Verizon includes Apple TV 4K in residential 5G rollout plans

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
Verizon on Tuesday announced it will be including an Apple TV 4K or a YouTube TV subscription with upcoming residential 5G services in an effort to bolster adoption the burgeoning product.

Apple TV 4K


As part of Verizon's offer, customers who sign up for the upcoming service are eligible to receive an Apple TV 4K box or a subscription to YouTube TV as part of the deal. While Verizon does not specify terms and conditions,The Verge reports users will have to choose between Apple's hardware or Google's streaming product.

"Apple TV 4K delivers a stunning cinematic experience at home with support for both 4K and High Dynamic Range (HDR), featuring unbelievably sharp, crisp images, richer, more true-to-life colors, and far greater detail in both dark and bright scenes. Apple TV 4K has been a hit since its debut last fall, offering customers an unmatched selection of 4K HDR movies and TV shows from iTunes, Netflix, and Prime Video," Verizon said in its press release.

Of the big four wireless companies in the U.S., Verizon is angling to be the first to roll out 5G residential broadband, with installations set to begin in the four launch cities later this year. The telco plans to add the speedy tech to its mobile subscription offerings in the first half of 2019.

Verizon on Tuesday also announced a fourth launch market in Indianapolis, which joins previously identified launch cities Houston, Los Angeles and Sacramento.

Today's announcement comes on the heals of another Verizon and Apple promotion. Last week, the company began offering six months of free Apple Music to any customer with an unlimited data plan, regardless if they are a new, existing, or lapsed Apple Music subscriber.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    It would be nice while rolling out an entire new technology, services, speeds, if the telcos would cover smaller and rural areas. I have family and friends who are still stuck with DSL.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 17
    It is pretty doubtful Apple will release a 5G capable iPhone in 2018 or 2019, given Apple's past delayed approach to a variety of new technologies...
  • Reply 3 of 17
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,452member
    GHammer said:
    It would be nice while rolling out an entire new technology, services, speeds, if the telcos would cover smaller and rural areas. I have family and friends who are still stuck with DSL.
    Verizon sold regulators on the fact they would run fiber everywhere if they would allow Verizon to keep upstarts from using the old copper lines for phone. Then about 10 yrs ago VZ made the decisions to only run last mile of fiber into area where the income was well above the median income. They were not interested in serving people who were not willing to pay over $100 a month for tv and internet.

    So do not hold your breath.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 17
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    maestro64 said:
    Verizon sold regulators…
    Sounds like someone needs to be taken to court.
  • Reply 5 of 17
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,552member
    TELSTRA has drawn first blood in the battle between Aussie telcos to roll out the next generation of mobile technology. 

    The company announced today it had switched on 5G technology across selected areas of the Gold Coast, making it one of the first in the world to do so.

    Telstra CEO Andy Penn said the company plans to have more than 200 5G-capable sites up and running around the country by the end of 2018.


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 17
    ajmasajmas Posts: 554member
    It is pretty doubtful Apple will release a 5G capable iPhone in 2018 or 2019, given Apple's past delayed approach to a variety of new technologies...
    If history is to go by, then they will do so when both the chips can be had in large enough quantities and when the chips are at a certain power draw. Two things that were issues in the original 4G chips apple used were: not supporting all variations of 4G is across the globe; being too power hungry. 

    It is sometimes better to be late to the game, but with a solution that is better thought out than everyone who has gone before. 2019 in this case sounds like a reasonable release date for 5G on iPhone. 
    davgregredgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,841member
    GHammer said:
    It would be nice while rolling out an entire new technology, services, speeds, if the telcos would cover smaller and rural areas. I have family and friends who are still stuck with DSL.
    That was an Obama era initiative.   It's dead now.   There's no profit in building a tower or running a cable for every household.

    Originally the cable operators were all local monopolies -- like gas or electric companies -- and tightly regulated to insure quality service at reasonable prices.  Now, it's all about profit.  They will only serve those who they can profit from.
    watto_cobrakingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 8 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,841member
    I find Verizon's selection of cities for 5G to be interesting.  I'm not familiar with Sacramento, but the rest are all fairly flat cities.  

    While most write-ups of 5G focus exclusively on its speed, I think I also read in one a comment that the signal does not go far and is easily interrupted.  So, if true, does that meant that more hilly/mountanous cities will have to wait for 5G because it takes more towers & expense to build there?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 17
    davgregdavgreg Posts: 248member

    While most write-ups of 5G focus exclusively on its speed, I think I also read in one a comment that the signal does not go far and is easily interrupted. 
    The behavior of the signal depends upon the frequency band. T-Mobile claims it landed the most desirable spectrum in the auctions.
    We will see soon enough.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 17
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,998member
    I find Verizon's selection of cities for 5G to be interesting.  I'm not familiar with Sacramento, but the rest are all fairly flat cities.  

