11-inch 2018 iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch 2017 iPad Pro performance, head to head

Posted:
in iPad edited November 13
The new 2018 iPad Pro is a marvel of engineering, with a brilliant new design and a chip so powerful that it gives even the most premium laptops a run for their money. AppleInsider takes a closer look at its performance, to see if it is worth getting the new model, or buying 2017 10.5-inch iPad Pro at a discounted price.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro
2018 11-inch iPad Pro


Since both 11- and 12.9-inch iPad Pros are equipped with the same A12X Bionic chip, we're going to use the 11-inch model for this test. We're also not using the 1TB of storage model that packs 6GB of RAM instead of the usual 4GB, but we acknowledge that if you've got over $1,500 to spend on the most expensive model, you can expect a little bit better performance overall.




Benchmarks

Starting with Geekbench 4's CPU benchmark, the 11-inch iPad Pro achieved a single-core score of 5,028, compared to 3,976 on the 10.5-inch model. In multi-core, the 11-inch Pro scored 18,181 compared to 9,555 on the 10.5-inch iPad Pro, matching Apple's claimed improvement of 90 percent.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Geekbench 4 CPU comparison
2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Geekbench 4 CPU comparison


While benchmarks across radically different hardware platforms isn't a straight-across compare, the new iPad Pro benchmark score nears that of the best processor option in the 2017 5K iMac at 19,327 points.

With Geekbench 4's graphics test, the 11-inch 2018 iPad Pro got a score of 42,270 compared to 31,259 on the 2017 model, so we're only seeing an increase of around 36 percent. The new 11-inch iPad Pro managed only a couple of thousand points behind the $2399 2018 15-inch MacBook Pro on the same graphics test, which scored 44,308 points.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Geekbench 4 graphics
2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Geekbench 4 graphics


However, the 36 percent increase demonstrated by the Geekbench test is nowhere near the double graphics performance that Apple claimed during the keynote.

Expanding the testing to Antutu, the new iPad Pro scored 569,077 points, over twice the 10.5-inch iPad Pro at 272,986. The new iPad Pro established a new record for the benchmark, which was previously set by the iPhone XS Max when it scored 363,000 points in our testing, so Apple is currently way ahead of the market in terms of phone and tablet processor performance.



Running Antutu's HTML 5 test, the new iPad Pro scored 49,599 points compared to 41,304 on the 10.5-inch iPad Pro. This marks the highest score that we've seen from that particular test.

Using browser-centric Octane 2.0, the 11-inch iPad Pro scored 44,441 points compared to 33,850 on the older model. This is a notable increase in performance, but how much any given user will see this will vary a great deal on network conditions and what exactly is being rendered.

We then ran Basemark's metal graphics test, and the 11-inch iPad Pro scored 5,215 points compared to 2525 on the 10.5-inch Pro. This also lends crecedence to Apple's doubling of performance claim.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Basemark Metal
2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Basemark Metal


Finishing off with our final graphics test, GFXBench's 1080p Manhattan offscreen test, the new 11-inch iPad Pro scored 16,362 compared to only 7,033 on the old model, substantially more than double the score.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro GFXBench 1080P Manhattan offscreen test
2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro GFXBench 1080P Manhattan offscreen test


The 10.5-inch iPad Pro from 2017 was already outperforming so many other devices on the market, and the new tests only solidify that lead.

Video Tests

To test the iPad Pro models' video editing prowess, we took a 1 minute 4K video shot at 60 frames per second, applied a filter and exported it to 1080P using Adobe Rush. The 11-inch iPad Pro finished exporting in only 2 minutes and 56 seconds compared to 6 minutes and 10 seconds on the 10.5-inch iPad Pro, again more than twice as fast.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro vs 10.5-imcj iPad Pro Adobe Rush HEVC export test
2018 11-inch iPad Pro vs 10.5-imcj iPad Pro Adobe Rush HEVC export test


Now for the photo editing, we exported 50 edited JPG images in Adobe Lightroom CC. The 11-inch iPad Pro finished in 2 minutes and 33 seconds, while the 10.5-inch iPad Pro finished in 2 minutes and 58 seconds. There really isn't much of a difference here, even though the processor is much faster on the new iPad Pro.

2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Adobe Lightroom export test
2018 11-inch iPad Pro versus 10.5-inch iPad Pro Adobe Lightroom export test


While editing the photos themselves, we noticed that the UI was more responsive and applying effects was noticeably faster on the new iPad Pro, but for this use case, the 10.5-inch iPad Pro was already fast enough for most users.

