John Hancock expands Apple Watch health data monitoring program to all life insurance poli...

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,766member

    melgross said:
    It’s the way things are going. What some are concerned about is how all of this information will be used. Will they raise rates because your readings aren’t good enough? It’s tough to tell, but eventually, there will be legislation stating what they can do with this data, and what they can’t.
    Evidence of Insurability is nothing new but usually it is only used if you request more than the default amount of coverage or your age is greater than XX (varies by provider). Normally you answer a few health related questions when you apply for the policy, but unless you have indicated you have health issues, after that, usually no additional medical data is required.

    The purpose of requiring the Watch is simply to inspire you to live a healthier life.
    edited September 2018
  • Reply 22 of 40
    melgross said:

    I'm dubious since I sometimes get my Stand in for the hour by hanging arm to side of armrest and swing it to and fro.
    The only one you’re fooling is yourself. You should just turn it off then.
    Well, he is also fooling those companies that award perks for a certain amount of "exercise" performed every month. 
  • Reply 23 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
  • Reply 24 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    volcan said:

    melgross said:
    It’s the way things are going. What some are concerned about is how all of this information will be used. Will they raise rates because your readings aren’t good enough? It’s tough to tell, but eventually, there will be legislation stating what they can do with this data, and what they can’t.
    Evidence of Insurability is nothing new but usually it is only used if you request more than the default amount of coverage or your age is greater than XX (varies by provider). Normally you answer a few health related questions when you apply for the policy, but unless you have indicated you have health issues, after that, usually no additional medical data is required.

    The purpose of requiring the Watch is simply to inspire you to live a healthier life.
    The requirement is to lower the costs of the insurance company. If you’re healthier, or find out about a serious problem before it becomes critical, then their costs are lowered.

    my situation was found out by my watch when it was just forming. I got treatment as a result, and likely saved the company a lot of money.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member

    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:

    I'm dubious since I sometimes get my Stand in for the hour by hanging arm to side of armrest and swing it to and fro.
    The only one you’re fooling is yourself. You should just turn it off then.
    Well, he is also fooling those companies that award perks for a certain amount of "exercise" performed every month. 
    Maybe, but if the watch doesn’t catch a real problem because of what he’s doing, the laugh will be on him. Remember that stupidity is its own reward.
  • Reply 26 of 40
    volcan said:
    Venerable health insurance company John Hancock is pivoting towards "interactive life insurance," with the provider now requiring all policy holders to track their fitness with wearables and apps. 
    As far as I know John Hancock does not offer health insurance
    https://www.johnhancockinsurance.com/vitality-program.html

    I thought the other guy's sentence was hilarious "Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving?"

    The company (now owned by Canadian insurer Manulife) was named for John Handcock of the stylish signature on the declaration of independence. He died in 1873
  • Reply 27 of 40
    melgross said:

    I'm dubious since I sometimes get my Stand in for the hour by hanging arm to side of armrest and swing it to and fro.
    The only one you’re fooling is yourself. You should just turn it off then.
    Well, my resting BPM is lower than 73% of Cardiogram users, stand of 14 higher than 90%, move of 527 higher than 90%, exercise of 67 (that sounds crazy) higher than 84%, and steps of 8,295 higher than 91%.

    I rarely pull the arm-swinging stunt. However, when I'm on deadline, and I stood a minute before the hour, and am planning to stand a few minutes after the beginning of the following hour of sitting, it's irritating to miss out by five minutes. So, I may be fooling myself (and the inanimate object on my wrist!) but only about once every other week.
    edited September 2018
  • Reply 28 of 40
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
  • Reply 29 of 40
    nunzy said:
    Phil is making Apple rich!
     My theory that Nunzy is Phil confirmed. 
    king editor the gratenunzywatto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 40
    The AI headline is wrong. They aren’t requiring it, they’re requiring all new policies have the Vitality program as an option for discounted premiums. major error.

