Apple shares photos shot on iPhone XR

Posted:
in iPhone edited November 2018
Following the release of iPhone XR last month, Apple on Thursday shared a collection of photos showing off the handset's image capture capabilities, from Smart HDR to Portrait selfies.

iPhone XR
iPhone XR sample photo by Austin Mann.


Circulated in a press release, the selection of iPhone XR photos was pulled from Instagram posts by prominent artists and common iPhone users alike. Many of the shots were taken and published late last month when the handset shipped out to early preorder customers.

Each of the "Shot on iPhone XR" images highlights a unique attribute or software feature of Apple's recently released smartphone, while text accompanying the photos touts the hardware's ability to capture "stunning images" out of the box.

Of note, Apple throws a spotlight on single-lens Portrait mode. The feature enables iPhone XR to add natural bokeh to portrait photos, simulating depth of field effects commonly seen in pictures taken by larger dedicated camera systems. Apple also calls attention to iPhone XR's wide-angle lens and low-light capabilities.

View this post on Instagram

Color of autumn @apple #shotoniphone #shotoniphonexr ____________________________________________________________ * * #beautifuldestinations #wilderness_culture #lifewelltraveled #modernoutdoors #folkvibe #earthpix #earthfocus #earthofficial #discoverearth #voyaged #depthofearth #lifeofadventure #folkcreative #travelingourplanet #destinationearth #travelawesome #hubs_united #instagood #exploretocreate #ourmoodydays #igworldclub #folkscenery #folkgreen #naturegeography #dscvr_earth #ournaturedays #visualsofearth #folkgood

A post shared by Eric Cheung (@ericube.23) on Nov 11, 2018 at 8:28pm PST

View this post on Instagram

Outdoor activities are on the rise in our side of the world. Yay to our winter'! #WHPseasonal #shotoniPhone XR

A post shared by Herald Herrera (@heraldherrera) on Nov 11, 2018 at 1:15pm PST

View this post on Instagram

Happy Diwali!!! . Shot these images on the iPhone XR and must say that this phone gives you the right bang for the buck!!! Great in low light and the colours are fabulous! . #shotoniphone #apple #india #diwali #celebration #ShotoniPhoneXR #mobilephonephotography #lamps #light #festival

A post shared by Ashish Parmar (@ashishjparmar) on Nov 6, 2018 at 6:17am PST

Beyond the camera, Apple notes the XR's 6.1-inch Liquid Retina display serves as an ideal viewfinder, while Smart HDR delivers better highlight and shadow detail in a variety of hard to shoot situations. Finally, Apple says iPhone XR boasts the best battery life of any iPhone to date, a claim backed up by independent testing

View this post on Instagram

Petrified Forest National Park was fun to shoot with iPhone XR - the Smart HDR thrives capturing this type of environment. Did you get a XR today? Have any questions? See link in profile for full review!

A post shared by Austin Mann (@austinmann) on Oct 26, 2018 at 2:05pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

#ShotoniPhone XR. It's always good to visit Al Serkal Avenue.

A post shared by Herald Herrera (@heraldherrera) on Nov 3, 2018 at 9:11am PDT

Apple's mid-tier iPhone XR was announced in September alongside the company's flagship iPhone XS series. Like the XS, iPhone XR is powered by Apple's A12 Bionic processor and features a front-facing TrueDepth camera system enabling Face ID facial recognition. The nearly edge-to-edge Liquid Retina display features rounded corners, again similar to XS, though it relies on LCD instead of OLED technology.

The 12-megapixel rear camera lauded in today's press release is borrowed from the XS, and is the first of Apple's single lens shooters to boast advanced photography functions like Portrait mode and Portrait Lighting.

The handset went up for sale in October.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Just wanted to congratulate the authors here at AI for fixing something that had until recently been overlooked for years... giving credit to the sources of photos. Hooray!
  • Reply 2 of 11
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    n2itivguyttollertonpeterhartedredKidGloves
  • Reply 3 of 11
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    Awesome point.  
    peterhart
  • Reply 4 of 11
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,770member
    iPhone XR is good in every respect except in portrait mode like it's sibling.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    It’s likely the natural depth of field from focussing on something closeup.
    edredn2itivguyStrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 11
    georgie01 said:
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    It’s likely the natural depth of field from focussing on something closeup.


    I think you are right. I tried taking a Macro type shot and got a natural blur for the background elements, without using Portrait Mode.

    I did use an XS Max, but I don't think that matters.

  • Reply 7 of 11
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,962member
    The quality of phone camera is stunning nowadays. It can be comparable to SLR quality a decade ago. Very impressive.
    waltg
  • Reply 8 of 11
    fallenjt said:
    The quality of phone camera is stunning nowadays. It can be comparable to SLR quality a decade ago. Very impressive.
    Yes it is, just recently took a trip west, used my "old iPhone 6" took lots of pics and video, used mac and appletv to show on tv, neighbors were blown away by them, they couldn't believe that they all were done on my phone! I used to carry cameras, but got away from that with my phone, now looking at a new XR...
  • Reply 9 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,905member
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    Physics.  There's no bokeh just a depth of focus effect.  Bokeh artifacts are caused by diffraction of spectral highlights on the shutter blades on a conventional camera lens but the term is constantly misused to refer to the depth of focus blur which is a natural effect of a lens with a large aperture (small aperture number for the non-camera folks, e.g. f/1.8) which gives a very narrow depth of focus. 
    edited November 2018 n2itivguyStrangeDays
  • Reply 10 of 11
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,953member
    georgie01 said:
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    It’s likely the natural depth of field from focussing on something closeup.
    It's funny how people think that the only way to achieve this effect is using post-processing effects like portrait mode.  As with many things in the digital world, it's a simulation of a real life phenomenon that you can... you know... just do in real life too.
    beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 11 of 11
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,905member
    auxio said:
    georgie01 said:
    How did the Eric get the shot of the leaf with the bokeh effect? I thought the iPhone XR was limited to human subjects in portrait mode. Does Apple show pictures taken from third party apps as well?
    It’s likely the natural depth of field from focussing on something closeup.
    It's funny how people think that the only way to achieve this effect is using post-processing effects like portrait mode.  As with many things in the digital world, it's a simulation of a real life phenomenon that you can... you know... just do in real life too.
    Right, it's still an analog lens I assume so the same laws of physics would apply.  There is no reason to assume all the background blur in images taken with iPhones are digitally produced although I appreciate Apple has developed exactly that ability on demand.
    edited November 2018
Sign In or Register to comment.