LTE Apple Watch Series 3 now available in India without monthly wireless fee [u]

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited May 11
Seven months after GPS-only versions of Apple Watch Series 3 went up for sale in India, customers in the country can now buy LTE-capable models of the wearable through two major wireless carriers.

Apple Watch Series 3


Airtel and Reliance Jio began Apple Watch Series 3 + Cellular sales on Friday local time, but unlike previous launches in the U.S. and beyond, the Indian telcos are offering customers free integration with existing postpaid plans. That means users can share their handset's wireless number, voice and data plan with Apple's smartwatch for no extra fee.

Apple updated its regional Apple Watch webpage to reflect the change in availability, highlighting marquee cellular capabilities including voice calling and texts, music streaming, Siri connectivity, standalone notifications and more.

As the company does not yet operate its own retail channel in India, sales of Apple Watch and other products are handled by local partners. Along with the usual assortment of authorized Apple retailers, both Airtel and Jio are selling Watch online and at their respective brick-and-mortar stores.

While customers in India save on wireless fees, which run about $10 per month in most countries, Apple Watch Series 3 + Cellular base prices start at an exorbitant 39,080 rupees ($580) for 38mm aluminum variants including Apple Watch Nike+. Identical models sell for $329 in the U.S. Larger 42mm aluminum models come in at 41,120 rupees, while the ceramic Edition sells for 1,22,090 rupees.

Whether stainless steel models will be widely available is unclear, as Airtel, Jio and reseller Aptronix currently lack listings for the specification. Another large chain, Imagine, provides an option to preorder stainless steel variants on its website, but fails to disclose pricing.

Though not a launch country, India was among a second batch of regions to gain access to GPS enabled Watch versions last October. Apple typically staggers device rollouts, with major markets like the U.S. and China getting first crack at new products. Regulatory approval, carrier support and other behind-the-scenes factors also play roles in product launch timing.

LTE Apple Watch Series 3 sales also kicked off in Denmark, Sweden and Taiwan on Friday.

Apple Watch continues to gain marketshare as competing devices fall off the map. During Apple's most recent earnings conference call, CEO Tim Cook said the firm's wearables business, which includes Apple Watch, Beats headphones, and AirPods, grew nearly 50 percent year-over-year, with revenues equivalent to a Fortune 300 company.





Update: Additional country availability added.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,190member
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    lollivernetroxkuduGeorgeBMacanantksundaramjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 24
    Indian prices for any Apple product are only “exorbitant” if they did not already include VAT and protectionist customs duties. 

    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 24
    hentaiboyhentaiboy Posts: 712member
    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 
    You can add currency hedging. 
  • Reply 4 of 24
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,720member
    Indian prices for any Apple product are only “exorbitant” if they did not already include VAT and protectionist customs duties. 

    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 
    True. There is no way Apple will price iPhone higher in any country than US. 
  • Reply 5 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never rarely being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access is an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    edited May 11 muthuk_vanalingamGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 6 of 24
    roakeroake Posts: 583member
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    Blah blah blah
    jbdragon
  • Reply 7 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    roake said:
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    Blah blah blah
    Brilliant rebuttal as to why an entirely separate network node with a unique MEID should be completely free because of your misplaced entitlement¡
    muthuk_vanalingamslprescottGeorgeBMacrazorpit
  • Reply 8 of 24
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 2,894member
    Indian prices for any Apple product are only “exorbitant” if they did not already include VAT and protectionist customs duties. 

    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 


    True. We pay 30% more on all Apple products due to the import taxes.

  • Reply 9 of 24
    Indian prices for any Apple product are only “exorbitant” if they did not already include VAT and protectionist customs duties. 

    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 


    True. We pay 30% more on all Apple products due to the import taxes.