    NPR reported it correctly. Clicking the source link also cites that it’s the program that is being added, not the requirement to use it. 
    edited September 2018 larz2112SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 40
    claire1claire1 Posts: 494unconfirmed, member
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yeah I thought it was the other way around. A discount not an increase. 
  • Reply 32 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    melgross said:

    I'm dubious since I sometimes get my Stand in for the hour by hanging arm to side of armrest and swing it to and fro.
    The only one you’re fooling is yourself. You should just turn it off then.
    Well, my resting BPM is lower than 73% of Cardiogram users, stand of 14 higher than 90%, move of 527 higher than 90%, exercise of 67 (that sounds crazy) higher than 84%, and steps of 8,295 higher than 91%.

    I rarely pull the arm-swinging stunt. However, when I'm on deadline, and I stood a minute before the hour, and am planning to stand a few minutes after the beginning of the following hour of sitting, it's irritating to miss out by five minutes. So, I may be fooling myself (and the inanimate object on my wrist!) but only about once every other week.
    I never had the slightest problem, and have had, at 68, very high readings in those areas too - until I didn’t. You don’t know what may happen until it does, no matter how unexpected it may be. 
    edited September 2018
  • Reply 33 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
    So, get him to do some excercise, then the premiums will be the same. You know, when there are changeovers, some people will always be caught in the cracks. It’s too bad for them, but the concept is for the long term, so for those that are unhappy now, many more will benefit from. That’s what matters.

    in using the watch, there isn’t much you have to do. Heart rate is automatic. You can easily set it up for him.
  • Reply 34 of 40
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
    So, get him to do some excercise, then the premiums will be the same. You know, when there are changeovers, some people will always be caught in the cracks. It’s too bad for them, but the concept is for the long term, so for those that are unhappy now, many more will benefit from. That’s what matters.

    in using the watch, there isn’t much you have to do. Heart rate is automatic. You can easily set it up for him.
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
    So, get him to do some excercise, then the premiums will be the same. You know, when there are changeovers, some people will always be caught in the cracks. It’s too bad for them, but the concept is for the long term, so for those that are unhappy now, many more will benefit from. That’s what matters.

    in using the watch, there isn’t much you have to do. Heart rate is automatic. You can easily set it up for him.
    My original point is obvious lost on you, and I will have to expend more time and energy to explain it to you than should be necessary, as I often have to do with my 82-year-old father (which was my original point). My father does physical therapy three times a week and goes for walks outside of his assisted living facility several times a week. The exercise part of the equation is not the problem. The problem is trying to explain a new policy to my dad, and also a new tech gadget that he will not understand. And my dad is the type of person who used to read the user manual from cover to cover before using anything before his eyesight got very bad. Also, as is the case with many elderly people, a change and/or disruption to what my dad is used to doing to a BIG deal and causes him stress and anxiety. In this case, undue stress and anxiety.

    Luckily StrangeDays posted: "The AI headline is wrong. They aren’t requiring it, they’re requiring all new policies have the Vitality program as an option for discounted premiums. major error. NPR reported it correctly. Clicking the source link also cites that it’s the program that is being added, not the requirement to use it. "

    This will make things much less stressful on my father and save me hours of explaining. Thanks for the info StrangeDays!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
    So, get him to do some excercise, then the premiums will be the same. You know, when there are changeovers, some people will always be caught in the cracks. It’s too bad for them, but the concept is for the long term, so for those that are unhappy now, many more will benefit from. That’s what matters.

    in using the watch, there isn’t much you have to do. Heart rate is automatic. You can easily set it up for him.
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    melgross said:
    larz2112 said:
    My 82-year-old father is going to LOVE hearing that his premium may go up unless he buys a device that he doesn't understand and remembers to earn enough "Vitality Points"  every month. To him, a watch tells time, period. He's had a smart phone for 2-3 years that he never uses because he forgets how to use it and due to his poor eyesight, the tiny screen is very difficult for him to read. I can just see the hours of conversation I will soon be having with my father.

    DAD: "A what?" ME: "They are called "Vitality Points" dad." DAD: "I don't understand. What is that?" ME: "They are points that you earn for exercising." DAD: "Points for what?" ME: "Well, in your case the points will reduce your premium." DAD: "So now I have to keep track of points?!" ME: "No, the Apple Watch will keep track of your points." DAD: "What? How is a watch going to do that?"  etc., etc., for hours.

