IKEA expanding HomeKit lineup with new smart plugs in October

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 2019
IKEA will be building on its popular and affordable smart home platform this fall with a new HomeKit-equipped smart plug, according to new rumors.

IKEA HomeKit Smart Plug
Source: Teknikveckan


Swedish tech blog Teknikveckan this week received information regarding an as-yet-unreleased TRDFRI smart plug expected to ship in October.

According to a screenshot of what appears to be IKEA's internal product database, the smart plug is set to arrive in October and will run only $10 for basic on/off functionality. A bundle including the outlet and a remote will cost $15. The remote features a magnetic back design for mounting with the included wall bracket, similar to the Hue Dimmer Switch.

The smart plug depicted in the image looks to accommodate Europlug Type F outlets, one of two electrical outlet types used throughout Sweden. Whether IKEA plans to release an identical device supporting Type A or Type B outlets found in the U.S. is unknown.

TRDFRI is IKEA's line of smart home products, primarily consisting of smart light bulbs, that come with support for Apple's HomeKit, Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa.

Reviews have not been overwhelmingly positive for the TRDFRI line, with many reviewers citing inconsistent command responses. They do however remain one of the most affordable lineups of HomeKit products available.

As with existing TRDFRI products, the rumored smart plug will likely require a dedicated gateway to function.

IKEA has had a bumpy road with its smart home line. The company initially announced HomeKit support as part of a software update last August, only to retract those claims hours later. A second release was attempted last October, but the update was pulled after "technical difficulties" were encountered. IKEA officially added HomeKit support to the TRDFRI line in November.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    KRÅPØLA
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 18
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,337member
    nunzy said:
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
    What about Apple’s profit?
    nunzy
  • Reply 4 of 18
    nunzy said:
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
    I have them throughout my home, they integrate seamlessly with HomeKit, work like a charm, and are affordable. Where’s the loss? That Apple snobbery really has to stop guys.
    caladaniansvanstromcincyteenunzyasdasdpropodelijahg
  • Reply 5 of 18
    bonobobbonobob Posts: 308member
    If they require their own hub, they aren't really HomeKit compatible as far as I am concerned.  The whole point for me is that my Apple TV is the only hub I need.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 18
    bonobob said:
    If they require their own hub, they aren't really HomeKit compatible as far as I am concerned.  The whole point for me is that my Apple TV is the only hub I need.
    They use the same protocol as the Philips Hue systems (ZigBee v3). You'd need to flip the lights on and off 6 times, and then the bulbs reset so they can be found by the Philips bridge app.  I had planned on using them in my apartment but the ceiling mount bulbs (GU10) that would replace the halogens actually have a diameter a few mm too broad - 52-53mm or so, not 50mm, so they don't fit into the installed light cans...dead shame too; I'd have been very happy to use them (and I need about 30 to outfit the apartment)
  • Reply 7 of 18
    nunzy said:
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
    I have them throughout my home, they integrate seamlessly with HomeKit, work like a charm, and are affordable. Where’s the loss? That Apple snobbery really has to stop guys.

    You'll have to excuse Nunzy. He's a peculiar kind of Apple fan/ troll.
    nunzyasdasdwatto_cobraelijahg
  • Reply 8 of 18
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 375member
    I visited IKEA, after a giving them a miss for about 7 years, and walked away with a bedroom wardrobe.  I forgot just what low quality crap they flog.  I nearly carted the POS out to the back lawn and annihilated it with a chain saw.  Apple and their products don't even come into the equation ... it will be 700 years before I give IKEA my custom again.

    edited August 2018 nunzywatto_cobraelijahg
  • Reply 9 of 18
    nunzy said:
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
    I have them throughout my home, they integrate seamlessly with HomeKit, work like a charm, and are affordable. Where’s the loss? That Apple snobbery really has to stop guys.
    Same here. I have about a dozen of their Trådfri lightbulbs; and I've had zero problems. And, I've saved money.

    An important argument for using IKEAs products is also that once you have an IKEA in your neighbourhood you know that you can keep on buying compatible products. There'll be no lines of products that are just retired, or lights from 5 sources that all have a slightly different hue to them no matter how much you finetune everything.
    elijahg
  • Reply 10 of 18
    kimberly said:
    I visited IKEA, after a giving them a miss for about 7 years, and walked away with a bedroom wardrobe.  I forgot just what low quality crap they flog.  I nearly carted the POS out to the back lawn and annihilated it with a chain saw.  Apple and their products don't even come into the equation ... it will be 700 years before I give IKEA my custom again.

    You literally had the product in front of you to touch and check to make sure it was what you wanted, and yet it's IKEA fault for selling it to you?