    More than 30%, I would say. But this does not seem to apply for few products (like the SE, iPad 2017/2018 etc), which are assembled locally in India.
  • Reply 10 of 24
    asciiascii Posts: 5,815member
    When you eat an Indian curry do all the alarms on the watch start going off? Heart rate abnormal, contact medical professional immediately!!
    libertyforall
  • Reply 11 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 2,742member
    Soli said:
    roake said:
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    Blah blah blah
    Brilliant rebuttal as to why an entirely separate network node with a unique MEID should be completely free because of your misplaced entitlement¡
    Well, you wanted to argue those silly, old fashioned things called facts.   Hasn't anyone told you that facts are out of date?   That we're in a post-truth world and we get whatever it is that we want?

    Come on!  Try to keep up here!
    Soli
  • Reply 12 of 24
    AsterusAsterus Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    tzeshan said:
    Indian prices for any Apple product are only “exorbitant” if they did not already include VAT and protectionist customs duties. 

    Taxation is the only reason for US price to foreign price differentiation’s. 
    True. There is no way Apple will price iPhone higher in any country than US. 
    What a bullshit. Apple products are more expensive in almost every country I know comparing to US. At lease in EU and Russia for sure.

    Ireland iPhone X: From €1,179 (roughly 1,408 USD) - https://www.apple.com/ie/shop/buy-iphone/iphone-x
    USA iPhone X: from $999 - https://www.apple.com/shop/buy-iphone/iphone-x

    Still complaining?
  • Reply 13 of 24
    libertyforalllibertyforall Posts: 1,230member
    I already pay ~>$900/yr which is enough for iPhone service to ATT, they don’t need to gouge me another $120/yr to add Apple Watch!  
    anantksundaramjbdragon
  • Reply 14 of 24
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 828member
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.
    @"robin huber" might be spot-on with the $15/month price. Or are you unaware that it's pretty common for US cellular carriers to advertise a price then gouge the customer with the fine print and add on all sorts of fees? Then taxes get added to that. Some people are reporting total charges of about $15/month: https://www.macrumors.com/2017/12/18/apple-watch-series-3-fees-reactivation/

    But as for BMW being the most outrageous, perhaps you haven't run across mainframe software licensing: some vendors charge according to CPU speed, amount of RAM, number of concurrent users, number of CPU cores, number of CPUs, etc. Seriously, amount of RAM on the machine affects the cost?
  • Reply 15 of 24
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 18,648member
    ascii said:
    When you eat an Indian curry do all the alarms on the watch start going off? Heart rate abnormal, contact medical professional immediately!!
    WTF is “Indian curry”?
  • Reply 16 of 24
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,190member
    ascii said:
    When you eat an Indian curry do all the alarms on the watch start going off? Heart rate abnormal, contact medical professional immediately!!
    WTF is “Indian curry”?
    As opposed to Thai curry? 🤓
    razorpit
  • Reply 17 of 24
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,190member
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never rarely being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access is an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    You’re right, ATT charges $10, not $15—my faulty memory. But they also charge a $25 activation fee which pretty much cancels out the the first three months free bit. [The whole first x months free come-on always annoys me because the benefit accrues to the seller—the gift that keeps on giving. Over the, say, five year life of the watch would be a negligible 50 cents a month savings to me. Would rather they just knock the monthly fee by a buck or two so the longer I have the service the more valuable the discount becomes. But that’s another story.] 

    Honestly, it’s mostly your 1) for me. I just wouldn’t use it enough to justify the cost. Perhaps a tiered service? For less money I would gladly accept a call limits on the watch. I was unaware that the mechanics of allowing the watch to be a phone ”extension” were as burdensome to the carrier as you describe. I strongly suspect though that the $10/mo charge is not a break-even proposition for them. But rather a profit center. No sin in that; the question is, is it excessive (gouging)? Would love the FCC to do an audit an publish the actual costs vs. price. 
    jbdragon
  • Reply 18 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    Soli said:
    Waiting for American telcos to follow suit before upgrading. I refuse to pay $15 a month for what is basically an extension. Free money for AT&T. Only BMW’s monthly fee for CarPlay is more outrageous. 
    1) What carrier charges you $15 per month? Even Verizon only charges you $10 per month, and that's with a the first 3 months free and no activation fee.

