. For now, it’s good news for law enforcement agencies (with good intentions) and bad news for consumers until Apple fixes the issue(s).
    I'd almost be willing to bet that at some point in the past or today there have been US intelligence operatives posing as employees at Apple, collecting information to feed to the three letter agencies.

    Even with my tin foil hat on, that is a virtual certainty.  Of course, it's likely true of every other major tech company in the U.S. as well, along with many foreign ones.  Industrial espionage is a thing, and it's not just practiced by industry.
    And by the way, the FBI has been paying Best Buy Geek Squad employees to be informants. Interesting.

    https://www.eff.org/document/third-production-fbi-geek-squad-foia
    What a waste of money. 
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