Apple Watch's heart rate sensors alert man to undiagnosed atrial fibrillation

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 36
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Soli said:
    deminsd said:
    You don't know your heart rate is racing at 161bpm until an Apple Watch alerts you?
    ߤ榺wj;♂️
    I have an uncle who was frog-marched to hospital by my aunt because his shortness of breath was not getting better. 

    What she thought was pneumonia turned out to be a heart attack. Not only that, but after a thorough battery of tests the doctors informed that this was probably the smaller of two heart attacks he’d suffered in a week. 

    The week ended with a bypass and drugs he’ll need to take for the rest of his life. 

    So yes, it’s entirely possible that someone might not notice an unusually fast heart rate. 
    And how does one tell if it's a heart attack v panic attack v asthma attack or any other potential ailment? I only know what my max heart range is from years of looking at my heart rate whilst exercising when pushing myself to the limit and feeling everything throb. I have a statistical history in which to draw comparisons about is and isn't normal for me for a given level of exertion. And that's range, like ±10 BPM (at best), not some weirdly specific 161, as the OP questioned as if we can determine our exact BPM just by thinking about it.
    The article didn't pick some "weirdly specific 161".  That is the rate the man's heart was beating WHILE HE WAS AT REST.  (which is how the A-Fib monitoring works -- it knows if you're exercising or not).

    And, while it can screen out elevated HR's from exercise, it can't screen the other things you mentioned such as panic attack.   That's why all it does is warn you and help you get in touch with a physician for a full assessment.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 36
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,233member
    I have my own story. Yesterday, I was on my couch reading. I hear a ping from my Apple Watch. My resting heart rate is 122. Normally it’s 74.

    i checked it for about 5 minutes in case it was a fluke. It wasn’t. I then got up to go to the bathroom, and it went to 133. I walked upstairs because at that time I was concerned and wanted to get ready to leave, in case. It went to 145.

    while washing up it went to 160. We called the emergency room and they said to come right in, which we did.

    i’m lying in a hospital bed as I type this on my phone. Apparently I have, and excuse my spelling, tachycardia, a high resting heart rate. So far, everything checks out fine, but the problem is there. We’ll see what happens.
    SoliFolioGeorgeBMacnetroxwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Soli said:
    deminsd said:
    You don't know your heart rate is racing at 161bpm until an Apple Watch alerts you?
    ߤ榺wj;♂️
    I have an uncle who was frog-marched to hospital by my aunt because his shortness of breath was not getting better. 

    What she thought was pneumonia turned out to be a heart attack. Not only that, but after a thorough battery of tests the doctors informed that this was probably the smaller of two heart attacks he’d suffered in a week. 

    The week ended with a bypass and drugs he’ll need to take for the rest of his life. 

    So yes, it’s entirely possible that someone might not notice an unusually fast heart rate. 
    And how does one tell if it's a heart attack v panic attack v asthma attack or any other potential ailment? I only know what my max heart range is from years of looking at my heart rate whilst exercising when pushing myself to the limit and feeling everything throb. I have a statistical history in which to draw comparisons about is and isn't normal for me for a given level of exertion. And that's range, like ±10 BPM (at best), not some weirdly specific 161, as the OP questioned as if we can determine our exact BPM just by thinking about it.
    The article didn't pick some "weirdly specific 161".  That is the rate the man's heart was beating WHILE HE WAS AT REST.  (which is how the A-Fib monitoring works -- it knows if you're exercising or not).