    Thank you John Hancock.
    It’s a discount for getting one, and using it. New policies will be required to get one.
    Yes, I understand that. What is your point? According to the article, ALL policies will be coverted to Vitality policies in 2019. My father will have no choice. And reductions in premiums are available if you execise (read between the lines: we will be raising the premiums for those who don't choose to exercise). 

    "All current John Hancock policies will convert to Vitality policies in 2019.  Policy holders can reduce their premiums and also earn gift cards and other product rewards, if they exercise regularly, as shown by their wearable device. This model of "interactive life insurance" was first offered by John Hancock in 2015, and will now apply to all of the company's life insurance policies. "

    This means at some point my father will get wind that his policy is changing and will ask me to explain, which will take hours, and he will probably never completely understand what it is all about. Then he will call John Hancock himself and waste hours on the phone peppering them with questions and trying to get them to clearly explain the details of the new "Vitality policy" to him. All of this will generate a lot of addtional anxiety and stress for my 82-year-old father. Again, thank you John Hancock.
    So, get him to do some excercise, then the premiums will be the same. You know, when there are changeovers, some people will always be caught in the cracks. It’s too bad for them, but the concept is for the long term, so for those that are unhappy now, many more will benefit from. That’s what matters.

    in using the watch, there isn’t much you have to do. Heart rate is automatic. You can easily set it up for him.
    My original point is obvious lost on you, and I will have to expend more time and energy to explain it to you than should be necessary, as I often have to do with my 82-year-old father (which was my original point). My father does physical therapy three times a week and goes for walks outside of his assisted living facility several times a week. The exercise part of the equation is not the problem. The problem is trying to explain a new policy to my dad, and also a new tech gadget that he will not understand. And my dad is the type of person who used to read the user manual from cover to cover before using anything before his eyesight got very bad. Also, as is the case with many elderly people, a change and/or disruption to what my dad is used to doing to a BIG deal and causes him stress and anxiety. In this case, undue stress and anxiety.

    Luckily StrangeDays posted: "The AI headline is wrong. They aren’t requiring it, they’re requiring all new policies have the Vitality program as an option for discounted premiums. major error. NPR reported it correctly. Clicking the source link also cites that it’s the program that is being added, not the requirement to use it. "

    This will make things much less stressful on my father and save me hours of explaining. Thanks for the info StrangeDays!
    What he said is also what I said, if you read my other posts.
  • Reply 36 of 40
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    Yest another loser in the business. Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving? So no many of us will not wear some funky device because health insurance had this idea. It is convenience - not regulatory part... and watch when regulators and auithorities try that demand and stop it. They just start building case against them. We have diffeent levels of activity. When you seat in race car on track for your own pleasure the blood pressure and pulse is so hight that would blow up that iWatch probably as it is designed for lightweiight workout comparing to real endurance/stress/adrenaline sports thats some of us perform. If you are targetting coach potato with insurance then go ahead. I can see how that person will execute some healt taking orders prescribed by insurance company. That is going to be interesting. Good luck John Hancock.
    This is one of the largest life insurers. It has nothing to do with regulation. There is no doubt that eventually, all life insurers will require this.
    Just like all vehicle insurance companies will eventually require autonomous systems or the vehicle will be considered too risky.
    It’s the way things are going. What some are concerned about is how all of this information will be used. Will they raise rates because your readings aren’t good enough? It’s tough to tell, but eventually, there will be legislation stating what they can do with this data, and what they can’t.
    It may be the way things are going, but that's not necessarily a good thing.  Looking at where these trends will take us in the future is very unsettling.

    First, you can opt into [surveillance technique of the month], just for fun.  Points/recognition.
    Next, you can opt into [surveillance technique of the month] to get a $discount.
    Next, you must opt into [surveillance technique of the month] in order not to pay a premium
    Next, you must opt into [surveillance technique of the month] or you can't get [whatever service].
    Finally, companies lobby until lawmakers require that [surveillance technique of the month] is now required by law.

