Photo shootout -- Comparing the iPhone XS Max versus the iPhone X

Posted:
in iPhone edited October 2018
Among all the changes in iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max versus the iPhone X, the camera saw the most detail work from Apple, with changes like a new sensor on the iPhone XS Max, a brand new depth control feature, and a new Smart HDR feature which is one of the biggest improvements.

iPhone X and iPhone XS Max
iPhone XS Max (left) and iPhone X (right)


We decided to take our iPhone XS Max and iPhone X to Couer d'Alene, Idaho and snap some photos to see how much the camera actually improved.




High Dynamic Range Comparison

Starting off with a selfie photo in harsh lighting conditions, both phones fared well. The iPhone XS Max did have better dynamic range. Some of the color in the sky is washed out on the iPhone X.

Taking a closer look, there's more detail with the iPhone XS Max as well.

iPhone XS selfie photo harsh lighting conditions
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max selfie in harsh lighting


Shooting against the sun, the iPhone XS Max does much better in terms of dynamic range. It's also able to bring more color into the photo.

iPhone XS Portrait mode against the sun
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max Portrait photo against the sun


In a portrait mode photo against the sun, the subject's face on the iPhone X image is extremely underexposed. On the iPhone XS Max, there is clearly more detail of not just the subject, but the surroundings.

Both phones do a great job with dynamic range and sharpness. Interestingly, the iPhone XS Max wide lens has a wider field of view than the one on the iPhone X, given the same distance from the subject, and same zoom.

iPhone XS wide lens zoom comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max wide zoom comparison


In this photo, we also see some pretty major improvements in dynamic range. The arms have a more linear exposure on the iPhone XS Max, even though the exposure of the background is the same with both phones.

iPhone XS backlit portrait for HDR
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max backlit portraits

Portrait mode and depth control

With the new depth control feature on the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max, we can now adjust the depth of the background. This also adjusts bokeh as well, which we'll show you a bit later.

iPhone XS Portrait Depth at F 1.4
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max portraits


The default setting is F4.5, but turning it up to F2.8 makes a decent improvement in blur. F1.4 is the maximum and it really makes the photo stand out compared to the photo array taken on the iPhone X.

iPhone XS Portrait Blur comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max Portrait Mode blur comparison


Apple's new depth control feature has an extremely wide range of adjustment from F16 to F1.4. This is much wider in practice, compared to other phones like the Samsung Galaxy Note 9, which can only go from its own zero to seven scale in terms of background blur, which we're guessing is about F10 to F2.0.

Even images of objects like a wooden post can look better when the blur is turned up on the XS Max. Here's the maximum distance at which you can snap a portrait mode photo.

iPhone XS maximum portrait distance with HDR
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max maximum Portrait mode distance


There is also a massive difference in dynamic range. The background on the iPhone X is extremely overexposed. The iPhone XS Max easily keeps the photo balanced and maintains all of the detail.

The shots we took are very near to the minimum range at which you can take a portrait photo -- and is uncomfortably close.

iPhone XS minimum portrait distance
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max minumum Potrait Mode distance comparison


Selfie portrait mode photos look great on both the iPhone X and iPhone XS Max, with the iPhone XS Max delivering more detail. You can adjust the depth on selfie portrait photos as well, which is something you can't do on other phones like the Galaxy Note 9.

iPhone XS selfie portrait mode at f 1.4
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max selfie Potrait Mode


With low-light portrait photography, much more color comes through on the XS Max. Even though the iPhone XS Max white balance is cooler compared to the iPhone X, the bokeh on the iPhone XS Max is warmer, closer to how it actually looks.

iphone xs low light portait mode
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max low light potrait photo

Autofocus auto-exposure speed comparison

We noticed that the iPhone X had drastic exposure changes while the iPhone XS Max adjustments were very smooth, and hunted for the optimal pointless. Not only that, but the dynamic range on the XS Max was many times better than the iPhone X during this test.

Photo detail comparison

While shooting some up-close photos of plants and flowers, the detail looked similar on both phones. However, the iPhone XS Max images seemed to be more balanced and a bit flat compared to the iPhone X photos, which had more contrast which made them look more detailed.

iPhone xs minimal focus range
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max minimal focus range detail comparison


iPhone xs flower detail
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max flower detail comparison


In a close-up shot of a tree, the iPhone XS Max had extremely accurate white balance, where the iPhone X's photo looked too cool. We also noticed much more detail with the iPhone XS Max as well.

iphone xs tree detail comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max detail comparison


In wider detail shots, the XS Max produced more vibrant colors on flowers and in the sky, while maintaining the great dynamic range.