    And, while it can screen out elevated HR's from exercise, it can't screen the other things you mentioned such as panic attack.   That's why all it does is warn you and help you get in touch with a physician for a full assessment.
    I'm aware of that. I'm referring to deminsd's comment suggesting that the man should "know" his BPM was 161. My comment is adding to Rayz, which is adding to my facepalm reply.


    melgross said:
    I have my own story. Yesterday, I was on my couch reading. I hear a ping from my Apple Watch. My resting heart rate is 122. Normally it’s 74.

    i checked it for about 5 minutes in case it was a fluke. It wasn’t. I then got up to go to the bathroom, and it went to 133. I walked upstairs because at that time I was concerned and wanted to get ready to leave, in case. It went to 145.

    while washing up it went to 160. We called the emergency room and they said to come right in, which we did.

    i’m lying in a hospital bed as I type this on my phone. Apparently I have, and excuse my spelling, tachycardia, a high resting heart rate. So far, everything checks out fine, but the problem is there. We’ll see what happens.
    I'm glad you were able to seek help in time.
    edited May 2018 FolioGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 36
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,233member
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Soli said:
    deminsd said:
    You don't know your heart rate is racing at 161bpm until an Apple Watch alerts you?
    ߤ榺wj;♂️
    I have an uncle who was frog-marched to hospital by my aunt because his shortness of breath was not getting better. 

    What she thought was pneumonia turned out to be a heart attack. Not only that, but after a thorough battery of tests the doctors informed that this was probably the smaller of two heart attacks he’d suffered in a week. 

    The week ended with a bypass and drugs he’ll need to take for the rest of his life. 

    So yes, it’s entirely possible that someone might not notice an unusually fast heart rate. 
    And how does one tell if it's a heart attack v panic attack v asthma attack or any other potential ailment? I only know what my max heart range is from years of looking at my heart rate whilst exercising when pushing myself to the limit and feeling everything throb. I have a statistical history in which to draw comparisons about is and isn't normal for me for a given level of exertion. And that's range, like ±10 BPM (at best), not some weirdly specific 161, as the OP questioned as if we can determine our exact BPM just by thinking about it.
    The article didn't pick some "weirdly specific 161".  That is the rate the man's heart was beating WHILE HE WAS AT REST.  (which is how the A-Fib monitoring works -- it knows if you're exercising or not).

    And, while it can screen out elevated HR's from exercise, it can't screen the other things you mentioned such as panic attack.   That's why all it does is warn you and help you get in touch with a physician for a full assessment.
    I'm aware of that. I'm referring to deminsd's comment suggesting that the man should "know" his BPM was 161. My comment is adding to Rayz, which is adding to my facepalm reply.


    melgross said:
    I have my own story. Yesterday, I was on my couch reading. I hear a ping from my Apple Watch. My resting heart rate is 122. Normally it’s 74.

    i checked it for about 5 minutes in case it was a fluke. It wasn’t. I then got up to go to the bathroom, and it went to 133. I walked upstairs because at that time I was concerned and wanted to get ready to leave, in case. It went to 145.

    while washing up it went to 160. We called the emergency room and they said to come right in, which we did.

    i’m lying in a hospital bed as I type this on my phone. Apparently I have, and excuse my spelling, tachycardia, a high resting heart rate. So far, everything checks out fine, but the problem is there. We’ll see what happens.
    I'm glad you were able to seek help in time.
    Thanks.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 36
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,159member
    Actually, my Apple Watch did alert me saying that my heart rate was over 120 several times but I felt "ok." I was a little down with some muscle aches but blamed on poor posture and sleeping. I also though I must have watched a cold or something. But it went on for a month. I had no insurance until the end of this month so I figured I'd just wait. But then I went down with a sharp stabbing pain in my back. I went to ER and it turned out I had pneumonia! My heart itself is fine but its beating faster than normal because its trying to get oxygen from badly infected lungs. 

    Now I am recovering and my heart rate is now less than 100. 

    So basically, when your heart is above 100 and you're not resting, you may have some underlying condition that needs to be checked out ASAP. 

    SoliGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 36
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    melgross said:
    I have my own story. Yesterday, I was on my couch reading. I hear a ping from my Apple Watch. My resting heart rate is 122. Normally it’s 74.

    i checked it for about 5 minutes in case it was a fluke. It wasn’t. I then got up to go to the bathroom, and it went to 133. I walked upstairs because at that time I was concerned and wanted to get ready to leave, in case. It went to 145.

    while washing up it went to 160. We called the emergency room and they said to come right in, which we did.

    i’m lying in a hospital bed as I type this on my phone. Apparently I have, and excuse my spelling, tachycardia, a high resting heart rate. So far, everything checks out fine, but the problem is there. We’ll see what happens.
    Best of luck to you!
    I hope the find the cause -- and the cure -- quickly!
    Please keep us posted!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 36
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    netrox said:
    Actually, my Apple Watch did alert me saying that my heart rate was over 120 several times but I felt "ok." I was a little down with some muscle aches but blamed on poor posture and sleeping. I also though I must have watched a cold or something. But it went on for a month. I had no insurance until the end of this month so I figured I'd just wait. But then I went down with a sharp stabbing pain in my back. I went to ER and it turned out I had pneumonia! My heart itself is fine but its beating faster than normal because its trying to get oxygen from badly infected lungs. 

    Now I am recovering and my heart rate is now less than 100. 

    So basically, when your heart is above 100 and you're not resting, you may have some underlying condition that needs to be checked out ASAP. 

    Glad to hear the Apple Watch alerted you and you got treatment.   But I hope it all held off long enough for you insurance to kick in...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 36
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,159member
    netrox said:
    Actually, my Apple Watch did alert me saying that my heart rate was over 120 several times but I felt "ok." I was a little down with some muscle aches but blamed on poor posture and sleeping. I also though I must have watched a cold or something. But it went on for a month. I had no insurance until the end of this month so I figured I'd just wait. But then I went down with a sharp stabbing pain in my back. I went to ER and it turned out I had pneumonia! My heart itself is fine but its beating faster than normal because its trying to get oxygen from badly infected lungs. 

    Now I am recovering and my heart rate is now less than 100. 

    So basically, when your heart is above 100 and you're not resting, you may have some underlying condition that needs to be checked out ASAP. 

    Glad to hear the Apple Watch alerted you and you got treatment.   But I hope it all held off long enough for you insurance to kick in...

    Well, my insurance will pay retroactively from April 1st but here's what's so bizarre... my primary doctor cannot accept me because mine is not active and I even said I'll pay cash but they cannot accept me. If I go to urgent care, I have to pay for it upfront and it's gonna cost a lot of money. If I go to ER, ER doesn't demand payment upfront but simply will bill to my insurance at end of this month and that should be taken care of. 

    So, this is a personal story of how Apple Watch really helped me know there's something wrong with me. I just wish I sought medical care earlier and want others to take it seriously if their watch alerts about high rate while resting. 
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 36
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,159member
    melgross said:
    I have my own story. Yesterday, I was on my couch reading. I hear a ping from my Apple Watch. My resting heart rate is 122. Normally it’s 74.

    i checked it for about 5 minutes in case it was a fluke. It wasn’t. I then got up to go to the bathroom, and it went to 133. I walked upstairs because at that time I was concerned and wanted to get ready to leave, in case. It went to 145.

    while washing up it went to 160. We called the emergency room and they said to come right in, which we did.

    i’m lying in a hospital bed as I type this on my phone. Apparently I have, and excuse my spelling, tachycardia, a high resting heart rate. So far, everything checks out fine, but the problem is there. We’ll see what happens.
    I had that experience and went to ER.. turns out I have atypical pneumonia. I didn't even feel that sick but X-rays, cat scan, and blood results all point to pneumonia and it's really bad. Just because your heart is beating faster than normal doesn't always mean there's a problem with the heart itself but there's something else going on causing the heart to beat faster than normal. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 30 of 36
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    Hope Melgross is feeling better. 
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 36
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    netrox said:
    netrox said:
    Actually, my Apple Watch did alert me saying that my heart rate was over 120 several times but I felt "ok." I was a little down with some muscle aches but blamed on poor posture and sleeping. I also though I must have watched a cold or something. But it went on for a month. I had no insurance until the end of this month so I figured I'd just wait. But then I went down with a sharp stabbing pain in my back. I went to ER and it turned out I had pneumonia! My heart itself is fine but its beating faster than normal because its trying to get oxygen from badly infected lungs. 

    Now I am recovering and my heart rate is now less than 100. 