Overall, we're extremely pleased with the performance of the new iPad Pro. We're seeing the equivalent of high-end desktop-level performance in a tablet that's only 5.9mm thick. These kind of numbers have reignited speculation that Apple is aiming to implement its custom designed ARM processors into the Mac lineup sometime in the near future.

Where to buy

Apple authorized resellers offer a variety of perks on iPad Pro purchases, including no sales tax on orders shipped outside New York and New Jersey at Adorama, plus free shipping within the contiguous U.S. Shoppers can also take advantage of financing incentives with the Adorama Credit Card, such as no interest when paid in full within six months on iPad Pro orders over $500 -- or no interest when paid in full within 12 months on iPad Pros over $1,000. With the holidays fast approaching, having a little extra time to pay off the purchase can be beneficial.

Backorders are filled on a first come, first served basis, so you'll want to reserve your spot in line today for the fastest availability. Adorama will not charge your credit card until your order is ready to ship.

Those looking for an iPad Pro right away can also shop in-stock models at Abt.com with no sales tax collected on orders shipped outside Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin.

For deals across all iPad lines, including dicounts of up to $150 off 10.5-inch models, be sure to check out our iPad Price Guide.

11" iPad Pros

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    Nice testing. These real world rendering and video exporting tests really shut down the claims one sometimes sees about not needing mobile devices to be any faster, how much faster do they need it to launch an app, etc. I’ve done video editing on an iphone and ipad and the speed gains are welcome.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 19
    thttht Posts: 2,967member
    Can you post what the landscape software keyboard looks like?

    When the 10.5 came out, it had a full horizontally spaced keys on the software keyboard in landscape, and that was basically would kicked me into buying it. Still not fully spaced vertically, but close enough. 

    The wider 11” model will be wide enough to add another column of fully spaced keys, like and escape, tab and a meta key. The more they improve the keyboard, the better and better it becomes a computing device.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 19
    It's just about a given that Apple will migrate it's laptops etc to ARM in the future with these specs. Obviously more work will need to happen, but it's approaching.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 19
    You can marvel at the high price, but it seems like anyone who really needs this much power shouldn’t have too much trouble justifying the price (and probably writing it off on their taxes). For everybody else, there’s the regular iPad. I have the 10.5” Pro, and I’ve never for a second regretted the purchase, but I also recognize that it’s more than I really need.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 19
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    mcdavewatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 19
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 19
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,516member
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    edited November 13 hypoluxawatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 19
    With the tech we see right now, Apple could add mouse/trackpad support to iOS, install the iPad Pro guts into a MacBook body, and we'd have the next generation of MacBooks.
  • Reply 9 of 19
    lkrupp said:
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Totally agree here.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 19
    lkrupp said:
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Many developers use Macs, not only for iOS development, but to run VM's to do Windows and Android development.  It'll be interesting to see what happens when Apple transitions its Macs to ARM processors.
  • Reply 11 of 19
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,000member
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    But that wouldn’t solve the problem. Also send are good but the A12X is already beating the 2400G & 2700U as an APU.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 19
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,000member
    Good review (background music might need to duck a tad).  Good to see the real-world tests coming through.  I think hardware tessellation is what’s boosting graphics rather than raw compute (hence the detail in the basketball game on the keynote) shame GFXBench Tessellation test doesn’t work on iOS.

    A couple of requests;

    1) on video; can we have h264 vs h265 exports from several products? There should be some hardware acceleration happening here as with the T2.

    2) on photos; can we have Affinity Photo macros running comparisons rather than just import/export? Though on export, HEIC tests as I think that’s on new silicon too.


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 19
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,374member
    Must not drop this iPad pro
    Must not drop this iPad pro
    Though the new iPad Pro beckons.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 19
    entropys said:
    Must not drop this iPad pro
    Must not drop this iPad pro
    Though the new iPad Pro beckons.
    Try not to put it anywhere that might cause it to bend too. From this video the rigidity of the device is mostly from the screen
    edited November 13
  • Reply 15 of 19
    lkrupp said:
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Many developers use Macs, not only for iOS development, but to run VM's to do Windows and Android development.  It'll be interesting to see what happens when Apple transitions its Macs to ARM processors.
    Apple wants Mac's to die, they want people to buy iPads, so Apple can cream 30% off all sales, as everything needs to go through the app store. They are making the iPad as powerful as they can to entice software developers to release full versions of their products on the closed platform.

    Without the software support, the iPad will just remain a mainly consumption device.

