'EasyMesh' standard could simplify Wi-Fi mesh networks, allow interoperability

Posted:
in General Discussion
A newly-introduced Wi-Fi standard, EasyMesh, could potentially simplify the growing mesh router market and let people mix and match satellite units from different makers.

One mesh product, the Linksys Velop.
One mesh product, the Linksys Velop.


EasyMesh-compatible routers will be able to monitor conditions and adapt as needed, providing a single seamless network, the Wi-Fi Alliance said on Monday. It added that owners will not only be able to use routers from multiple vendors, but match anything already EasyMesh-ready with future hardware.

The Alliance didn't immediately identify routers or manufacturers that would support the standard.

There are relatively few mesh options on the market. The forerunners are typically considered to be Eero, Linksys Velop, Netgear Orbi, Google WiFi, and Ubiquity AmpliFi HD.

Mesh routers provide better coverage than their counterparts by using one or more satellites. While similar in concept to extenders, mesh systems don't require the creation of multiple SSIDs, and will automatically shuttle devices between the best possible connection points. Some models may have dedicated backhaul bands to ensure maximum speeds.

Apple recently discontinued its AirPort line, and began selling the Velop as an alternative.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,328member
    [...] but match anything already EasyMesh-ready with future hardware.
    Shouldn't that be future software (or firmware) update?

    Ubiquity AmpliFi HD.
    It's Ubituiti
  • Reply 2 of 9
    jvmbjvmb Posts: 53member
    Extenders don’t require a new ssid. You just need to make sure the passwords are the same. The hand off when you move around the house should be better with a setup designed for connecting you to the best access point. 

    To me only the Orbi makes sense for a mid size house. The Orbi is not really a mesh router though. All satellites talk to the base station via the dedicated backhaul channel. It is basically a range extender set up with easier setup.
    tokyojimu
  • Reply 3 of 9
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,645member
    jvmb said:
    Extenders don’t require a new ssid. You just need to make sure the passwords are the same. The hand off when you move around the house should be better with a setup designed for connecting you to the best access point. 

    To me only the Orbi makes sense for a mid size house. The Orbi is not really a mesh router though. All satellites talk to the base station via the dedicated backhaul channel. It is basically a range extender set up with easier setup.
    That is the definition if a mesh router. The super fast back haul is what provides speed and bandwidth that an extender cannot.
    Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,310member
    I’m glad to see there’s a standard introduced. I hope this also includes a standard, expectable profile so that, say, I have an Eero setup that I decide to replace in 5 years with a Linksys setup and all I have to do to get most of the settings and configuration complete is to import the Eeros config file.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    rktman2rktman2 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Maybe the software standard will help Netgear actually put out a product that works reliably, unlike the Orbi. Still waiting on firmware that delivers what the product is advertised to do.
  • Reply 6 of 9
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 2,746member

    How does setting up a roaming network via Ethernet using multiple AirPort base stations compare to setting up a mesh network?

  • Reply 7 of 9
    vanfrunikenvanfruniken Posts: 251member
    Apple's New Opportunity for a Multi(router)platform Airport Utility.

    Now that Apple is discontinuing its Airport line and more standards are emerging, it may be time to re-engineer Airport Utility to now also take into account third party routers.
    This would constitute a major benefit to the average networking knowledge challenged consumer, where no further knowledge of each and every brand's configuration (usually web) utility would be required.

    A cheap and powerful way for Apple to make its ecosystem more attractive: Apple owners being able to manage everyone else's hardware. Think of it as a servicenow that Apple is getting out of the router hardware business.

    (Of course, third parties have the opportunity to create new standards, and could supply their own plugins or APIs, to actually provide their own multi(router) utilities -- Apple: don't miss this chance to pick up on the idea first).

    The restriction of Airport Utility not being able to recognize third party routers has been an old sore since the beginning of time. 
    edited May 15
  • Reply 8 of 9
    adm1adm1 Posts: 806member

    How does setting up a roaming network via Ethernet using multiple AirPort base stations compare to setting up a mesh network?

    End result is the same really, only a mesh network doesn't require the ethernet backhaul. If you are already pre-wired then stick with it. 


    There are also mesh networks that utilise a powerline connection as backhaul (Sky Q for example). 

    I ran a Sky Q mesh from 2016 to 2017 and even with 5 satellites positioned around the house, I struggled to stream 1080p video, let alone 4K. I suspect this was a fault with the Sky hardware as I've since replaced the 7x in total Q boxes with a single Vodafone 802.11ac fibre router and my coverage is much better around the house, it actually penetrates my 1900era internal stone walls.
    bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 9 of 9
    Ubiquity AmpliFi HD.
    cpsro said:
    It's
    Ubituiti
    Actually, it's Ubiquiti
    edited May 16
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