    People seem to care a lot about their vehicles being tracked around, and yet they carry mobile tracking devices (smartphones) every day.  Medical and health data is among the most personal and private data that human individuals own.  There are many laws that (in theory) protect this data from being sold, published, distributed, etc. because our society says that's not okay.

    So now we have these new whiz-bang clever devices that can help people monitor their health.  In general that's a Good Thing.  But that information should be available ONLY to the user and potentially to their medical providers.  I'm actually a little surprised this isn't getting legal pushback, though it may still happen.  Personally, I'll go without insurance before I let my insurance company tap into my daily activity, routines, sleep habits, etc.  Eventually they'll want to know where you go, what you eat, what you buy, who you associate with, and if they don't deem all the results to be in their best interest, then your rates will go up as well.  This stuff is not okay, regardless of their financial interest.

    If people don't fight these things now when they're first taking hold, then we're all screwed.  Surveillance capitalism wins, humanity loses.

  • Reply 37 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    blah64 said:
    melgross said:
    melgross said:
    Yest another loser in the business. Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving? So no many of us will not wear some funky device because health insurance had this idea. It is convenience - not regulatory part... and watch when regulators and auithorities try that demand and stop it. They just start building case against them. We have diffeent levels of activity. When you seat in race car on track for your own pleasure the blood pressure and pulse is so hight that would blow up that iWatch probably as it is designed for lightweiight workout comparing to real endurance/stress/adrenaline sports thats some of us perform. If you are targetting coach potato with insurance then go ahead. I can see how that person will execute some healt taking orders prescribed by insurance company. That is going to be interesting. Good luck John Hancock.
    This is one of the largest life insurers. It has nothing to do with regulation. There is no doubt that eventually, all life insurers will require this.
    Just like all vehicle insurance companies will eventually require autonomous systems or the vehicle will be considered too risky.
    It’s the way things are going. What some are concerned about is how all of this information will be used. Will they raise rates because your readings aren’t good enough? It’s tough to tell, but eventually, there will be legislation stating what they can do with this data, and what they can’t.
    It may be the way things are going, but that's not necessarily a good thing.  Looking at where these trends will take us in the future is very unsettling.

    First, you can opt into [surveillance technique of the month], just for fun.  Points/recognition.
    Next, you can opt into [surveillance technique of the month] to get a $discount.
    Next, you must opt into [surveillance technique of the month] in order not to pay a premium
    Next, you must opt into [surveillance technique of the month] or you can't get [whatever service].
    Finally, companies lobby until lawmakers require that [surveillance technique of the month] is now required by law.

    People seem to care a lot about their vehicles being tracked around, and yet they carry mobile tracking devices (smartphones) every day.  Medical and health data is among the most personal and private data that human individuals own.  There are many laws that (in theory) protect this data from being sold, published, distributed, etc. because our society says that's not okay.

    So now we have these new whiz-bang clever devices that can help people monitor their health.  In general that's a Good Thing.  But that information should be available ONLY to the user and potentially to their medical providers.  I'm actually a little surprised this isn't getting legal pushback, though it may still happen.  Personally, I'll go without insurance before I let my insurance company tap into my daily activity, routines, sleep habits, etc.  Eventually they'll want to know where you go, what you eat, what you buy, who you associate with, and if they don't deem all the results to be in their best interest, then your rates will go up as well.  This stuff is not okay, regardless of their financial interest.

    If people don't fight these things now when they're first taking hold, then we're all screwed.  Surveillance capitalism wins, humanity loses.

    It may be good, and it may be bad, depends on how it’s used. But it’s coming either way, and that was the point I was making. Seceral insurance companies have been offering awatches at a discount for a couple of years for employees as well as “customers”. That trend will continue, until, if proven helpful, it will be required for everyone.