    So basically, when your heart is above 100 and you're not resting, you may have some underlying condition that needs to be checked out ASAP. 

    Glad to hear the Apple Watch alerted you and you got treatment.   But I hope it all held off long enough for you insurance to kick in...

    Well, my insurance will pay retroactively from April 1st but here's what's so bizarre... my primary doctor cannot accept me because mine is not active and I even said I'll pay cash but they cannot accept me. If I go to urgent care, I have to pay for it upfront and it's gonna cost a lot of money. If I go to ER, ER doesn't demand payment upfront but simply will bill to my insurance at end of this month and that should be taken care of. 

    So, this is a personal story of how Apple Watch really helped me know there's something wrong with me. I just wish I sought medical care earlier and want others to take it seriously if their watch alerts about high rate while resting. 
    Sounds like a very confusing mess -- both health wise and financially.  But it sounds like you are dealing with it well and effectively.  Best of luck that ALL of it turns out well for you. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 36
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,233member
    Thank you guys.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobraRayz2016
  • Reply 33 of 36
    dm3dm3 Posts: 168member
    Apple watch heart rate can be HIGHLY inaccurate. I recorded a video just last week, where my Apple watch was reporting heart rates varying between 59 and 130 beats per minute. There was only one, major, problem. I was not wearing the watch at the time. I was holding it in the air with nothing behind it. Apple watch had alerted me to high heart rate a few days earlier. I became concerned, but then noticed the time and realized I was in the shower at the time and my watch was sitting on the counter. Its a serious issue to issue a false alarm measuring heart rate when its not even being worn.
    edited May 2018
  • Reply 34 of 36
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,233member
    dm3 said:
    Apple watch heart rate can be HIGHLY inaccurate. I recorded a video just last week, where my Apple watch was reporting heart rates varying between 59 and 130 beats per minute. There was only one, major, problem. I was not wearing the watch at the time. I was holding it in the air with nothing behind it. Apple watch had alerted me to high heart rate a few days earlier. I became concerned, but then noticed the time and realized I was in the shower at the time and my watch was sitting on the counter. Its a serious issue to issue a false alarm measuring heart rate when its not even being worn.
    That is meaningless. You’re not measuring g the heart rate of the atmosphere. It’s difficult to take that seriously. Put it on your wrist instead.

    while here in the hospital I’ve had several tests and those that measured heart rate tracked my watch almost perfectly, from no error, to two beats. One test had my rate suddenly drop from 126 to 85 within the space of a few seconds and back again. My watch tracked that. Exactly.
    watto_cobraGeorgeBMacRayz2016
  • Reply 35 of 36
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    dm3 said:
    Apple watch heart rate can be HIGHLY inaccurate. I recorded a video just last week, where my Apple watch was reporting heart rates varying between 59 and 130 beats per minute. There was only one, major, problem. I was not wearing the watch at the time. I was holding it in the air with nothing behind it. Apple watch had alerted me to high heart rate a few days earlier. I became concerned, but then noticed the time and realized I was in the shower at the time and my watch was sitting on the counter. Its a serious issue to issue a false alarm measuring heart rate when its not even being worn.
    So you reckon the watch is inaccurate because it can’t measure the heart rate of the atmosphere?

    This is like saying the Toyota Prius fails a safety test because people were injured while driving it along the seabed. 
    🙄
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 36 of 36
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    dm3 said:
    Apple watch heart rate can be HIGHLY inaccurate. I recorded a video just last week, where my Apple watch was reporting heart rates varying between 59 and 130 beats per minute. There was only one, major, problem. I was not wearing the watch at the time. I was holding it in the air with nothing behind it. Apple watch had alerted me to high heart rate a few days earlier. I became concerned, but then noticed the time and realized I was in the shower at the time and my watch was sitting on the counter. Its a serious issue to issue a false alarm measuring heart rate when its not even being worn.
    I'm trying to wrap my head around the rationale of this post. Why do you think Apple should've designed the system to measure anything other than being worn against the wrist, and why don't you think a light-based sensor shouldn't have any readings when being held up in whatever room you were in?
    GeorgeBMac
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