Drake's Scorpion on Apple Music crushes Spotify in streaming

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  • Reply 61 of 67
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,341member
    avon b7 said:
    steven n. said:
    avon b7 said:
    steven n. said:

    Yes, I understand the 'record streaming' part. That's fine. What I don't understand is why it is even relevant, nor why Spotify is brought into it with comments on subscriber proportions.

    I don't see how one album in one snapshot is even remotely of interest to anyone but Drake.




    You seem to care a great deal. I simply don’t understand what is so mind numbingly difficult to understand about two competitors  product numbers and how this might relate to future/current health.
    What product numbers? None have been given. As I said above, one artist's data is irrelevant and doesn't constitute product numbers but simply Drake numbers.

    Also, as I said before, is it outlandish to think that those subscribers (on both platforms) who weren't streaming Drake, were just streaming something else? Surely what counts - from a platform perspective - is total streams, not if some of your subscribers happen to be listening to the same record at the same time. Beyond simply adding up streams there is nothing interesting here except for Drake (and breaking a streaming record) and no one has been able to offer anything as a way of an argument to support how this is relevant from a platform perspective.

    What counts is subscribers, then active subscribers. Subscriber numbers are important but if they are paying but not using the service you have a problem because at some point they could cancel the subscription. Active subscribers are better as they probably have a reason to keep subscribing and actively using the service.

    Apple wants more subscribers. Spotify wants more subscribers. Why wouldn't they?

    What those subscribers listen too at any given time is moot unless some streams report more profit than others (but do they and what are the details). We don't know. What we know is that individual artist stream tallies are not representative of very much at all.

    And we know that Drake won't be releasing something every week which makes the whole thing even more pointless.


    It was, by all accounts, a high water mark for the number of streams in twenty four hours, and according to the story, both Apple and Spotify promoted the album heavily to make that happen. 

    Apple, with fewer subscribers, came out on top in the competition, that both companies believed was "relevant" to participate in. 

    Better "luck" next time, Spotify...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 62 of 67
    gumashow said:
    I am not a prude. I have 10 and 11 year old sons and this is popular music. This Drake music is appalling. Offensive. Every other word is the N word. The F word. How can anyone use this as an example of anything? It’s disgusting. Let me explain, I’m a writer. When you have to use those words every sentence to make your point, you’re a weak storyteller who lacks ANY creativity. It’s lazy wrtitying and says nothing. Zero. Again, I’m not a downer but just cannot believe that this is somehow considered art, or a mainstream anything. I just pulled up Apple Music and it’s highlightedvand as the first thing that comes up. Sad. Truly sad — the state of music. As a parent, I’m offended by anyone, any company, anywhere, who highlights or points to this as something relevant. It’s trash. 
    Listen to Drake’s I’m Upset
    then listen to Genesis’ That’s All

    This is what people are talking about when they decry the state of music these days.  
    I’ll take “Things old white guys say about music” for 800, Alex.
    Best comment!  Lol

    But it’s not just being old that dictates the comparison.  Read again gumashow’s comment. It’s about respect, about being a civilized person, not merely appealing to the lowest common denominator or an audience’s base instincts.  

    For the record, I’m 55, girlfriend is 32.  I suppose she’s old too, as she would switch off Drake in favor of Genesis, in this example. 
    For the record, I guessed you were exactly 55 with the Genesis comment. 32yo women who listen to Genesis are an exceedingly rare bird, so congrats?

    But let’s be real. You want to go back to 2 Live Crew in the 90’s for a minute and come back to talk about Drake’s choice of language? I’m not a big Drake fan, but I do like a lot of his contemporaries, like A$AP Rocky and Kendrick Lamar. You know these people are producing number one albums, right? Drake has won almost 100 awards and has been nominated for nearly 500. Kendrick Lamar just won the Pulitzer for his music and he swears and drops the N word plenty. You know why you don’t get their language? They’re not speaking to you.

    Calling Drake uncivilized is pretty brazen. I’ll leave it at that. 

    You guys sound like the “What’s a Grimes” people in that thread. Or Jim Darymple reviewing Apple Music and complaining about too many hip hops in the new music sections when all he wants to listen to are the same 40 year old AC/DC albums he’s always listened to.
    For the most part, I’d leave the 90s out of it.  Not a great decade.
    unless u liked to pop an e and rave all night long. hardcore techno techno techno techno!  B)  still better than this hippety hop sh*te.
  • Reply 63 of 67
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    maestro64 said:
    These metrics does not mean people were actually listening. I stream music in my house on the weekends and I can tell you many times we are not listening to what is playing. Also Spotify stated that they  put the song in their most popular play lists it does not mean people wanted to hear the song or were even listening.

