Four new Macs spotted in Eurasian regulatory filings

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    maltzmaltz Posts: 149member
    hodar said:
    Please, for the love of God - let the new Mac Mini's allow users to add RAM and internal drives.

    Soldering down the RAM, means that I'll continue using my 2012 Mac Mini's with 16 GB RAM, and my homemade Fusion Drive.  I will not buy a hamstrung Mac Mini, I will find myself FORCED to go back to Windows (and I don't want to do that).
    You must be old
    You must not pay for your own gear.

    The last few Macs I bought personally, back when things were slightly more customizable, I found it was significantly cheaper to buy the Mac with minimum specs and actually throw away the RAM/HD they came with and replace them than it was to pay Apple's ridiculous prices on RAM and HD upgrades.  And I think the situation is even worse now, except nothing is replaceable, so you just get to pay what Apple says.
    edited October 2018 razorpitentropysargonauttipoo
  • Reply 22 of 40
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    wizard69 said:
    What ever Apple does the iMac needs to more serviceable than it is now.   The current approach just makes it a no buy for me.  I’m really hoping for a major Mini overhaul.   
    I bought an iMac 5K with maximum configuration when it first came out in 2014. Not one issue. A little pricey but very satisfied.
    argonaut
  • Reply 23 of 40
    Putzy said:
    Lets hope the new iMacs look like this: http://andrewhudsondesign.co.uk/imac-2019.html
    Nice, but if it lost the bottom chin, I wouldn't have a place for all my notes.
    razorpitmaltzrochfordargonaut
  • Reply 24 of 40
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,890member
    maltz said:
    hodar said:
    Please, for the love of God - let the new Mac Mini's allow users to add RAM and internal drives.

    Soldering down the RAM, means that I'll continue using my 2012 Mac Mini's with 16 GB RAM, and my homemade Fusion Drive.  I will not buy a hamstrung Mac Mini, I will find myself FORCED to go back to Windows (and I don't want to do that).
    You must be old
    You must not pay for your own gear.

    The last few Macs I bought personally, back when things were slightly more customizable, I found it was significantly cheaper to buy the Mac with minimum specs and actually throw away the RAM/HD they came with and replace them than it was to pay Apple's ridiculous prices on RAM and HD upgrades.  And I think the situation is even worse now, except nothing is replaceable, so you just get to pay what Apple says.
    Exactly. If anything ruins the Apple experience for me, it is rather extortionate prices you have to pay for anything with more capability than base configuration. This was not the case when you could always upgrade the RAM and drives yourself.
    the G5 iMac actually made it a virtue you could take the back off, diagnose the problem and fix it. From the first intel iMac it was like Apple deliberately reversed course and made it hard to replace even the PRAM battery. Then things got a bit better for a while, but now, having to remove a glued screen is pretty ordinary, to say the least. Is is not user friendly.
    i really hope things are about to get better in Macworld.
    larz2112argonaut
  • Reply 25 of 40
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,698member
    Although it's not mentioned in the article, Apple did say last year that the mini was important to them, so I'm expecting one of those to be a refreshed mini. I'm all for being able to upgrade your own RAM, but TB3 makes it irrelevant to replace your internal SSD really (though I wouldn't mind that being upgradable as well). The fact of the matter is that the SSD that comes with Macs now will very likely last for as long as you keep the machine, which is going to be about 5-6 years typically.

    I see no reason why Apple has to accommodate the incredibly tiny market of curmudgeons who don't want to buy another Mac for the next 10+ years -- there's plenty of proof that soldering in the components has dramatically dropped repair needs, and of course hanging on to an obsolete machine excessively (and by this I specifically mean two years or more after the last OS version the machine can run has come out) is both a massive security risk and bad for the company's business.
    stompyfastasleep
  • Reply 26 of 40
    maltz said:
    hodar said:
    Please, for the love of God - let the new Mac Mini's allow users to add RAM and internal drives.

    Soldering down the RAM, means that I'll continue using my 2012 Mac Mini's with 16 GB RAM, and my homemade Fusion Drive.  I will not buy a hamstrung Mac Mini, I will find myself FORCED to go back to Windows (and I don't want to do that).
    You must be old
    You must not pay for your own gear.

