Algoriddim's new unified djay for iOS goes free with subscription, adds new hardware suppo...

Posted:
in iOS edited December 2018
Algoriddim's new djay for iOS has moved to a subscription model, and includes beat-matching, A12 Bionic machine learning, plus iPad Pro USB-C support.

loops
Loops in Algodiddim's new day for iOS


Algoriddim has been making djay for iPad, iPhone, and Mac for eight years, winning Apple Design Awards and being featured in Apple Keynotes along the way. The new version is a unified one across all of Apple's iOS hardware, with a bunch of new features added, and older ones improved.

classic mode
djay classic mode on iPhone


The app launches in Classic Mode, with two turntables and a mixer. Load up two songs and mix between them, and virtual grooves are drawn on the screen so you can identify the breaks in the music. You can apply one of five free effects to either track.

The simplest way to mix is Automix mode. In Automix mode, you view all your tracks, and with one tap, djay mixes all of them with optimal transition points using machine learning and the "AI Automix engine."

automix
Automix mode in landscape. It works in portrait as well.


The new version also has Spotify integration, giving you access to a huge library of songs if you're a Spotify subscriber. The integration allows users to match songs that go well with what's currently playing, and provide a list of matching songs based on danceability, BPM, key, and music style. It's also able to save songs to Spotify collections and playlists from within djay.

If you have a Pioneer, Reloop, or Mixtour controller, djay is able to work with it immediately. All these features are free, where different versions of djay used to be paid-for apps.

What's different now is that djay is moving to a subscription model, and unlocking pro features with the subscription. In addition to the supported controllers in the free level, a paid subscription unlocks support for over 50 MIDI controllers from Pioneer DJ, Reloop, Numark, Denon DJ, and others. It also adds an advanced MIDI learn system to map each control on users' hardware individually and enables support for Bluetooth MIDI.

Subscription also unlocks unlimited access to a 1GB library of samples, loops, FX, and visuals with content provided by Loopmasters, Future Loops, DocOptic, Sugar Bytes, and others, and a looper and sequencer, so you can begin performing tracks in addition to mixing and spinning. Users who want to make it into a performance can load up the grid-based Looper with up to 48 loops, and djay will time-stretch them and match them to the beat in real-time.

cue points
Cue points!


A pro subscription also turns on video mixing, with output support to external displays. There's a library of visualizers in djay that work with this feature. If you have a new iPad Pro with USB-C, you can use external displays and be connected to DJ hardware at the same time.

looper with visual mixer
The looper when used with visual mixer


Turning on the subscription also enables an advanced media library with playlist editing and management, smart filters, and iOS drag and drop integration with the Files app and Dropbox.

Djay takes advantage of the power of the A12 Bionic processor. Every sample in the new looper can be assigned a video clip that plays in time with the audio. With the power of the A12 Bionic chip, you can now mix up to ten videos in real-time, right on the iOS device.

djay


Earlier, we mentioned the Automix AI engine. An AI is only as good as the training that gives it the data to work with. Here, Algoriddim trained the AI using training sets from human DJs.

Automix AI intelligently identifies rhythmic patterns and the best intro and outro sections of songs. It then calculates optimal fade durations and automatically applies parameter changes to EQs and filters for a seamless transition. Users can fully customize their preferred mix settings and start the automix with a single tap.

djay also now includes Ableton Link, a protocol Ableton developed that allows apps from multiple vendors to all sync up to the same beat on a shared Wi-Fi network. Inclusion of Ableton Link means you can use djay to jam with friends using desktops or compatible mobile apps, and your djay beats will play in tempo with the their applications.

The new version of djay is available now on the App Store for free, and comes with a seven-day trial of all pro features.

Upgrading to a pro subscription for all the sounds, visuals, and other features is priced at $4.99 a month. Existing customers who purchased a version of djay in the past on iOS are eligible for an entire year's subscription for $9.99 -- $30 off the standard pricing, or a year for two month's price.





The new djay for iOS is compatible with any iPhone or iPad running iOS 11.2 or later.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    "Free with subscription"?

    Is that like "being healthy with a cocaine habit"?
    edited December 2018 gutengel
  • Reply 2 of 14
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Not a fan of the subscription model for software.
    Everybody- including Tim Cook's Apple- wants to scratch your pocket every month.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    davgreg said:
    Not a fan of the subscription model for software.
    Everybody- including Tim Cook's Apple- wants to scratch your pocket every month.
    Don’t like it, don’t use it.
  • Reply 5 of 14
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
    I don't think someone would want to hear commercials at a club for example. 
  • Reply 6 of 14
    gustavgustav Posts: 823member
    davgreg said:
    Not a fan of the subscription model for software.
    Everybody- including Tim Cook's Apple- wants to scratch your pocket every month.
    It was inevitable. These days, people don't want to pay more than a few dollars no matter how complex the software is. A company can't stay in business earning a few dollars per unit sale. People used to pay tens of dollars for simple utilities and hundreds of dollars for professional applications before iPhones came on the scene. So either we have subscriptions or we somehow demonstrate there are enough of us willing to pay what it costs to produce quality software.
  • Reply 7 of 14
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 651editor
    You can use plenty of features without the subscription.