    The real metric would be request to hear the song. The current metric is push verses a pull, a pull for content has more meaning.
    Both Apple Music and Spotify pay royalties per stream, so tens of millions of streams per day is not just blowing out of speakers on autopilot.

    All this thought put into trying to explain why the leading artist globally is not really worthy of mention or isn't really popular sounds a lot like people who can't grasp that the world outside of them is not anything like what they imagine it to be.

    Regardless, Apple Music doesn't have more reasons to be playing music that nobody is listening to compared to Spotify. It has fewer. Spotify was configured and regularly playing on home speakers like Sonos long before HomePod was available. And HomePod just went on sale. So the biggest audience of people listening passively to any popular artist should be on Spotify.

    And yet Apple Music is still where most of the traffic driving the world's highest requested volume of streams is coming from.

    In the past, popularity was measured on songs/albums sold not how many time a JD spun the record which was broadcasted over the airways for 100's of miles for anyone to listen to who happen to have the radio turned on and tuned to that station. Back then radio station also paid royalties to spin and play the record. Also Record company use to incentivize radio stations to play a song, why so consumer would go out can buy the album, which record labels made lots of money off each record sold.

    Also I have been steaming music on my house for years, from my one music library, Spotify and Pandora it has nothing to do with having a homepod, and we have passively listen for many years, prior to stream we listen to a radio station also passively listening. In the past when we heard a song we like we bought it and added to the personal library. 

    This is the reason the music industry has fought the whole streaming idea, it does not translate into lots of money for the music distribution markets like it did 20 yrs ago. Keep in mind Spotify is not making money, why playing a song people my not be interested in listening to thus paying the artist fractions of penny for something that was not worth the money.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 64 of 67
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,229member
    avon b7 said:

    What product numbers? None have been given. As I said above, one artist's data is irrelevant and doesn't constitute product numbers but simply Drake numbers.

    Also, as I said before, is it outlandish to think that those subscribers (on both platforms) who weren't streaming Drake, were just streaming something else? Surely what counts - from a platform perspective - is total streams, not if some of your subscribers happen to be listening to the same record at the same time. Beyond simply adding up streams there is nothing interesting here except for Drake (and breaking a streaming record) and no one has been able to offer anything as a way of an argument to support how this is relevant from a platform perspective.

    What counts is subscribers, then active subscribers. Subscriber numbers are important but if they are paying but not using the service you have a problem because at some point they could cancel the subscription. Active subscribers are better as they probably have a reason to keep subscribing and actively using the service.

    Apple wants more subscribers. Spotify wants more subscribers. Why wouldn't they?

    What those subscribers listen too at any given time is moot unless some streams report more profit than others (but do they and what are the details). We don't know. What we know is that individual artist stream tallies are not representative of very much at all.

    And we know that Drake won't be releasing something every week which makes the whole thing even more pointless.


    Sigh. Logic is your weak point, ins't it?

    Your assumption:
    "Also, as I said before, is it outlandish to think that those subscribers (on both platforms) who weren't streaming Drake, were just streaming something else?"

    We could also assume those not streaming Drake were also simply not streaming anything at all. This is about use engagement in the platform. If you had done a small amount of research, you would find this is not an isolated incident. For example, J. Cole had about 2X the number streams on Apple Music compared to Spotify when released. There are almost a dozen of examples like this across different genres of music with the Drake one being the most recent. Across the board, Apple Music seams to be engaging their user base better than Spotify.

    What counts is paying subscribers 
    and user engagement because if you are not engaging your users, they will simply move to the next platform when convenient. The paying customers are paying the bills today and the user engagement levels let you know if you can pay the bills next year.
    tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 65 of 67
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,420member
    gumashow said:
    I am not a prude. I have 10 and 11 year old sons and this is popular music. This Drake music is appalling. Offensive. Every other word is the N word. The F word. How can anyone use this as an example of anything? It’s disgusting. Let me explain, I’m a writer. When you have to use those words every sentence to make your point, you’re a weak storyteller who lacks ANY creativity. It’s lazy wrtitying and says nothing. Zero. Again, I’m not a downer but just cannot believe that this is somehow considered art, or a mainstream anything. I just pulled up Apple Music and it’s highlightedvand as the first thing that comes up. Sad. Truly sad — the state of music. As a parent, I’m offended by anyone, any company, anywhere, who highlights or points to this as something relevant. It’s trash. 
    Listen to Drake’s I’m Upset
    then listen to Genesis’ That’s All

    This is what people are talking about when they decry the state of music these days.  
    I’ll take “Things old white guys say about music” for 800, Alex.
    Best comment!  Lol

    But it’s not just being old that dictates the comparison.  Read again gumashow’s comment. It’s about respect, about being a civilized person, not merely appealing to the lowest common denominator or an audience’s base instincts.  

