Apple in talks to put Apple Watch into the hands of Medicare users

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 25
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,329member
    True prevention can only be done with a healthy lifestyle.
    I'm sure you didn't mean to imply that simply eating right and exercise can overcome genetic/hereditary disorders, birth defects, and other "built-in" problems people deal with. You're correct that these things can both prolong life and improve the quality of that life, but ... let's not forget that not everyone is starting out life from the same mark.

    I concur with you that a large part of the healthcare system is designed to medicate rather that rehabilitate some unhealthy lifestyle choices, but somehow other countries (the ones with universal health care) manage to do "more" against that with "less" (way less, in terms of money). As you correctly point out, the for-profit healthcare model is really the problem -- since it fosters and benefits from not preventing unhealthy choices.
    edited January 2019 macguiStrangeDays
  • Reply 22 of 25
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    volcan said:
    My problem with the Apple Watch is that I need to use my reading glasses to see the small text. I can't do that while driving because the reading glasses only focus for a close distance - not suitable while driving or even walking around for that matter. I'm thinking of getting RK but I've read it doesn't remain effective past a few years.
    The simple solution here is to use Voice Over, part of the accessibility features on most all Apple devices. I was blind for three years recently and relied on Voice Over to "tell" me what was on the screen. For those who are driving and don't want to move their hands off the wheel, you could just ask Siri to read things like text messages and dictate messages to other people. Hands free, eyes free, what could be better?
    There is a big difference between being completely blind  and just aging eyes. If you are blind you turn on Voice Over once and always depend on it. When you need reading glasses only for tiny text your are not going to be bothered with turning Voice Over on and off all the time.

    My best friend from childhood is blind and he has an iPhone but has a lot of complaints about the software. He actually programmed the accessibility voice software for Microsoft’s implementation in Windows.

    He is constantly asking for my help with his iPhone because the controls are not user friendly for the blind and often don’t work as advertised. Sure he is a unique case but he often says that Apple should have consulted him when developing their interface as he is widely considered the foremost authority in this subject and the original inventor of the technology.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 23 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    chasm said:
    True prevention can only be done with a healthy lifestyle.
    I'm sure you didn't mean to imply that simply eating right and exercise can overcome genetic/hereditary disorders, birth defects, and other "built-in" problems people deal with. You're correct that these things can both prolong life and improve the quality of that life, but ... let's not forget that not everyone is starting out life from the same mark.

    I concur with you that a large part of the healthcare system is designed to medicate rather that rehabilitate some unhealthy lifestyle choices, but somehow other countries (the ones with universal health care) manage to do "more" against that with "less" (way less, in terms of money). As you correctly point out, the for-profit healthcare model is really the problem -- since it fosters and benefits from not preventing unhealthy choices.
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    Actually, I pretty much did mean just that.   While there are exceptions here and there, generally, genetics accounts for about 20% while environment / lifestyle the other 80%.  But, "we" tend to take the lazy way out and blame either aging or genes for our heart disease, diabetes, COPD, diabetes, arthritis, etc....

    Or, perhaps it might have been put better with "Genes load the gun, lifestyle pulls the trigger"

    I think a big part of the problem is few people know what constitutes a healthy lifestyle.  Instead they follow some fad diet and think that a stroll in the park a few times a week constitutes "exercise"  -- all the while living a totally stressed out life.  Plus, in modern times, they're likely 30-40 pounds over weight -- but think its normal because everybody else is too.    And, since few of those chronic diseases show up before about 50 or so, they are lulled into a sense of complacency.   But, they don't realize that most of those diseases start in very early adulthood and slowly, year by year progress until they get bad enough to be diagnosed by a physician.



  • Reply 24 of 25
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,912member
    volcan said:
    volcan said:
    My problem with the Apple Watch is that I need to use my reading glasses to see the small text. I can't do that while driving because the reading glasses only focus for a close distance - not suitable while driving or even walking around for that matter. I'm thinking of getting RK but I've read it doesn't remain effective past a few years.
    The simple solution here is to use Voice Over, part of the accessibility features on most all Apple devices. I was blind for three years recently and relied on Voice Over to "tell" me what was on the screen. For those who are driving and don't want to move their hands off the wheel, you could just ask Siri to read things like text messages and dictate messages to other people. Hands free, eyes free, what could be better?
    There is a big difference between being completely blind  and just aging eyes. If you are blind you turn on Voice Over once and always depend on it. When you need reading glasses only for tiny text your are not going to be bothered with turning Voice Over on and off all the time.

    My best friend from childhood is blind and he has an iPhone but has a lot of complaints about the software. He actually programmed the accessibility voice software for Microsoft’s implementation in Windows.

    He is constantly asking for my help with his iPhone because the controls are not user friendly for the blind and often don’t work as advertised. Sure he is a unique case but he often says that Apple should have consulted him when developing their interface as he is widely considered the foremost authority in this subject and the original inventor of the technology.
    Yeah I don’t know about that — Apple has received multiple awards for accessibility for the blind, including VoiceOver:

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/15/05/06/apple-voiceover-accessibility-receives-award-from-american-foundation-for-the-blind

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/17/01/27/apple-honored-with-louis-braille-award-for-efforts-in-device-accessibility-

    ...I’d have to weight those blind groups over what your friend from Microsoft says. 

    edited January 2019
  • Reply 25 of 25
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    volcan said:
    volcan said:
    My problem with the Apple Watch is that I need to use my reading glasses to see the small text. I can't do that while driving because the reading glasses only focus for a close distance - not suitable while driving or even walking around for that matter. I'm thinking of getting RK but I've read it doesn't remain effective past a few years.
    The simple solution here is to use Voice Over, part of the accessibility features on most all Apple devices. I was blind for three years recently and relied on Voice Over to "tell" me what was on the screen. For those who are driving and don't want to move their hands off the wheel, you could just ask Siri to read things like text messages and dictate messages to other people. Hands free, eyes free, what could be better?
    There is a big difference between being completely blind  and just aging eyes. If you are blind you turn on Voice Over once and always depend on it. When you need reading glasses only for tiny text your are not going to be bothered with turning Voice Over on and off all the time.

    My best friend from childhood is blind and he has an iPhone but has a lot of complaints about the software. He actually programmed the accessibility voice software for Microsoft’s implementation in Windows.

    He is constantly asking for my help with his iPhone because the controls are not user friendly for the blind and often don’t work as advertised. Sure he is a unique case but he often says that Apple should have consulted him when developing their interface as he is widely considered the foremost authority in this subject and the original inventor of the technology.
    Yeah I don’t know about that — Apple has received multiple awards for accessibility for the blind, including VoiceOver:

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/15/05/06/apple-voiceover-accessibility-receives-award-from-american-foundation-for-the-blind

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/17/01/27/apple-honored-with-louis-braille-award-for-efforts-in-device-accessibility-

    ...I’d have to weight those blind groups over what your friend from Microsoft says. 

    Sure he agrees the iPhone is the best device  available for the blind but still sucks in his opinion. The guy has an IQ off the charts. Perhaps he is just a grumpy old man and he also isn’t very complimentary of blind people in general. According to him they are lazy, no motivation to overcome their disability just waiting for their SSDI benefits.  He on the other hand is a self made multimillionaire developing software while blind. He has a Helen Keller studio that he completely financed on his own where he has dozens of workstations with his software and conducts training to prepare blind people to enter the workforce. Those foundations are just interested in making paid endorsements and collecting government contributions. Mostly just bureacratic organizations.
    GeorgeBMac
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