Apple ushers in most advanced iPhone recycling robot 'Daisy' alongside Earth Day donations...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 2018
Apple is continuing to further its environmental credentials by announcing a number of initiatives ahead of Earth Day, including charitable donations for devices received as part of the Apple GiveBack program, and the introduction of a new iPhone recycling robot called Daisy.

Apple Daisy recycling robot Apple iPhone


Running until April 30, Apple pledges to make a donation to the non-profit Conservation International for every device received at Apple Stores and Apple.com under the Apple GiveBack program. Customers handing in their devices will continue to receive credit for an in-store purchase or an Apple Store gift card for future use for participating in the scheme.

Founded in 1987, Conservation International is an organization aimed at protecting the environment, using a combination of science, partnerships, and policy changes with a number of companies, communities, and countries around the world. It has helped support 1,200 protected areas and interventions across 77 countries, safeguarding more than 601 million hectares of land, marine, and coastal areas in the process.

"We are thrilled to have Apple's support for Conservation International's critical work to protect nature for people everywhere," said Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan. According to the CEO, the environmental organization "is proud to partner with Apple in giving consumers a great reason to join our movement."

"Apple's efforts to use recycled materials in its products represent the future of sustainable manufacturing," Sanjayan adds. "Apple is showing the world how it's done."

"At Apple, we're constantly working toward smart solutions to address climate change and conserve our planet's precious resources," said Lisa Jackson, Apple's vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. "In recognition of Earth Day, we are making it as simple as possible for our customers to recycle devices and do something good for the planet through Apple GiveBack."

Apple Daisy recycling robot Apple iPhone


The latest version of Apple's recycling robot, Daisy is a machine used to disassemble an iPhone, which Apple claims has become the most efficient way to reclaim more of the valuable materials used in each device. Daisy is capable of taking apart nine versions of iPhone and sorting the components for recycling, working at a rate of up to 200 iPhones per hour.

Apple used technology it developed based what the firm learned from the creation of its first disassembly robot, Liam, which the company debuted in 2016. Continuing the recycling theme, Daisy actually reuses some of the parts used in Liam alongside other changes to the robot's design.

Daisy, and predecessor Liam, were created to allow Apple to recover materials inside an iPhone that traditional recyclers cannot, as well as to achieve a higher quality of acquired material from each device.

Apple Daisy recycling robot Apple iPhone


To raise awareness of Earth Day, Apple Watch users will receive a notification about a special Earth Day Challenge later today, requiring them to go outside and complete a workout consisting of at least 30 minutes on the day itself on Sunday, April 22. Those completing the task will receive a special achievement and unique stickers in iMessage.

Starting tomorrow, Apple Store locations around the world will also honor Earth Day by adding window decals and logos with green leaves.

Apple has a history of promoting environmentalism and creating internal programs to make the company greener. Last year, it was revealed Apple protected and created enough sustainable forestland to cover all the paper used in its packaging, effectively achieving a net-zero impact on the world's virgin fiber.

On April 9, Apple announced its entire global operation, from offices to retail stores, are completely powered by renewable energy resources, and has also convinced 23 partner companies in its supply chain to pledge to reach 100 percent renewable energy usage in the future.

Apple has also recently opposed a proposal from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to repeal the Clean Power Plan, which would set standards for reduced greenhouse emissions from power plants. The company argued that scrapping the CPP would threaten investments already sunk into renewable power.
patchythepirate

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    I’m curious to know if there is only 1 Daisy or if there are several.  I had the same question regarding Liam.  Does anyone know if Apple uses it continuously or is this more of an effort to show what is possible?  Assuming Daisy runs uninterrupted it would process 4800 iPhones a day, seems decent.  It also makes me wonder how many iPhones Apple receives for recycling every day.
    randominternetpersonstanthemanjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 9
    Very awesome. One of the many reasons my loyalty to apple inc. remains strong. 
    minicoffeewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    So, anyone pick up on the connection between Apple naming a disassembly robot Daisy, and the song that HAL 9000 sings as Dave is disassembling it?

