Apple won't use Intel's 5G modem in future iPhones [u]

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 26
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,889member
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    It could be that this just means Apple doesn't intend to start supporting 5G in 2020. 

    I'm no expert, but 5G sounds really weird to me for use in a phone. I've read that you basically need line of sight in order for it to work. If anything --- *anything* -- solid comes between your phone and the "tower" (probably not really a tower), then you either lose the signal or it's degraded to the point that you might as well have just stuck with LTE. 


    "Fixed wireless broadband service based on 5G technology will not require line of sight between the transmitter and receiver, said Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam today. Advances in antenna and processing technology have essentially eliminated the need for fixed 5G line of sight, he explained in a question-and-answer session at a financial conference, where he also provided additional detail about Verizon network densification plans to support 5G and other offerings."

    There's also an easy-to-understand tutorial about the whole 5G thing, what it is, what it's for, where you'll find it, and how soon here:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-5g/
    Hmm... your link didn't work, but the Google cache of that page said this:

    "Because 5G’s high frequencies have correspondingly low wavelengths, they have difficulty penetrating solid objects like walls, windows, and even trees."
    Alex1N
  • Reply 22 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,031member
    blastdoor said:
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    It could be that this just means Apple doesn't intend to start supporting 5G in 2020. 

    I'm no expert, but 5G sounds really weird to me for use in a phone. I've read that you basically need line of sight in order for it to work. If anything --- *anything* -- solid comes between your phone and the "tower" (probably not really a tower), then you either lose the signal or it's degraded to the point that you might as well have just stuck with LTE. 


    "Fixed wireless broadband service based on 5G technology will not require line of sight between the transmitter and receiver, said Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam today. Advances in antenna and processing technology have essentially eliminated the need for fixed 5G line of sight, he explained in a question-and-answer session at a financial conference, where he also provided additional detail about Verizon network densification plans to support 5G and other offerings."

    There's also an easy-to-understand tutorial about the whole 5G thing, what it is, what it's for, where you'll find it, and how soon here:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-5g/
    Hmm... your link didn't work, but the Google cache of that page said this:

    "Because 5G’s high frequencies have correspondingly low wavelengths, they have difficulty penetrating solid objects like walls, windows, and even trees."
    I just clicked on it and it worked fine. 

    While your quote from the page is a factual representation, that's it's difficult, it doesn't disprove what Verizon's CEO statement that recent improvements mean line-of-sight is not required now. Both statements can be true.
  • Reply 23 of 26
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,889member
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    It could be that this just means Apple doesn't intend to start supporting 5G in 2020. 

    I'm no expert, but 5G sounds really weird to me for use in a phone. I've read that you basically need line of sight in order for it to work. If anything --- *anything* -- solid comes between your phone and the "tower" (probably not really a tower), then you either lose the signal or it's degraded to the point that you might as well have just stuck with LTE. 


    "Fixed wireless broadband service based on 5G technology will not require line of sight between the transmitter and receiver, said Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam today. Advances in antenna and processing technology have essentially eliminated the need for fixed 5G line of sight, he explained in a question-and-answer session at a financial conference, where he also provided additional detail about Verizon network densification plans to support 5G and other offerings."

    There's also an easy-to-understand tutorial about the whole 5G thing, what it is, what it's for, where you'll find it, and how soon here:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-5g/
    Hmm... your link didn't work, but the Google cache of that page said this:

    "Because 5G’s high frequencies have correspondingly low wavelengths, they have difficulty penetrating solid objects like walls, windows, and even trees."
    I just clicked on it and it worked fine. 

    While your quote from the page is a factual representation, that's it's difficult, it doesn't disprove what Verizon's CEO statement that recent improvements mean line-of-sight is not required now. Both statements can be true.
     And one way for it to be true is to have a very strict interpretation of the word “required“.  Perhaps without line of sight, it will technically work – – in the sense that it doesn’t completely not work.  Perhaps Apple has a higher standard for product performance than Verizon 
  • Reply 24 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,031member
    blastdoor said:
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    It could be that this just means Apple doesn't intend to start supporting 5G in 2020. 