    The subscription is 5 bucks a month. Turn it on when you need the features, turn it off when you don't. The difficulty Apple has is, they have a thriving app economy. How are indie devs supposed to stay in business to support that app economy?
  • Reply 8 of 14
    davgreg said:
    Not a fan of the subscription model for software.
    Everybody- including Tim Cook's Apple- wants to scratch your pocket every month.

    Nothing wrong with it - depending on the software, of course.

    Office 365 is a great example of a subscription done well. Fantastic value for your money, regular updates and massive OneDrive storage.

    Considering the market for this software (DJ’s) it doesn’t seem like a bad deal at all. Someone who does this stuff regularly shouldn’t complain about $5 a month.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,959member
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
    If all you've ever been exposed to is DJs playing pop hits/well known music (probably in shopping malls and whatnot), then that opinion makes sense.  There are DJs who are deeply into sound, music, and creating experiences which you could never get just from sitting in front of a radio.  Some of us look for more than culture by proxy.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 651editor
    auxio said:
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
    If all you've ever been exposed to is DJs playing pop hits/well known music (probably in shopping malls and whatnot), then that opinion makes sense.  There are DJs who are deeply into sound, music, and creating experiences which you could never get just from sitting in front of a radio.  Some of us look for more than culture by proxy.
    I would add to that, the more mundane DJ for weddings/bar mitzvahs/parties. Not trying to create a sound experience, just trying to play the music the crowd wants, be high enough energy to get people out on the floor, lead some games and dances, and maybe run it from an iPad.  The 5 dollars is inconsequential when you're billing for the whole party.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,959member
    vmarks said:
    auxio said:
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
    If all you've ever been exposed to is DJs playing pop hits/well known music (probably in shopping malls and whatnot), then that opinion makes sense.  There are DJs who are deeply into sound, music, and creating experiences which you could never get just from sitting in front of a radio.  Some of us look for more than culture by proxy.
    I would add to that, the more mundane DJ for weddings/bar mitzvahs/parties. Not trying to create a sound experience, just trying to play the music the crowd wants, be high enough energy to get people out on the floor, lead some games and dances, and maybe run it from an iPad.  The 5 dollars is inconsequential when you're billing for the whole party.
    Right, and music for gatherings of people who don't really have an active interest in music.  A Spotify or iTunes playlist of favourite hits could easily replace the DJ in those situations.  Even the core (free) functionality in Djay is good enough for most DJs.  The pay wall is really for features which only professional DJs need (MIDI controllers, effects, advanced library management, etc).
  • Reply 12 of 14
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    davgreg said:
    Not a fan of the subscription model for software.
    Everybody- including Tim Cook's Apple- wants to scratch your pocket every month.
    I’m not a fan of paying for anything to be honest, but I understand how difficult it is to make future plans without a stable revenue stream. 

    When faced with a massive layout of several hundred pounds for an upgrade every year or so, most folk balked at paying it in one hit. 

    And before ore someone jumps in and says they prefer to own the software, then check your licence agreement: you have bought the right to use the software (with no guarantees that it won’t teash your entire network), but not the right to sell the licence on – which means you never owned the software you think you bought. 
  • Reply 13 of 14
    auxio said:
    vmarks said:
    auxio said:
    I’ve never understood the need for a live DJ. Just turn on the radio.
    If all you've ever been exposed to is DJs playing pop hits/well known music (probably in shopping malls and whatnot), then that opinion makes sense.  There are DJs who are deeply into sound, music, and creating experiences which you could never get just from sitting in front of a radio.  Some of us look for more than culture by proxy.
    I would add to that, the more mundane DJ for weddings/bar mitzvahs/parties. Not trying to create a sound experience, just trying to play the music the crowd wants, be high enough energy to get people out on the floor, lead some games and dances, and maybe run it from an iPad.  The 5 dollars is inconsequential when you're billing for the whole party.
    Right, and music for gatherings of people who don't really have an active interest in music.  A Spotify or iTunes playlist of favourite hits could easily replace the DJ in those situations.  Even the core (free) functionality in Djay is good enough for most DJs.  The pay wall is really for features which only professional DJs need (MIDI controllers, effects, advanced library management, etc).
    And even the free level supports four or five MIDI hardware controllers.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    xbitxbit Posts: 226member
    vmarks said:
    You can use plenty of features without the subscription.

    The subscription is 5 bucks a month. Turn it on when you need the features, turn it off when you don't. The difficulty Apple has is, they have a thriving app economy. How are indie devs supposed to stay in business to support that app economy?
    I couldn't agree more. The developers have made more features available for free and yet still people complain.

    Keeping iOS apps updated is expensive. The alternative to the subscription model is janky non-native apps that are cheaper to make or developers pulling their apps completely.
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