    While most write-ups of 5G focus exclusively on its speed, I think I also read in one a comment that the signal does not go far and is easily interrupted.  So, if true, does that meant that more hilly/mountanous cities will have to wait for 5G because it takes more towers & expense to build there?
    Sounds likely to me based on what I've read, which granted isn't a lot. 
    edited August 2018
  • Reply 11 of 17
    YP101YP101 Posts: 52member
    I guess Verizon jumped in band wagon because T-mobile.
    T-Mobile will start 5G brodband home internet which bypass electric pole laying down fiber or copper line to do internet service business.

    I think Google will start this as well soon.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 12 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,841member
    YP101 said:
    I guess Verizon jumped in band wagon because T-mobile.
    T-Mobile will start 5G brodband home internet which bypass electric pole laying down fiber or copper line to do internet service business.

    I think Google will start this as well soon.
    Now THAT's a true game changer.

    And, it explains the rush to streaming, subscription TV services away from old style 300 channel cable TV.

    Anybody care to predict what things will look like in about 10 years?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 17
    davendaven Posts: 495member
    Cable and cell phones brought down landlines and 5G will bring down satellite and cable. The last mile is the most expensive part of a system and 5G has a lot of advantages over hardwired and satellite systems. It would be interesting to see a 5G enabled AppleTV that can act as your source for TV and internet.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 17
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,998member
    daven said:
    Cable and cell phones brought down landlines and 5G will bring down satellite and cable. The last mile is the most expensive part of a system and 5G has a lot of advantages over hardwired and satellite systems. It would be interesting to see a 5G enabled AppleTV that can act as your source for TV and internet.
    We're still migrating right back to the standard cable model for media tho. Cord-cutting isn't changing things all that much. Figure up the content most of us want: Sports, movies, kid's stuff if you have 'em, a couple of favorite stations like cooking or scifi, some local stations over antenna if necessary and some rudimentary DVR-like function and as I saw it described in a cord-cutting article "paying $70 to quit cable feels like smoking a pack of Parliaments to quit Marlboro Lights."

    I'm pretty much a cord-cutter, but it's not because the quality of programming is all that better, or the quality of the stream itself is better than wired cable (it's not) or that I'm really even saving any money to speak of. So then why am I still committed to keeping the cord cut? I'm not sure and my wife is getting closer to convincing me to fuggedaboudit . 

    For $100 a month I'd get basic cable plus HBO plus 150GB internet. Paying just shy of $60 now for internet alone. I'd still have a buncha free Roku channels and YouTube. Add in Netflix and it sure does seem like a sensical plan.  
    :/
    edited August 2018
  • Reply 15 of 17
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,132member
    I find Verizon's selection of cities for 5G to be interesting.  I'm not familiar with Sacramento, but the rest are all fairly flat cities.  

    While most write-ups of 5G focus exclusively on its speed, I think I also read in one a comment that the signal does not go far and is easily interrupted.  So, if true, does that meant that more hilly/mountanous cities will have to wait for 5G because it takes more towers & expense to build there?
    Sacramento is in a valley, so it's flat. That is true regarding 5G, but I did read carriers will be using a lower frequency spectrum to help with the range issue. It sounds like they are going to use a combination of millimeter wave (high frequency) and sub 6Hz spectrum. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 16 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,841member
    daven said:
    Cable and cell phones brought down landlines and 5G will bring down satellite and cable. The last mile is the most expensive part of a system and 5G has a lot of advantages over hardwired and satellite systems. It would be interesting to see a 5G enabled AppleTV that can act as your source for TV and internet.
    Rolling out electric and copper phone lines government got involved and, while they granted one company a monopoly they insured that that company received a fair return and the consumers paid a fair price.   The same thing happened with the roll out of cable in most areas.

    Both roll outs were orderly and efficiently and everybody was well served.

    In today's climate I doubt that will happen.   We'll get 3 towers from 3 different companies in one spot while vast other areas (especially sparsely populated areas) get zero.  Not good.
  • Reply 17 of 17
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,452member
    maestro64 said:
    Verizon sold regulators…
    Sounds like someone needs to be taken to court.

    yeah, but the regulators do not care now they are onto other things and very few people use copper for phones. VZ is very good to point out the squirrel to the regulator dogs to chase.
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