    The last few Macs I bought personally, back when things were slightly more customizable, I found it was significantly cheaper to buy the Mac with minimum specs and actually throw away the RAM/HD they came with and replace them than it was to pay Apple's ridiculous prices on RAM and HD upgrades.  And I think the situation is even worse now, except nothing is replaceable, so you just get to pay what Apple says.
    I agree.  I don't know why people think it is so unreasonable or antiquated to prefer to have the option to upgrade the RAM and hard drive in a computer that you bought and have owned for 2-3 years in order to improve performance and extend the life of the system. Case in point:

    I have a late 2012 dual core i5 Mac mini. In 2014 I was hoping to replace it with one of the new systems, but like many, I was underwhelmed, especially since Apple got rid of the quad-core option, and the benchmarks were no better, and in some cases worse than the 2012 models. So I continued to use my 2012 i5 Mac mini. In 2016 I came close to buying a used or refurbished 2012 quad-core i7 Mac mini, but I kept assumming Apple would refresh the mini soon and I should wait. Instead, I increased the RAM and replaced the hard drive with an SSD drive. This improved the performance, allowed me to keep up with new software requirements, and extended the life and usability of the comptuer. That would not have been possible if the hard drive and/or RAM was soldered in place, or the system had a T2 security chip that which made it impossible to perform relatively simple upgrades myself. 

    I really don't think it is unreasonable at all to want or expect to be able to perform relatively simple upgrades to YOUR computer to improve performance and extend the usability after you have owned it 2-3 years. It has been, and current is possible with the vast majority of computers, including many Apple computers.

    And here's the thing. If Apple makes it possible for end-users to upgrade hard drives and RAM, then everyone is happy. Those who don't want to be bothered with upgrades can pay upfront to upgrade their system when they buy it from Apple. Those who prefer to upgrade their systems on their own can still do so down the road. But if Apple makes it impossible for end-users to upgrade their systems after purchase, then they are alienating and possibly losing a segment of their customer base. Maybe that's a tradeoff they are willing to make in order to reduce repairs, and force customers to pay inflated prices for upgrades at the time of purchase. 
    entropys
  • Reply 27 of 40
    laytechlaytech Posts: 152member
    Surely, surely, there will be a new iMac mini - surely
  • Reply 28 of 40
    anomeanome Posts: 1,303member
    laytech said:
    Surely, surely, there will be a new iMac mini - surely


    Now there's an idea. Would that be just the 21.5" iMac, or one with an even smaller screen, say 19" or 17", even? I don't know if that was just a typo, but it's an interesting idea. I mean, personally, if I buy another iMac, I'd go for as big a screen as possible since I'm obsessed with screen real estate, but some people might like a smaller one.

    I'd like to see a new Mac mini. I'd also like to see it with more than 2 cores, and with a decent amount of RAM. If they're building them to be rackable, having the grunt and resources to run multiple VMs is essential, plus I like to mess about with them myself.

  • Reply 29 of 40
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,026member
    Hope new Macbook that basically replaces the function keys Macbook Pro that Apple has not updated in 2018. Make this new Macbook with the spec similar to 2018 13" touchbar Macbook Pro without touchbar and price that much lees without touchbar. Basically,we are asking 2018 function keys Macbook Pro. Macbook Pro either offer with touch screen or no touchbar.
  • Reply 30 of 40
    larz2112 said:
    Of the brand new, unidentified part numbers, I think A1993 will be a new Mac Mini, A2115 and A2116 will be redesigned 21.5" and 27" iMacs respectively (only because the current iMacs are also consecutive, A1418 and A1419), and A1932 will be a new MacBook, maybe 13".

    Is it Tuesday, 10 AM EST yet???

    A1347 is the mini. 
  • Reply 31 of 40
    nhtnht Posts: 4,496member
    larz2112 said:

    I agree.  I don't know why people think it is so unreasonable or antiquated to prefer to have the option to upgrade the RAM and hard drive in a computer that you bought and have owned for 2-3 years in order to improve performance and extend the life of the system. Case in point:

    ..