iphone xs color and detal comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max color detail comparison


With the telephoto lens, there were significant improvements in detail as well. The XS Max continued to bring out more color in the sky and plants than the iPhone X was able to.

iphone xs telephoto lens detail comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max telephoto detail comparison


With a regular selfie photo, both phones did great in dynamic range, but the iPhone XS Max had much more detail in the face, so we can see that detail was improved all around.

iPhone XS selfie photo detail comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max selfie photo detail comparison

Low-light photo comparison

Moving indoors, we see an even bigger difference in dynamic range. As you can see in this photo, the lamp and the painting are extremely blown out on the iPhone X. Not only that, but the iPhone X is applying far more softening to the image than the iPhone XS Max, which you can see on the pants.

The iPhone XS Max is showing incredibly great dynamic range, and you can see every little detail on the painting.

iPhone XS low light HDR
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max low light HDR photo


An even bigger difference in dynamic range was demonstrated in a dark environment with very bright lights at a distance. The iPhone XS Max's photo was more balanced overall and you could see more color and detail in the background.

iphone XS
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max backlit HDR photo


We found the darkest spot we could find and snapped a photo. There was noticeably less noise on the iPhone XS Max's image, and it has much more detail. We can also see how much wider the wide lens is on the iPhone XS Max than the iPhone X.

iphone xs low light detail and noise comparison
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max very low light detail and noise


Later on in the evening, we snapped a photo of the night sky with buildings and bright lights in the foreground. The iPhone XS Max did better in terms of dynamic range, but we're still not completely happy with it.

iPhone xs bright light photo in darkness
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max bright lights in the darkness


Finally, we snapped a low light portrait photo in the office to compare blur. The colors of the bokeh on the iPhone XS Max were true to life and the tree was properly exposed. After adjusting the depth on the iPhone XS Max to F1.4, the bokeh looks even better.

iPhone XS low light bokeh
View full size - iPhone X versus iPhone XS Max low light bokeh comparison


You can easily tell how Apple is warping and rotating the bokeh balls depending on location in the frame. However, one downside to increasing the background blur is that any issues with blur edging become more noticeable.

The best iPhone camera yet

iPhone Xs Max and iPhone x cameras
iPhone XS Max and iPhone X


Overall, we're extremely impressed with the camera changes that Apple put into the XS & XS Max, after not originally expecting much in the way of differences in performance. Given this performance increase, upgraders coming from an iPhone 6S or iPhone 7 Plus -- the market Apple appears to be shooting for the most -- will see a monumental increase.

Deals on the iPhone X, XS and XS Max

If you haven't already ordered Apple's iPhone XS or XS Max, wireless carriers are incentivizing the purchase with buy one, get one $700 off promotions and more. Want to get your hands on a new iPhone asap? eBay sellers are also shipping units now.

Carrier deals:

  • AT&T Wireless: Buy one iPhone XS or iPhone XS Max, get a second $700 off when you add a line.
  • Verizon Wireless: Buy one iPhone XS or iPhone XS Max, get a second $700 off when you add a line. Or save $100 with an eligible trade.
  • Sprint: Get the 64GB iPhone XS for $0 per month with eligible trade-in and Sprint Flex lease.
  • T-Mobile: Save up to $300 on the iPhone XS with an eligible iPhone trade.
Those interested in saving $100 on the iPhone X can also do so at Verizon Wireless, AT&T Wireless, T-Mobile and Sprint.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    If we compare just camera, why XS Max and not XS at the same time? I think it isnot about sceen size if thi is about photo quality. It wousl be nice to see X vs. XS. vs. XS Max too. And yes pictures are impressiove and 1.4 aperture does what it is supposed to do: show color and fron subject details - not creating depth of view with so-so colors here and there.
    TomE
  • Reply 2 of 3
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,154member
    If we compare just camera, why XS Max and not XS at the same time? I think it isnot about sceen size if thi is about photo quality. It wousl be nice to see X vs. XS. vs. XS Max too. And yes pictures are impressiove and 1.4 aperture does what it is supposed to do: show color and fron subject details - not creating depth of view with so-so colors here and there.
    It’s the exact same cameras in the XS and XS Max.  So would be redundant.  This is to compare this years high end camera with last years high end camera.

    SoundJudgment
  • Reply 3 of 3
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,475member
    From the video commentary, I have the impression that many (all?) of the comparisons made are between HDR images. I'm not surprised Smart HDR does better than the X's HDR.
    I'm more interested in knowing how non-HDR images compare, because HDR can reduce detail due to camera or subject motion. On this point, the video presentation is ambiguous.
    edited October 2018
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