    That's the same bs that you get from people that complain about how that one iPhone they had years ago didn't have certain features… It's actually quite simple: If a product doesn't meet your requirements, then you don't buy it.
    propodwatto_cobraelijahg
  • Reply 11 of 18
    bonobob said:
    If they require their own hub, they aren't really HomeKit compatible as far as I am concerned.  The whole point for me is that my Apple TV is the only hub I need.
    The fact that they're certified to have the HomeKit SDK would suggest otherwise, I don't see the issue here as IKEA use the Zigbee standard which is leaps and bounds over WiFi and Bluetooth, also you can use HomeKit devices without an AppleTV....you just can't use them remotely.
    elijahg
  • Reply 12 of 18
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 363member
    When are you guys doing a comprehensive review of the IKEA HomeKit and Qi devices?

    I’ve checked some reviews on YouTube and they most people say they are very unreliable and low quality, but people over here seem to have a good opinion about them. 
  • Reply 13 of 18
    CelTanCelTan Posts: 46member
    First I am a heavy apple user - 2 desktops and 2 laptops plus iPad/phone/watch. 

    And I like IKEA - their kallax series is the base of rectangles in my livingroom and office. 

    I have hue lights and added Ikea ones. The white ones from Ikea are brighter overall than Philips hue and I find their button design superior to Philips. 

    Maybe they break quicker... but then it’s a third of the cost to replace them... who knows at this time - only a few years of use will show. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 18
    williamhwilliamh Posts: 803member
    gutengel said:
    When are you guys doing a comprehensive review of the IKEA HomeKit and Qi devices?
    Not comprehensive:  the Qi charger works just fine with my iPhone 8. I bought one that embeds in a table.  IKEA sold the charger for about $15 and the hole saw for $5.  Bargain!

    I know, eventually Apple will sell a better one for 6x more.  IKEA also has models that stand alone and charge multiple devices for a bit more. 
    edited August 2018 propodelijahg
  • Reply 15 of 18
    gutengel said:
    When are you guys doing a comprehensive review of the IKEA HomeKit and Qi devices?

    I’ve checked some reviews on YouTube and they most people say they are very unreliable and low quality, but people over here seem to have a good opinion about them. 
    I just remembered that in the past year I've actually had one problem…

    Last winter when temperature for the first time dropped to like -15°C, my porch light broke; but as it's rated for -20°C I got a new one, no questions asked.
    watto_cobraelijahg
  • Reply 16 of 18
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,670member
    nunzy said:
    Apple customers don't usually buy downscale junk like Ikea. Android users are more their ilk.
    This is a plug. I have pretty damed expensive furniture in my house, not all of my choice, but I will buy the cheapest working homekit enabled plug. 


    gutengelsvanstromelijahgtokyojimu
  • Reply 17 of 18
    svanstrom said:
    You literally had the product in front of you to touch and check to make sure it was what you wanted, and yet it's IKEA fault for selling it to you?

    That's the same bs that you get from people that complain about how that one iPhone they had years ago didn't have certain features… It's actually quite simple: If a product doesn't meet your requirements, then you don't buy it.
    The back of the wardrobe in the flat pack was actually 3 lengths of thin compressed cardboard joined with masking tape so it could be folded over.  As soon as it was lifted out of the flat pack, the masking tape joins ripped.  How is one supposed to see THAT in the store d***head.  Google "ikea crap" as long as you have a 1000 years to read all the hits.  Meatballs ... I think I'm going to be physically ill.  @svanstrom <- you wouldn't be SVWEEEDISH would you?
    edited August 2018
  • Reply 18 of 18
    kimberly said:
    svanstrom said:
    You literally had the product in front of you to touch and check to make sure it was what you wanted, and yet it's IKEA fault for selling it to you?

    That's the same bs that you get from people that complain about how that one iPhone they had years ago didn't have certain features… It's actually quite simple: If a product doesn't meet your requirements, then you don't buy it.
    The back of the wardrobe in the flat pack was actually 3 lengths of thin compressed cardboard joined with masking tape so it could be folded over.  As soon as it was lifted out of the flat pack, the masking tape joins ripped.  How is one supposed to see THAT in the store d***head.  Google "ikea crap" as long as you have a 1000 years to read all the hits.  Meatballs ... I think I'm going to be physically ill.  @svanstrom <- you wouldn't be SVWEEEDISH would you?
    Your spontaneous reaction to someone being from another country is to question their motives for saying something, and making fun of their accent when using a second language? That's very 'murican of you.

    You bought a very affordable flatpack and literally broke it yourself by not looking at what you had before handling it… Aaaand… that makes it IKEAs fault?
    elijahg
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