Apple recruits BBC producer Joe Oppenheimer for international video efforts

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
The latest hire for Apple's original video efforts is BBC Films' executive producer Joe Oppenheimer, known for projects like "I, Daniel Blake," "Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa," and "My Scientology Movie."

Louis Theroux in
Louis Theroux in "My Scientology Movie."


Oppenheimer will work in London, reporting to Apple's European creative director, Jay Hunt, Variety said on Tuesday. Hunt joined Apple just last October, coming to the company with high-profile experience at Channel 4 and BBC One.

While not a household name in the U.S., Oppenheimer did receive an Emmy nomination for "One Life," a BBC Films documentary on the lifecycles of animals, narrated by Daniel Craig.

Oppenheimer's production experience dates back to 2002. He has remained almost constantly active for years, some recent work including "On Chesil Beach" starring Saoirse Ronan, and "Victoria & Abdul" with Judi Dench. His IMDb page lists several ongoing projects with his name attached -- among them movies that won't hit screens until 2019.

Apple has its own large slate of original shows coming out that year, possibly as soon as March. Most appear aimed at an American market, such as an adaption of Isaac Asimov's "Foundation," and "Central Park," from the creator of "Bob's Burgers."

Some could have broader appeal though. Recently Apple picked up "Calls," a show from France's Canal+. The company is working on an English-language co-production, but has also acquired rights to the first season of the French program.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 5
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    Filmed entertainment will never be the same after this.  Whenever Apple enters an industry, they disrupt it completely and then siphon up all of the profits.

    Just look at Drake.
  • Reply 2 of 5
    irelandireland Posts: 17,671member
    nunzy said:
    Filmed entertainment will never be the same after this.  Whenever Apple enters an industry, they disrupt it completely and then siphon up all of the profits.

    Just look at Drake.
    Stay humble, dude. Sell your shares; cash in and clear your head.
    edited July 2018 nunzy
  • Reply 3 of 5
    FolioFolio Posts: 639member
    Okay, Apple seems to be getting entertainment down. Why doesn't Tim Cook make a quasi- rival to WGBH, the Boston PBS station that produces science (Nova), nature, and long-form documentaries like Frontline. (Lately, from my sporadic random views, WGBH seems more geared for middle schoolers.) WQED in San Francisco seem comparatively lame. In short, the state of intelligent non-fiction hour-long or half hour shows is rather pathetic for a country as creative and populous as the US. Apple could make a real contribution here. Likewise, Apple could set up studios in each continent to facilitate more of a world view. NHK in Japan for instance does some very interesting non fiction documentaries. All this great tech means you can do nonfiction docs quite economically compared to past.
    jony0
  • Reply 4 of 5
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,171member
    nunzy said:
    Filmed entertainment will never be the same after this.  Whenever Apple enters an industry, they disrupt it completely and then siphon up all of the profits.

    Just look at Drake.
    Eddy, is that you?
    nunzy
  • Reply 5 of 5
    irelandireland Posts: 17,671member
    nunzy said:
    Filmed entertainment will never be the same after this.  Whenever Apple enters an industry, they disrupt it completely and then siphon up all of the profits.

    Just look at Drake.
    Eddy, is that you?
    Give Eddy some credit.
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