    2) I'm curious why you believe it should be free simply because 1) you personally won't use it much, and/or 2) you think it's the same effort by the carrier because the phone number is the same. If you're on this website you understand that they're adding additional service to the device so that that it can dynamically switch between how calls are routed to independent nodes on a network that makes it convenient for the customer than having to give it two separate phone numbers. You should also be well aware that the phone number isn't the number that these devices use to connect with and stay connected to the towers right. I'm not 100% versed in how cellular networks are designed as my background as an CCIE for Routing & Switching didn't cover it, but I believe they use an MEID that identifies each node as a unique on the network, which isn't unlike a MAC address for Ethernet, WiFi and BT network node connections.

    3 Why are dumb phone used for emergency purposes that have no grace period, an activation setup, and a monthly charge not a big deal for people like you despite never rarely being used, but a device that is continually being used for cellular access is an issue. The size of the device shouldn't make a difference. Now there are more people using a better device for safety and a lower price than before. This is a good thing.
    You’re right, ATT charges $10, not $15—my faulty memory. But they also charge a $25 activation fee which pretty much cancels out the the first three months free bit. [The whole first x months free come-on always annoys me because the benefit accrues to the seller—the gift that keeps on giving. Over the, say, five year life of the watch would be a negligible 50 cents a month savings to me. Would rather they just knock the monthly fee by a buck or two so the longer I have the service the more valuable the discount becomes. But that’s another story.] 

    Honestly, it’s mostly your 1) for me. I just wouldn’t use it enough to justify the cost. Perhaps a tiered service? For less money I would gladly accept a call limits on the watch. I was unaware that the mechanics of allowing the watch to be a phone ”extension” were as burdensome to the carrier as you describe. I strongly suspect though that the $10/mo charge is not a break-even proposition for them. But rather a profit center. No sin in that; the question is, is it excessive (gouging)? Would love the FCC to do an audit an publish the actual costs vs. price. 
    1) When I added mine last year there was 3 months for free and no activation fee. Today their website shows a $30 activation fee.


    2) It wasn't that long ago when having an emergency, wearable device for making mobile calls cost a lot more money. If you're elderly or just a long distance runner that likes the benefit of the Apple Watch then I don't think $10 is an unreasonable fee to connect an entirely new device to their network. Even that emergency dumb phone that doesn't get any use is still $10 per month for the line. I think the problem with most people here is they think that because it conveniently allows the phone number to be mirrored and the devices talk to the carrier to determine which device should ring, that it's somehow not a separate device on the network, which is an insane thought considering how mobile networks works and the extra work carriers did to make this a great feature for users. I certainly don't want people calling me on one device and then asking them to call me back on the other.

    3) I wonder if it's feasible for Apple to add a GPS beacon feature to the Apple Watch. I think the tech is too big right now, and I have no idea what kind of antenna setup is required, but we all know that cellular connectivity is limited, but being able to send a periodic distress signal to a satellite from nearly anywhere in the world would be a great amazing.


    But even if it was technologically feasible, I'm not sure it would outweigh the space needed for other features, like direct health features or a larger battery; and I think there are logistics issues with including it on a device where someone may need immediate medical attention and not realize that use the GPS beacon is considerably slower and not really used for when you fall down in your kitchen.
  • Reply 19 of 24
    asciiascii Posts: 5,815member
    ascii said:
    When you eat an Indian curry do all the alarms on the watch start going off? Heart rate abnormal, contact medical professional immediately!!
    WTF is “Indian curry”?
    With a username like that I take it you're about to school me on the intricacies of Indian food.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 20 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    ascii said:
    When you eat an Indian curry do all the alarms on the watch start going off? Heart rate abnormal, contact medical professional immediately!!
    WTF is “Indian curry”?
    I don't understand your question. Curry is prepared differently across cultures and countries. I bet I could tell the country and even the general region of a dish based on the flavor of its curry.
    edited May 11
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