    For the record, I’m 55, girlfriend is 32.  I suppose she’s old too, as she would switch off Drake in favor of Genesis, in this example. 
    For the record, I guessed you were exactly 55 with the Genesis comment. 32yo women who listen to Genesis are an exceedingly rare bird, so congrats?

    But let’s be real. You want to go back to 2 Live Crew in the 90’s for a minute and come back to talk about Drake’s choice of language? I’m not a big Drake fan, but I do like a lot of his contemporaries, like A$AP Rocky and Kendrick Lamar. You know these people are producing number one albums, right? Drake has won almost 100 awards and has been nominated for nearly 500. Kendrick Lamar just won the Pulitzer for his music and he swears and drops the N word plenty. You know why you don’t get their language? They’re not speaking to you.

    Calling Drake uncivilized is pretty brazen. I’ll leave it at that. 

    You guys sound like the “What’s a Grimes” people in that thread. Or Jim Darymple reviewing Apple Music and complaining about too many hip hops in the new music sections when all he wants to listen to are the same 40 year old AC/DC albums he’s always listened to.
    For the most part, I’d leave the 90s out of it.  Not a great decade.
    Right, okay. Good talk!
  • Reply 66 of 67
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,693member
    steven n. said:
    avon b7 said:

    What product numbers? None have been given. As I said above, one artist's data is irrelevant and doesn't constitute product numbers but simply Drake numbers.

    Also, as I said before, is it outlandish to think that those subscribers (on both platforms) who weren't streaming Drake, were just streaming something else? Surely what counts - from a platform perspective - is total streams, not if some of your subscribers happen to be listening to the same record at the same time. Beyond simply adding up streams there is nothing interesting here except for Drake (and breaking a streaming record) and no one has been able to offer anything as a way of an argument to support how this is relevant from a platform perspective.

    What counts is subscribers, then active subscribers. Subscriber numbers are important but if they are paying but not using the service you have a problem because at some point they could cancel the subscription. Active subscribers are better as they probably have a reason to keep subscribing and actively using the service.

    Apple wants more subscribers. Spotify wants more subscribers. Why wouldn't they?

    What those subscribers listen too at any given time is moot unless some streams report more profit than others (but do they and what are the details). We don't know. What we know is that individual artist stream tallies are not representative of very much at all.

    And we know that Drake won't be releasing something every week which makes the whole thing even more pointless.


    Sigh. Logic is your weak point, ins't it?

    Your assumption:
    "Also, as I said before, is it outlandish to think that those subscribers (on both platforms) who weren't streaming Drake, were just streaming something else?"

    We could also assume those not streaming Drake were also simply not streaming anything at all. This is about use engagement in the platform. If you had done a small amount of research, you would find this is not an isolated incident. For example, J. Cole had about 2X the number streams on Apple Music compared to Spotify when released. There are almost a dozen of examples like this across different genres of music with the Drake one being the most recent. Across the board, Apple Music seams to be engaging their user base better than Spotify.

    What counts is paying subscribers and user engagement because if you are not engaging your users, they will simply move to the next platform when convenient. The paying customers are paying the bills today and the user engagement levels let you know if you can pay the bills next year.
    Perhaps it is me who should sigh.

    Why do you think I wrote this:

    "What counts is subscribers, then active subscribers. Subscriber numbers are important but if they are paying but not using the service you have a problem because at some point they could cancel the subscription. Active subscribers are better as they probably have a reason to keep subscribing and actively using the service."

    Did you read that? Can you see you are rehashing what I've already mentioned? And you quoted it!

    Now for your comments on logic. Did I say they were listening to something else? No

    Did I say they were not listening to something else. No

    I asked if it was reasonable to think they were listening to something else?

    As we only have one tiny snapshot from one release of one artist, it is not possible to know, that's why (or is one of the reasons) the whole thing is pointless (except for Drake of course).




  • Reply 67 of 67
    claire1claire1 Posts: 510unconfirmed, member
    Drake is one of the most famous artists right now. This article is relevant.

    Had this article been about The Rolling Stones or some other artist from the 70s there wouldn't have been much of a fuss.
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