    Will software developers follow apples wishes, it would surely depend on sales figures and I thought iPad sales were on the decline, so that won't help apple reach its long term objective. 
  • Reply 16 of 19
    saltyzip said:
    lkrupp said:
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Many developers use Macs, not only for iOS development, but to run VM's to do Windows and Android development.  It'll be interesting to see what happens when Apple transitions its Macs to ARM processors.
    Apple wants Mac's to die, they want people to buy iPads, so Apple can cream 30% off all sales, as everything needs to go through the app store. They are making the iPad as powerful as they can to entice software developers to release full versions of their products on the closed platform.

    Without the software support, the iPad will just remain a mainly consumption device.

    Will software developers follow apples wishes, it would surely depend on sales figures and I thought iPad sales were on the decline, so that won't help apple reach its long term objective. 
    " thought iPad sales were on the decline, so that won't help apple reach its long term objective. "

    It's sort of been a roller coaster.  In the beginning sales skyrocketed but then started to decline after the introduction of the iPad Air.  When the first iPad Pro was revealed, sales increased again a little bit but then according to the last couple of financial conference calls, sales were flat or slightly declining.  Matter of fact, per Q4 FY2018 results, revenue from Mac sales were almost double revenue from iPad sales, so the Mac is a healthy business.  And if the Mac did, how are developers going to develop for iOS?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 19
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,791member
    saltyzip said:
    lkrupp said:
    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    They're working on Thunderbolt3 for ARM. Then, they'll release a machine that has an Intel "sidekick" processor for backward compatibility.

    Intel won't allow emulation of x86 on ARM and, unfortunately, AMD bargained most of its rights away, such that if Apple were to buy AMD, it won't help. Of course, they could buy Intel, but I don't think they want that kind of overhead.


    Apple doesn't have to buy AMD but they could use AMD processors instead of Intel.  The newer AMD processors starting with Zen 2 architecture look extremely competitive, if not better, compared to Intel's offerings.
    I think both of you are whistling past the graveyard. The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Many developers use Macs, not only for iOS development, but to run VM's to do Windows and Android development.  It'll be interesting to see what happens when Apple transitions its Macs to ARM processors.
    Apple wants Mac's to die, they want people to buy iPads, so Apple can cream 30% off all sales, as everything needs to go through the app store. They are making the iPad as powerful as they can to entice software developers to release full versions of their products on the closed platform.

    Without the software support, the iPad will just remain a mainly consumption device.

    Will software developers follow apples wishes, it would surely depend on sales figures and I thought iPad sales were on the decline, so that won't help apple reach its long term objective. 

    1. Apple does not want Mac sales to die - they want their reliance on Intel to whither away.

    2. Not everything needs to go through the AppStore, institutions can install applications directly onto iOS devices. And a vast majority of software profits are made in the enterprise, not sold individually to end users.

    3. IOS is not a “closed” platform... I can download the developers tools, write my own apps and install them on my iOS devices. The only thing thing closed is the software distribution model. Even then, I could give someone my code and they can compile it and install it on their own device.
    macpluspluswatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 19
    lkrupp said:

    The Mac will move to Apple’s A chips and that will the end of Windows and Linux on the Mac unless those developers produce ARM versions. The emulation crowd is loud and raucous but ultimately a tiny subset of the market. I would bet serious money that macOS is already running on an A12 Bionic in a secret lab somewhere inside Apple Park.
    Both Linux and Windows 10 already run on ARM. On the other hand many professionals rely on both x86 compatibility and the ability to run efficient virtual machines. Much of modern enterprise software development for example is wholly dependent on those technologies. It isn’t clear if Apples’ CPU designs allow for versatile VMs and x86 emulation is problematic (mostly because Intel is threatening legal action). I think that if Apple does transition to ARM it won’t be the whole product line. Pro level Macs will remain Intel based for the foreseeable future. 
    edited November 13 watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 19
    Nice testing. These real world rendering and video exporting tests really shut down the claims one sometimes sees about not needing mobile devices to be any faster, how much faster do they need it to launch an app, etc. I’ve done video editing on an iphone and ipad and the speed gains are welcome.

    Few key points to note:

    1. Nobody is "against" progress of SoCs having more raw power. The better the higher-end becomes, the mid-range/low-end phones also benefit from the performance gains.

    2. Question is - how much % of phone users "actually utilize" that raw power available?

    3. If the answer to above question is <10%, then it leads to more questions - Is this not a case of "niche" market which Apple usually does NOT cater to? Like people who need 3.5mm jack, larger battery, dual sim, expandable memory and so on?

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