     


    jbdragonrobin hubertallest skilpatchythepirateminicoffeeiqatedojony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,070member
    The more the better. And designing robots for repair tasks would make sense.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,214member
    Can YouTube in any Apple product, or just iPhones? I have an old AirPort I’d like to get some credit for. 
  • Reply 6 of 9
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 1,884member
    I’m curious to know if there is only 1 Daisy or if there are several.  I had the same question regarding Liam.  Does anyone know if Apple uses it continuously or is this more of an effort to show what is possible?  Assuming Daisy runs uninterrupted it would process 4800 iPhones a day, seems decent.  It also makes me wonder how many iPhones Apple receives for recycling every day.
    Liam was a proof of concept. It could only disassemble a couple iPhone models and was not a machine actively used for recycling. From the way this article reads ("reuses parts from Liam"), Daisy is another proof of concept, though apparently more effective (can disassemble 9 models).

    Apple won't stop releasing different models every year, so I'm not confident that these recycling robots will ever be able to catch up and be used in a practical manner, especially when they're merely proof of concept devices. It's like Apple's robotics construction is just an incredibly expensive marketing tool (and therefore just a "hobby" project).

    i hope that, at some point, a disassembly robot will be robust enough that a new disassembly template and script can be adapted to it without building an all-new robot...
  • Reply 7 of 9
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,932member
    dysamoria said:
    I’m curious to know if there is only 1 Daisy or if there are several.  I had the same question regarding Liam.  Does anyone know if Apple uses it continuously or is this more of an effort to show what is possible?  Assuming Daisy runs uninterrupted it would process 4800 iPhones a day, seems decent.  It also makes me wonder how many iPhones Apple receives for recycling every day.
    Liam was a proof of concept. It could only disassemble a couple iPhone models and was not a machine actively used for recycling. From the way this article reads ("reuses parts from Liam"), Daisy is another proof of concept, though apparently more effective (can disassemble 9 models).

    Apple won't stop releasing different models every year, so I'm not confident that these recycling robots will ever be able to catch up and be used in a practical manner, especially when they're merely proof of concept devices. It's like Apple's robotics construction is just an incredibly expensive marketing tool (and therefore just a "hobby" project).

    i hope that, at some point, a disassembly robot will be robust enough that a new disassembly template and script can be adapted to it without building an all-new robot...


    Well Apple is getting quite a bit of recyled stuff out of these devices including 2,204 pounds of gold in 2015. Or about 40 million dollars. Of the 90 million pounds of e-waste through its recycling programs, Apple said 61 million was in reusable materials. Apple also collected 23 million pounds of steel; 13 million pounds of plastic; 12 million pounds of glass.

    The company also recently started using a new experimental line of robots dubbed Liam. They're designed to disassemble 1.2 million phones a year, sorting all their various components. Liam prototypes are operating in California and the Netherlands.

    So you're pretty wrong on all counts.

    http://money.cnn.com/2016/04/15/technology/apple-gold-recycling/index.html
    edited April 2018
  • Reply 8 of 9
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,593member
    That robot is literally smokin'!
  • Reply 9 of 9
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 284member
    dysamoria said:
    I’m curious to know if there is only 1 Daisy or if there are several.  I had the same question regarding Liam.  Does anyone know if Apple uses it continuously or is this more of an effort to show what is possible?  Assuming Daisy runs uninterrupted it would process 4800 iPhones a day, seems decent.  It also makes me wonder how many iPhones Apple receives for recycling every day.
    Liam was a proof of concept. It could only disassemble a couple iPhone models and was not a machine actively used for recycling. From the way this article reads ("reuses parts from Liam"), Daisy is another proof of concept, though apparently more effective (can disassemble 9 models).

    Apple won't stop releasing different models every year, so I'm not confident that these recycling robots will ever be able to catch up and be used in a practical manner, especially when they're merely proof of concept devices. It's like Apple's robotics construction is just an incredibly expensive marketing tool (and therefore just a "hobby" project).

    i hope that, at some point, a disassembly robot will be robust enough that a new disassembly template and script can be adapted to it without building an all-new robot...
    What's your source for that?  Doesn't match up with what Apple is saying. Also, also your observation that the robots will never be able to used in a practical sense doesn't match up with the fact that one robot can currently recycle 5000 phones per day, or almost 2 million in a year. Hardly a proof of concept. And that was an update from their previous version, Liam which Apple said each one could recycle 1.2 million per year.  Since you don't recycle the most current versions of phones, it also doesn't make sense that "Apple will never catch up" because they have new phones each year.  Indeed, the Daisy version can currently recycle 9 versions of Apple phones, up from 3, so they appear to already able to recycle most phones they've made, and at their rate of improvement, the next version would be able to recycle every phone ever made.
    edited April 2018 jony0watto_cobra
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