    I really don't think it is unreasonable at all to want or expect to be able to perform relatively simple upgrades to YOUR computer to improve performance and extend the usability after you have owned it 2-3 years. It has been, and current is possible with the vast majority of computers, including many Apple computers.
    It’s not unreasonable to you to want an inexpensive machine you can upgrade for six+ years but it is unreasonable to expect Apple to cater to customers that want to do that.

    The reasonable action is that after six years of frustration with any vendor that the customer moves on.

    Apple likes a 3 year replacement cycle and seems to optimize for it.  None of what you wrote matters in that context (increasing ram, etc).
  • Reply 32 of 40
    maltz said:
    hodar said:
    Please, for the love of God - let the new Mac Mini's allow users to add RAM and internal drives.

    Soldering down the RAM, means that I'll continue using my 2012 Mac Mini's with 16 GB RAM, and my homemade Fusion Drive.  I will not buy a hamstrung Mac Mini, I will find myself FORCED to go back to Windows (and I don't want to do that).
    You must be old
    You must not pay for your own gear.

    The last few Macs I bought personally, back when things were slightly more customizable, I found it was significantly cheaper to buy the Mac with minimum specs and actually throw away the RAM/HD they came with and replace them than it was to pay Apple's ridiculous prices on RAM and HD upgrades.  And I think the situation is even worse now, except nothing is replaceable, so you just get to pay what Apple says.
    Lol.  I do buy all my gear.  The fact that you said gear def means you are old
    fastasleep
  • Reply 33 of 40
    larz2112 said:
    Of the brand new, unidentified part numbers, I think A1993 will be a new Mac Mini, A2115 and A2116 will be redesigned 21.5" and 27" iMacs respectively (only because the current iMacs are also consecutive, A1418 and A1419), and A1932 will be a new MacBook, maybe 13".

    Is it Tuesday, 10 AM EST yet???

    A1347 is the mini. 
    A1347 is the current Mac Mini. My speculation is that A1993 is a new "Pro" Mini that will have a different design/look.
  • Reply 34 of 40
    nht said:
    larz2112 said:

    I agree.  I don't know why people think it is so unreasonable or antiquated to prefer to have the option to upgrade the RAM and hard drive in a computer that you bought and have owned for 2-3 years in order to improve performance and extend the life of the system. Case in point:
    ..
    I really don't think it is unreasonable at all to want or expect to be able to perform relatively simple upgrades to YOUR computer to improve performance and extend the usability after you have owned it 2-3 years. It has been, and current is possible with the vast majority of computers, including many Apple computers.
    It’s not unreasonable to you to want an inexpensive machine you can upgrade for six+ years but it is unreasonable to expect Apple to cater to customers that want to do that.
    The reasonable action is that after six years of frustration with any vendor that the customer moves on.
    Apple likes a 3 year replacement cycle and seems to optimize for it.  None of what you wrote matters in that context (increasing ram, etc).
    I would not categorize offering computers with user-upgradable RAM and hard drive(s) as "catering", especially since the majority of computers currently allow for that option, and have so for decades. I would call it "typical", or "standard". And in my case, I disagree that it is reasonable to move on after six years because 1) It has not been six years of frustration, more like three years of making do with what I have; 2) I have a significant investment in Mac software and hardware, and well-versed in using it, so moving on to a comparable Windows system would not be reasonable; 3) The Mac Pros are equally dated and much more expensive, not a reasonable option for me; 4) I already have a decent monitor, and music production is what I primarily use my Mac for, so I have no need for a system with a built-in Retina screen like an iMac. So spending the extra money for something I don't need or want does not seem reasonable to me.

