WPA3 will improve your Wi-Fi security, if your router supports it

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,542member
    melgross said:
    Soli said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    gatorguy said:
    I’m curious whether some modern hardware (such as eero or Google Home) can be flash updated to support WPA3, or if this requires specific hardware certification. 
    Word is that it can be. 
    Hopefully Eero doesn't charge you for it. I've had great experience with their product but I see they have an in-app purchase to get more features, but I haven't looked into what that actually offers. If Eero (and others) want to charge for improved security I'll be disappointed in them as a company, but maybe I shouldn't if they've never accounted for this eventual cost in the device's sale. Remember when Apple charged $1.99(?) for getting 802.11n flash to a NIC?
    I thought they originally wanted even more than that, maybe $4.99? I doubt that will ever get repeated. 

    Personally I can't see Google WiFi requiring an "upgrade fee" for WPA3 which should help serve to keep the other players in line too. 

    EDIT: You're correct, I had missed reading that. Eero is trying to suck a bit more from the buyers, pushing a subscription model and supposedly making that a requirement on new models? I can't see that going over well. 

    EDIT2: No that's Plume making a subscription the only option for their mesh routers. Eero is just strongly suggesting it.... for now. 
    $99 a year for Eero Plus gets you "content filtering, malicious site blocking, and subscriptions to other security products, like 1Password and a VPN".
    Ugh! Why would I want that? There’s nothing there that isn’t already being done by other software, or by safari.
    I’d like VPN on my home router, not each device.
    Very slow, and, as it turns out, very likely not as secure as you think.
    Can you explain both of those statements? Perhaps some evidence that backs up an inherent reduction in security for having a VPN on a router instead of on a device? Right now, I have a dozen devices that are too simple to have a VPN so my ISPs and any man-in-the-middle can at least monitor what kind of traffic and from what devices I'm sending, even if they're sending it out via SSL.
  • Reply 22 of 23
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,367member
    Soli said:
    melgross said:
    Soli said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    gatorguy said:
    I’m curious whether some modern hardware (such as eero or Google Home) can be flash updated to support WPA3, or if this requires specific hardware certification. 
    Word is that it can be. 
    Hopefully Eero doesn't charge you for it. I've had great experience with their product but I see they have an in-app purchase to get more features, but I haven't looked into what that actually offers. If Eero (and others) want to charge for improved security I'll be disappointed in them as a company, but maybe I shouldn't if they've never accounted for this eventual cost in the device's sale. Remember when Apple charged $1.99(?) for getting 802.11n flash to a NIC?
    I thought they originally wanted even more than that, maybe $4.99? I doubt that will ever get repeated. 

    Personally I can't see Google WiFi requiring an "upgrade fee" for WPA3 which should help serve to keep the other players in line too. 

    EDIT: You're correct, I had missed reading that. Eero is trying to suck a bit more from the buyers, pushing a subscription model and supposedly making that a requirement on new models? I can't see that going over well. 

    EDIT2: No that's Plume making a subscription the only option for their mesh routers. Eero is just strongly suggesting it.... for now. 
    $99 a year for Eero Plus gets you "content filtering, malicious site blocking, and subscriptions to other security products, like 1Password and a VPN".
    Ugh! Why would I want that? There’s nothing there that isn’t already being done by other software, or by safari.
    I’d like VPN on my home router, not each device.
    Very slow, and, as it turns out, very likely not as secure as you think.
    Can you explain both of those statements? Perhaps some evidence that backs up an inherent reduction in security for having a VPN on a router instead of on a device? Right now, I have a dozen devices that are too simple to have a VPN so my ISPs and any man-in-the-middle can at least monitor what kind of traffic and from what devices I'm sending, even if they're sending it out via SSL.
    The very slow is pretty obvious once you try to use it. I’m goi g mostly by reviews I’ve read. All VPNs, by the nature of the way they work, are very slow. The faster your normal speed is, the more you’ll notice it. Some of them are so slow, that speeds are measured in 10’s of thousands of bps.

    afain, as far as security goes, it depends on the vendor. Many of them are located in countries that are, at best, unregulated, and at worst, a wild Wild West. Check where the servers are. Do you really want to use a VPN located in Eastern Europe, or Russia, or China?
  • Reply 23 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,542member
    melgross said:
    Soli said:
    melgross said:
    Soli said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    gatorguy said:
    I’m curious whether some modern hardware (such as eero or Google Home) can be flash updated to support WPA3, or if this requires specific hardware certification. 
    Word is that it can be. 
    Hopefully Eero doesn't charge you for it. I've had great experience with their product but I see they have an in-app purchase to get more features, but I haven't looked into what that actually offers. If Eero (and others) want to charge for improved security I'll be disappointed in them as a company, but maybe I shouldn't if they've never accounted for this eventual cost in the device's sale. Remember when Apple charged $1.99(?) for getting 802.11n flash to a NIC?
    I thought they originally wanted even more than that, maybe $4.99? I doubt that will ever get repeated. 

    Personally I can't see Google WiFi requiring an "upgrade fee" for WPA3 which should help serve to keep the other players in line too. 

    EDIT: You're correct, I had missed reading that. Eero is trying to suck a bit more from the buyers, pushing a subscription model and supposedly making that a requirement on new models? I can't see that going over well. 

    EDIT2: No that's Plume making a subscription the only option for their mesh routers. Eero is just strongly suggesting it.... for now. 
    $99 a year for Eero Plus gets you "content filtering, malicious site blocking, and subscriptions to other security products, like 1Password and a VPN".
    Ugh! Why would I want that? There’s nothing there that isn’t already being done by other software, or by safari.
    I’d like VPN on my home router, not each device.
    Very slow, and, as it turns out, very likely not as secure as you think.
    Can you explain both of those statements? Perhaps some evidence that backs up an inherent reduction in security for having a VPN on a router instead of on a device? Right now, I have a dozen devices that are too simple to have a VPN so my ISPs and any man-in-the-middle can at least monitor what kind of traffic and from what devices I'm sending, even if they're sending it out via SSL.
    The very slow is pretty obvious once you try to use it. I’m goi g mostly by reviews I’ve read. All VPNs, by the nature of the way they work, are very slow. The faster your normal speed is, the more you’ll notice it. Some of them are so slow, that speeds are measured in 10’s of thousands of bps.
    Considering my comment said "on my home router, not each device" I don't see how a single VPN connection from my router would make my overall traffic from several Macs and iDevices more slow. I'm still going to use a VPN and while there is security overhead and the performance can never be a fast as my straight ISP connection for obvious reasons, it's minimal and unnoticeable in real world situations. Hell, SSL, CSS, JS add overhead, too, but I'll take all those over how websites worked decades ago.

    afain, as far as security goes, it depends on the vendor. Many of them are located in countries that are, at best, unregulated, and at worst, a wild Wild West. Check where the servers are. Do you really want to use a VPN located in Eastern Europe, or Russia, or China?

    I have had no reason to use a VPN server in those countries, and I foresee no reason to. I do like that they do offer servers all over the world but I couldn't tell you if my provider even offers any for communist countries with strict laws for internet access.

    I do, occasionally, use a VPN in the UK to get past the BBC iPlayer content blocker for streaming series that don't come to BBC America, but other than that I've only ever used servers located in the US.

    edited June 2018
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