    and guess what, people won’t have to like it.
  • Reply 38 of 40
    melgross said:
    Yest another loser in the business. Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving? So no many of us will not wear some funky device because health insurance had this idea. It is convenience - not regulatory part... and watch when regulators and auithorities try that demand and stop it. They just start building case against them. We have diffeent levels of activity. When you seat in race car on track for your own pleasure the blood pressure and pulse is so hight that would blow up that iWatch probably as it is designed for lightweiight workout comparing to real endurance/stress/adrenaline sports thats some of us perform. If you are targetting coach potato with insurance then go ahead. I can see how that person will execute some healt taking orders prescribed by insurance company. That is going to be interesting. Good luck John Hancock.
    This is one of the largest life insurers. It has nothing to do with regulation. There is no doubt that eventually, all life insurers will require this.
    Just like all vehicle insurance companies will eventually require autonomous systems or the vehicle will be considered too risky.
    No, the insurance companies won't "require" them. The actuaries will simply calculate the lessor risk of the new safety features and will offer much lower premiums if you have them. If the insurance premiums are cut in half (because your risks are cut in half) for vehicles with autonomous systems consumers themselves will decide where to put their hard earned dollars.
  • Reply 39 of 40
    nhtnht Posts: 4,402member
    Yest another loser in the business. Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving? So no many of us will not wear some funky device because health insurance had this idea. It is convenience - not regulatory part... and watch when regulators and auithorities try that demand and stop it. They just start building case against them. We have diffeent levels of activity. When you seat in race car on track for your own pleasure the blood pressure and pulse is so hight that would blow up that iWatch probably as it is designed for lightweiight workout comparing to real endurance/stress/adrenaline sports thats some of us perform. If you are targetting coach potato with insurance then go ahead. I can see how that person will execute some healt taking orders prescribed by insurance company. That is going to be interesting. Good luck John Hancock.
    iWatch? Not able to handle the "real" sports that you perform? Oh, do tell....

    Myself, I lift heavy weights 4 days a week, plus HIIT and LISS cardio and it keeps up just fine. 
    Actually, I noticed that my watch did ask if I was okay while on a track because my heart rate pegged without any obvious physical exertion.  That the car was moving fast even on a mildly twisty course wasn’t enough to make it think I wasn’t seated.

    Kinda funny as hell when it happened...
    are you having too much fun or a heart attack?  Siri can’t tell.

    One work out I didn’t find on my watch and occasionally wish it had was heavy bag.  Not enough of a big deal to even look up if I could add new named workouts...

    I’m sure my insurance company would want to know if I still raced and the watch could tell them that.  It only happened once that day and I haven’t been in a track since.  Kinda miss it but don’t miss paying for tires and brakes...
  • Reply 40 of 40
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,409member
    nht said:
    Yest another loser in the business. Does he know what happend to few car renting companies when they tried tracking car and technique of driving? So no many of us will not wear some funky device because health insurance had this idea. It is convenience - not regulatory part... and watch when regulators and auithorities try that demand and stop it. They just start building case against them. We have diffeent levels of activity. When you seat in race car on track for your own pleasure the blood pressure and pulse is so hight that would blow up that iWatch probably as it is designed for lightweiight workout comparing to real endurance/stress/adrenaline sports thats some of us perform. If you are targetting coach potato with insurance then go ahead. I can see how that person will execute some healt taking orders prescribed by insurance company. That is going to be interesting. Good luck John Hancock.
    iWatch? Not able to handle the "real" sports that you perform? Oh, do tell....

    Myself, I lift heavy weights 4 days a week, plus HIIT and LISS cardio and it keeps up just fine. 
    Actually, I noticed that my watch did ask if I was okay while on a track because my heart rate pegged without any obvious physical exertion.  That the car was moving fast even on a mildly twisty course wasn’t enough to make it think I wasn’t seated.

    Kinda funny as hell when it happened...
    are you having too much fun or a heart attack?  Siri can’t tell.

    One work out I didn’t find on my watch and occasionally wish it had was heavy bag.  Not enough of a big deal to even look up if I could add new named workouts...

    I’m sure my insurance company would want to know if I still raced and the watch could tell them that.  It only happened once that day and I haven’t been in a track since.  Kinda miss it but don’t miss paying for tires and brakes...
    When I had my problem, while sitting on my couch and reading, I took several minutes to check the readings by putting it on continuous. That way a one time number wasn’t giving me a false reading. If your heart jumps when on a roller coaster, I imagine it would be understood by the user that that’s why. Check it again while on the ground, or after you stop driving.
Sign In or Register to comment.