    If Apple likes a three year replacement cycle, they should have updated the Mac Mini and Mac Pro product lines at least a year ago. And even if Apple designs for a three year replacement cycle, user-upgradeable RAM and hard drives do matter,  because 1) The prices Apple charges to upgrade at the time of purchase are grossly inflated 2) Due to software updates, increase in workload, and other factors, the need may arise to upgrade RAM and/or hard drive within years 1-3. You buy a new computer with more RAM and hard drive speed/space than you currently need. A year or two later one of your primary pieces of software releases a new version that you'd love to use, but you can't because RAM requirements exceed what you currently have, and the computer manufacturer made an intentional decision to prevent customers from upgrading RAM and/or hard drive(s) after purchase. What options are available? Buy another new computer after a year or two? To me, that is not very reasonable. 
  • Reply 35 of 40
    Wishing for a new Macbook Air with 16-18 hour battery life and retinal display at 13-15 inches.  Why?   Because I want to use a real keyboard again.   You know, the thing that doesn't wake up the whole neighborhood  or require a genius bar visit if you decide to eat a cookie while you type.  
  • Reply 36 of 40
    larz2112 said:
    larz2112 said:
    Of the brand new, unidentified part numbers, I think A1993 will be a new Mac Mini, A2115 and A2116 will be redesigned 21.5" and 27" iMacs respectively (only because the current iMacs are also consecutive, A1418 and A1419), and A1932 will be a new MacBook, maybe 13".

    Is it Tuesday, 10 AM EST yet???

    A1347 is the mini. 
    A1347 is the current Mac Mini. My speculation is that A1993 is a new "Pro" Mini that will have a different design/look.
    It’s my speculation you’re going to be disappointed. Apple wouldn’t list a 2014 model on that regulatory filing. That’s the updated mini, and I don’t think Apple’s going to bring out two different models of Mac mini. But who knows?
  • Reply 37 of 40
    I heard the codename for the new Mac Pro is 'dodo'
  • Reply 38 of 40
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,890member
    nht said:
    larz2112 said:

    I agree.  I don't know why people think it is so unreasonable or antiquated to prefer to have the option to upgrade the RAM and hard drive in a computer that you bought and have owned for 2-3 years in order to improve performance and extend the life of the system. Case in point:

    ..

    I really don't think it is unreasonable at all to want or expect to be able to perform relatively simple upgrades to YOUR computer to improve performance and extend the usability after you have owned it 2-3 years. It has been, and current is possible with the vast majority of computers, including many Apple computers.
    It’s not unreasonable to you to want an inexpensive machine you can upgrade for six+ years but it is unreasonable to expect Apple to cater to customers that want to do that.

    The reasonable action is that after six years of frustration with any vendor that the customer moves on.

    Apple likes a 3 year replacement cycle and seems to optimize for it.  None of what you wrote matters in that context (increasing ram, etc).
    I would happily go for a three year upgrade cycle and soldered ram and SSD if
    • every three years Apple released a new machine I really, really want and so desirable I just have to have it, rather than put up for sale the exact same machine I had bought three years ago;
    • upgraded RAM and SDD options from base model were available at a reasonable price. That is, within a bull’s roar of what it would cost to buy that RAM or SDD in a retail package in the nearest retail shop. Heck even 10 or 15% above retail would do.
    larz2112
  • Reply 39 of 40
    tipoo said:
    nht said:
    hodar said:
    Please, for the love of God - let the new Mac Mini's allow users to add RAM and internal drives.

    Soldering down the RAM, means that I'll continue using my 2012 Mac Mini's with 16 GB RAM, and my homemade Fusion Drive.  I will not buy a hamstrung Mac Mini, I will find myself FORCED to go back to Windows (and I don't want to do that).
    Unless it's a "pro mini" I doubt the RAM will be user replaceable.  

    If they put 32GB in the thing and you refuse to buy one just because then that's just silly.


    But a more upstream/Pro focused Mini is exactly the rumor. It's supposedly larger, or a top end model is. 

    Hoping larger means RAM/Storage are easily accessible. This, this was pure bullshit (2012 to 2014 model pictured, they moved the steel plate to the bottom for seemingly no reason but to hamper upgrades) 

    Image result for 2014 mac mini review ars
    That plate takes about fifteen seconds to remove. I replaced the drive in a 2014 model in about half an hour recently. You’ve never even tried to open a 2014 mini or you’d already know that. 
  • Reply 40 of 40
    Putzy said:
    Lets hope the new iMacs look like this: http://andrewhudsondesign.co.uk/imac-2019.html
    Nice, but if it lost the bottom chin, I wouldn't have a place for all my notes.
    You know there’s an app for that, right?
    christopher126
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