CodeWeavers ships CrossOver 18 with full macOS Mojave support

Posted:
in Mac Software
CodeWeavers has updated CrossOver, the application for running Windows applications on macOS desktops without using Windows itself, with version 18.0.0 introducing full support for macOS Mojave and numerous minor improvements.




The CodeWeavers team has updated Wine, the core technology behind CrossOver that allows Windows software to run on macOS and Linux, bringing it up to version 3.14. According to the company, the change makes "thousands of improvements" in CrossOver 18 over previous versions, just from its inclusion.

Among the bug fixes included in the release is a solution to a big that caused Office context menus to disappear from view, while another resolved issue involved a corrupt file error in Office 2016 when installed via Internet Explorer. Bugs relating to the Battle.net client are also said to have been fixed.

While there are changes that help macOS users, the bulk of the improvement in this release fall on the Linux version of the software. While not available to macOS users initially, it is likely the updates will cross over to the Mac version in a future release.

As part of the Linux-specific changes, version 18 includes improved support for DirectX 11 using Wine3D, making Windows games using the API run more smoothly. The Linux release is also the first to be compatible with DXVK, a Vulkan-based Direct3D 10 and Direct3D 11 implementation that can be installed into new and existing bottles using a crosstie.

Linux users also benefit from support for Direct3D 12 via UKD3D, a Direct3D-to-Vulkan translation library. Lastly, there is support for several popular Blizzard games, including World of Warcraft, Overwatch, and Diablo III.

CodeWeavers advise Mac users with active support entitlements will be upgraded to CrossOver 18 the next time they launch the application.

CrossOver 18 for Mac starts from $39.95 for the single version license, with one-year and lifetime versions featuring support and upgrades also available for $$59.95 and $499.95 respectively. Version 18.0.0 works with macOS 10.11 El Capitan and later, and requires an Intel-based Mac with at least 300 megabytes of free disk space and further capacity for Windows applications.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,516member
    Would I trust my mission critical data to something like this? Not me.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    lkrupp said:
    Would I trust my mission critical data to something like this? Not me.
    In what sense? The Wine emulation layer has been around for a very, very long time. It's actually quite good for older software. And file storage is handled at the base by the underlying operating system. Now if you want to run the latest games or graphic-intensive software, then you are right to be wary.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,774member
    Instead of the LifeTime version, you'd be better of buying a cheap PC!  
    entropys
  • Reply 4 of 12
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,374member
    MacPro said:
    Instead of the LifeTime version, you'd be better of buying a cheap PC!  
    Exactly what I was thinking.  
    Who thought that would be a good pricing structure? Because it kills it. In fact it is annoying:
    • $39.95 gets current version as is with no support and no updates.
    • $59.95 gets current version, plus support and updates over the next year.
    • $499.95 gets you lifetime support and updates for new versions.
    the lifetime version smells like a very poor investment. You might never get your investment back for a whole host of reasons. In fact you are better off getting the $39.95 version and settling for that until you wanted a new version yourself, maybe in five years’ time.  

    Or buying a competitor product that has a more reasonable and rational pricing structure.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    lkrupp said:
    Would I trust my mission critical data to something like this? Not me.
    Are you launching rockets into space?
    igohmmm
  • Reply 6 of 12
    eulereuler Posts: 78member
    I suppose there are folks who may have old proprietary apps or something like that who may want to use Macs who would benefit from a tool like this.
  • Reply 7 of 12
    Bootcamp is free. Windows 10 is free. 
  • Reply 8 of 12
    Bootcamp is free. Windows 10 is free. 
    Really? Where? Unless you are willing to commit a felony (piracy), I don't believe that's true.
    crowley
  • Reply 9 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,774member
    wd4fsu said:
    Bootcamp is free. Windows 10 is free. 
    Really? Where? Unless you are willing to commit a felony (piracy), I don't believe that's true.
    He may have been referring to the fact you can run in the full trial mode for a hell of a long time without issues other than no personalization screen options.  That is totally allowed by Microsoft. I have three Windows Pro Licenses and one machine (a macMini running Boot Camp) that I started as a test using it as a MySql server only, so I used a trial installation as I didn't think I'd use it for long.  Two years later it is still running and it just received the Windows October update and all malware and antivirus updates.  It's the Pro version so it able to be run in headless mode from a Mac with Microsoft RDT.  I will get around to buying a license but to be honest I am more curious to see just how long it works in trial mode.
    edited October 17
  • Reply 10 of 12
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 189member
    entropys said:
    MacPro said:
    Instead of the LifeTime version, you'd be better of buying a cheap PC!  
    Exactly what I was thinking.  
    Who thought that would be a good pricing structure? Because it kills it. In fact it is annoying:
    • $39.95 gets current version as is with no support and no updates.
    • $59.95 gets current version, plus support and updates over the next year.
    • $499.95 gets you lifetime support and updates for new versions.
    the lifetime version smells like a very poor investment. You might never get your investment back for a whole host of reasons. In fact you are better off getting the $39.95 version and settling for that until you wanted a new version yourself, maybe in five years’ time.  

    Or buying a competitor product that has a more reasonable and rational pricing structure.
    The lifetime version isn't meant to be a terribly good value. It's meant to be a way of voluntarily supporting the developers above and beyond a yearly subscription.

    There isn't really a competitor to Wine/CrossOver at this point.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    kpomkpom Posts: 608member
    lkrupp said:
    Would I trust my mission critical data to something like this? Not me.
    I use it to run the Windows version of Quicken (which is still far better than the Mac version). There are some quirks, but overall it works, and it saves the time and performance hit of running a virtual machine in the background.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Sadly Wine is an open-source project that has "had its day" - there is no way it can keep the pace with the evolution of real Windows. I have tried numerous times to run software on various versions of Crossover/Wine and always had some kind of fatal problem.
    VM's like VirtualBox are pretty darn good these days and the overhead is not that much of a issue any more.
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