    I'm no expert, but 5G sounds really weird to me for use in a phone. I've read that you basically need line of sight in order for it to work. If anything --- *anything* -- solid comes between your phone and the "tower" (probably not really a tower), then you either lose the signal or it's degraded to the point that you might as well have just stuck with LTE. 


    "Fixed wireless broadband service based on 5G technology will not require line of sight between the transmitter and receiver, said Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam today. Advances in antenna and processing technology have essentially eliminated the need for fixed 5G line of sight, he explained in a question-and-answer session at a financial conference, where he also provided additional detail about Verizon network densification plans to support 5G and other offerings."

    There's also an easy-to-understand tutorial about the whole 5G thing, what it is, what it's for, where you'll find it, and how soon here:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-5g/
    Hmm... your link didn't work, but the Google cache of that page said this:

    "Because 5G’s high frequencies have correspondingly low wavelengths, they have difficulty penetrating solid objects like walls, windows, and even trees."
    I just clicked on it and it worked fine. 

    While your quote from the page is a factual representation, that's it's difficult, it doesn't disprove what Verizon's CEO statement that recent improvements mean line-of-sight is not required now. Both statements can be true.
     And one way for it to be true is to have a very strict interpretation of the word “required“.  Perhaps without line of sight, it will technically work – – in the sense that it doesn’t completely not work.  Perhaps Apple has a higher standard for product performance than Verizon 
    ...and perhaps it will "just work" if it's offered in your neighborhood. I'm actually with ya that I don't think it will replace 4G, instead augment it. Beamforming, MIMO and similar tech has hopes of making an impact on 5G deployment.

    2020 ain't that long to find out where it stands.  
    edited July 2018
  • Reply 25 of 26
    lorrenzlorrenz Posts: 1member
    ksec said:

    ...

    And what is WiGig? That is like a disbanded org since 2011 or 2013? It is now 802.11ad, and I suppose it has nothing got to do with Apple calling off because it is pure garbage spec. It is very likely any development now would be 802.11ay, the successor of 802.11ad, trying to fix and get a properly 60Ghz wireless working. It is still in draft stage and I hope they get it right this time.
    WiGig was an organization (absorbed by Wi-Fi Alliance). 802.11ad is a spec. 802.11ay, the successor of 802.11ad, is a more-or-less straightforward extension of 802.11ad: it supports wider channels and more antennas.

    802.11ad is a decent spec, but mmWave is poor technology for indoor use. Among other challenges, mmWave signals cannot pass through walls. So you'll only get coverage if you're in the same room as your AP. Nevertheless, 5G is renewing interest in mmWave technology. I think we can speculate Apple was interested in 802.11ad/mmWave, because they listed many job openings for mmWave engineers (unless that was an elaborate ruse to throw off the competition).

    I'm guessing they came to the conclusion that mmWave WLAN is still not ready for prime-time. Almost no Wi-Fi APs support it, the signal cannot pass through walls, and most consumers have no use for 4.6 Gbps data rates (most of us have 15-75 Mbps connections to our ISPs).
    edited July 2018 GG1
  • Reply 26 of 26
    Alex1NAlex1N Posts: 37member
    gatorguy said:
    blastdoor said:
    It could be that this just means Apple doesn't intend to start supporting 5G in 2020. 

    I'm no expert, but 5G sounds really weird to me for use in a phone. I've read that you basically need line of sight in order for it to work. If anything --- *anything* -- solid comes between your phone and the "tower" (probably not really a tower), then you either lose the signal or it's degraded to the point that you might as well have just stuck with LTE. 


    "Fixed wireless broadband service based on 5G technology will not require line of sight between the transmitter and receiver, said Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam today. Advances in antenna and processing technology have essentially eliminated the need for fixed 5G line of sight, he explained in a question-and-answer session at a financial conference, where he also provided additional detail about Verizon network densification plans to support 5G and other offerings."

    There's also an easy-to-understand tutorial about the whole 5G thing, what it is, what it's for, where you'll find it, and how soon here:
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-5g/
    That was a very informative and thought-provoking article. Thanks.
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