iPhone unlocking tool GrayKey sees increased use across all levels of law enforcement

13»

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 47
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,233member
    Apple should eliminate the codes and stick with just Touch ID and Face ID
    You are forced by law to unlock by using your fingerprint. You are NOT forced by law to unlock by using a passcode. Apple should not change any of their settings. They should bring a 4th amendment lawsuit against every department using this bullshit.
    If Apple were ever able to implement an alpha/numeric/character password on an iOS device, cracking time would increase to months.
    They’ve had that since iPhone OS 3 or earlier. What they DON’T have is the ability to use different language keyboards with that passcode, AND I WANT THAT. What’s more secure than a password written in a language you can’t even read?
    edited April 13 watto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 47
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,583member
    thisisasj said: And if you're backing up your iPhone to iCloud stop it. Apple will hand over all of that backup if they are required by law. The last time I checked, your iCloud backups are not encrypted.
    Yes they are encrypted.  https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202303

    Plus, read this to see all the steps Apple takes to keep your phone and keychain data safe: https://www.networkworld.com/article/2174973/smartphones/apple-reveals-unprecedented-details-in-ios-security.html ; Pretty sure no other company would bother going to these extremes to protect user data.


    baconstang
  • Reply 43 of 47
    I think that Apple will not circumvent this method. It's perfect - now goverment have abillity, general public have not. Everybody happy
  • Reply 44 of 47
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 18,695member
    welshdog said:
    thisisasj said: And if you're backing up your iPhone to iCloud stop it. Apple will hand over all of that backup if they are required by law. The last time I checked, your iCloud backups are not encrypted.
    Yes they are encrypted.  https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202303

    Plus, read this to see all the steps Apple takes to keep your phone and keychain data safe: https://www.networkworld.com/article/2174973/smartphones/apple-reveals-unprecedented-details-in-ios-security.html ; Pretty sure no other company would bother going to these extremes to protect user data.


    Yes they are encrypted. And yes Apple can un-encrypt them in a readable format if needed for business reasons or ordered by law to do so. If your data is stored/backed up to Apple cloud services you have given Apple permission to share it under certain specific circumstances when you accepted their TOS. Based on comments here from the presumably more knowledgeable users there's probably a high percentage of casual users who don't understand that.
    edited April 14
  • Reply 45 of 47
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,543member
    mattinoz said:
    jbdragon said:
    epicurus said:
    I opted to go with the old traditional way of a random alpha numeric, character typed password, more then the 4 or 6 character password.. not that i have anything criminal on my phone, it’s still no bodies business to touch my phone ever.. 
    I’m using a 8 diget passcode, but looks like I’ll be switching to a longer alpha numeric.  Maybe even turn on the wipe feature if to many wrong passwords are entered.  
    The entire point of this tool is that it bypasses the attempt limit to bypass the wipe feature.
    Sounds like it's time for Apple to optionally require second factor after a number of attempts then. Include ability to ping your other or families devices in find my friends (phone) to let them know it might be in wrongful hands.
    It wouldn’t “know” that was happening since most likely they’re cloning the thing each time. Also when your phone gets stolen they disconnect from the internet, otherwise you could just remote wipe in Lost Mode. 
  • Reply 46 of 47
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,543member


    MplsP said:
    Honestly, my main concern with this is that Greykey sells a completely unlocked, untethered version that could be stolen and used by whomever. 
    Or purchased by anyone with the $. There are huge stolen iPhone rings out there. I had mine stolen in Spain and was still getting phishing texts/emails trying to get me to sign into a fake page with my Apple ID to unlock my X. At least I can rest knowing they're staring at a $1150 paperweight... unless they get a tool like this, in which case they could potentially unlock it in 3 days.
    Assuming that you put an Apple Lock on it through "Find My iPhone", they would still need your Apple ID password to unlock it.
    True, though I’m conflating two issues here — in this case they’d have access to all of my data. 
  • Reply 47 of 47
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,543member

    volcan said:
    I'd rather have no password. I have nothing on my iPhone that is secret or even private. My various collection of women all have each other's contact info. A couple years ago I had a serious medical condition that was life threatening. Fortunately my attorney was able to access all my contacts while I was in the ER due to no password. Saved my life. I'd rather risk any privacy concerns over first responders not being able to access my info quickly.
    Why would you not just use the emergency contacts/medical ID features which you can access on a locked phone?

Sign In or Register to comment.