Apple's incoming 6.5-inch iPhone will offer Plus-style landscape modes

Posted:
in iPhone
The 6.5-inch OLED iPhone expected this fall should support landscape orientation in select native apps, implying that Apple does indeed intend to treat it as a "Plus" version of a 5.8-inch counterpart.

Calendar


Relying on the latest betas of iOS 12 and Xcode, iHelpBR used the latter's iOS Simulator to force iOS to run at 2688x1242 -- the 6.5-inch phone's rumored resolution -- and found that native apps like Mail, Calendar, and Contacts switch from portrait to landscape.

Apple's current 5.8-inch phone, the iPhone X, uses a 2436x1125 display and doesn't support landscape interfaces, despite having a bigger screen than the iPhone 8 Plus.

Messages


Still uncertain is what the company plans to do with its cheaper 6.1-inch LCD iPhone. It will presumably keep landscape mode off the phone in order to steer people towards more expensive hardware -- while the 6.1-inch model may start around $600-700, the 5.8-inch one could hit $800-900, and the 6.5-inch unit $999.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    I don’t understand why the X doesn’t have landscape mode. :/
  • Reply 2 of 12
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    You need the right combination of factors to maximise profits, and Apple nails it every time. It's a web.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,760member
    iPhone X does support landscape mode in some apps. iMessage, calculator, calendar, mail, photos, notes, contacts, Pages, Numbers, Keynote, files and I’m sure others support landscape mode at at least some level. Just need the home pages to support it too. 
    caladanian
  • Reply 4 of 12
    ktappektappe Posts: 753member
    It shouldn't be up to Apple to decide if we want landscape mode. It should be a user preference. 
    avon b7caladanian
  • Reply 5 of 12
    mike1 said:
    iPhone X does support landscape mode in some apps. iMessage, calculator, calendar, mail, photos, notes, contacts, Pages, Numbers, Keynote, files and I’m sure others support landscape mode at at least some level. Just need the home pages to support it too. 

    Unfortunately, you do not get the 3-panel option for Messages and Mail, like how you do on the Plus models. I found that very helpful on the Plus models and hope it comes to whatever is the next phone I buy!
  • Reply 6 of 12
    ktappe said:
    It shouldn't be up to Apple to decide if we want landscape mode. It should be a user preference. 
    I don’t agree at all. I really enjoy that Apple is taking responsibility for the entire usability of their products. I wouldn’t like them to hand us a million settings, and then leave it to us to configure the products’ until we get a useful behavior. Microsoft and Google already apply that philosophy, because they don’t know squat about UX.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 12
    I don’t understand why the X doesn’t have landscape mode. :/
    To make you buy the X Plus. It’s ridiculous, Apple now has everyone buying a $1,000 iPhone EVERY year! Not ridiculous for them, of course. And even with trade up every year, I still don’t see the point. They typically last several years, at least. I don’t know, maybe I’m the only one that sees it as a waste to get rid of a perfectly good phone (or iPad) every year. I miss the $99 Nokias with 2 year contracts 😂 The 8260 was my favorite. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 8 of 12
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,888member
    ktappe said:
    It shouldn't be up to Apple to decide if we want landscape mode. It should be a user preference. 
    I don’t agree at all. I really enjoy that Apple is taking responsibility for the entire usability of their products. I wouldn’t like them to hand us a million settings, and then leave it to us to configure the products’ until we get a useful behavior. Microsoft and Google already apply that philosophy, because they don’t know squat about UX.
    It has little to do with knowledge on UX. Not being able to do something because Apple decided for you is simply a limitation imposed on you.

    You can have a million options to make people more productive and give them flexibility but they don't have to be in your face. All devices have default options and they can be as limited as you like without cutting users off from advanced options.
    caladanian
  • Reply 9 of 12
    Only the flagship 6.5” has landscape mode access!  Nice!  
  • Reply 10 of 12
    airnerdairnerd Posts: 586member
    Cool.

    Now with that said, tell me about how Apple is going to supply the 4.7" market!  I was hoping to be on a new SE2 by now, but that was a big tease.  
    williamlondon
  • Reply 11 of 12
    I don’t understand why the X doesn’t have landscape mode. :/
    The iPhone X didn't support landscape mode as the FaceID didn't support landscape recognition. Rumours are the next versions will support FaceID in portrait and landscape, opening a more seamless landscape mode usage profile.
    caladanian
  • Reply 12 of 12
    avon b7 said:
    ktappe said:
    It shouldn't be up to Apple to decide if we want landscape mode. It should be a user preference. 
    I don’t agree at all. I really enjoy that Apple is taking responsibility for the entire usability of their products. I wouldn’t like them to hand us a million settings, and then leave it to us to configure the products’ until we get a useful behavior. Microsoft and Google already apply that philosophy, because they don’t know squat about UX.
    It has little to do with knowledge on UX. Not being able to do something because Apple decided for you is simply a limitation imposed on you.

    You can have a million options to make people more productive and give them flexibility but they don't have to be in your face. All devices have default options and they can be as limited as you like without cutting users off from advanced options.
    Sorry, but you are wrong here …twice. First, this has everything to do with UX knowledge. Secondly, what you are describing is not the consequence of parameterizing the UI through a bunch of settings. The actual effect that is observed, in real life, is that users believe they are "supposed" to change settings according to their desires. But users most often have no idea of what configuration of UI elements causes their desires, or dislikes. So people start spending time on fiddling, coming up with weird parameter combinations that please no-one. Then they try to compensate for this by adjusting yet other parameters, or requesting new ones from the developer. Time is wasted on unimportant tasks, and in the end usability is plummeting and the user starts complaining about the device. Sure, settings need to be there, but they should be chosen carefully. Real UX designers know this. Entire phone companies have gone down the drain for making such mistakes as you propose, eg Nokia and Sony Ericsson. Apple knew this long before they made their first iPhone, and are masters in this area in my opinion. This is quality. Don't wish for that to change.
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