If you wanted an iPhone SE new from Apple, you've probably missed your chance

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 28

    That's one sexy looking phone!

    Actually looking back, every iPhone besides the 3G (and 3GS) & the iPhone 6 are really great looking. The 7 with the Jet Black also looked slick.

  • Reply 22 of 28
    Best Buy: you can still find new SE’s linked to pre-paid “plans” for $140-$200, or pre-owned/refurb SE’s ($varied)
    edited January 22
  • Reply 23 of 28
    wood1208 said:
    SE is the last iPhone(or any phone) in 4" screen size. World has moved to larger screen phones even in 3rd world countries user base.  
    Not "even in third-world countries" -- especially in third-world countries. For less affluent people who can't afford multiple devices, a smartphone is their computer, and a larger screen makes perfect sense.
    mattinoz
  • Reply 24 of 28
    Wife recently finally bought an iPhone -- an SE. She loves the size. As an iPad user, I, too, would much prefer to use a smaller form factor for a phone. Dear Apple: There is a market for SE-sized phones.
  • Reply 25 of 28
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,448member
    cincytee said:
    wood1208 said:
    SE is the last iPhone(or any phone) in 4" screen size. World has moved to larger screen phones even in 3rd world countries user base.  
    Not "even in third-world countries" -- especially in third-world countries. For less affluent people who can't afford multiple devices, a smartphone is their computer, and a larger screen makes perfect sense.
    A reasonable assumption. That said, I’d argue that such a market is not Apple’s primary customer base. And the Apple-related mantra of ‘using the right tool for the right job’ suggests in this context that more affluent customers would prefer to carry a smaller more portable phone, and switching to a larger device for easier computer-oriented activities. One could even say that owning a large phone could be a sign of being less-affluent, which for many status seekers could be an important distinction.
  • Reply 26 of 28
    I'm a Senior Citizen with two SEs.  I'll keep both until Apple does something to make them unusable.  One is my home/house phone. The other one is used for fund-raising for our hospital and church.   (and, it's the one that gets all the robocalls)

    Why not upgrade?

    With arthritis, it's difficult to use any iPhone with only one hand, but that one hand can grasp an SE, whereas a larger and much thinner phone can be dropped without thinking.   And, using an SE as a communications device  (as a phone, for goodness sake!) is easier, as the hold on its form factor promotes better communication.  Ever try to use an X, Xs or XS max merely as a phone if  you're an old fud?  No contest.

    If I do have to upgrade, it  will be to an 8.

    Just a thought from a guy who began wireless communications as as a ham radio operator.
  • Reply 27 of 28
    PG Apple userPG Apple user Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    If you are in or close to Canada the SE is available new, boxed, unlocked at Costco stores.  $399 can for the 128g space grey.
  • Reply 28 of 28
    mac_128 said:
    cincytee said:
    wood1208 said:
    SE is the last iPhone(or any phone) in 4" screen size. World has moved to larger screen phones even in 3rd world countries user base.  
    Not "even in third-world countries" -- especially in third-world countries. For less affluent people who can't afford multiple devices, a smartphone is their computer, and a larger screen makes perfect sense.
    A reasonable assumption. That said, I’d argue that such a market is not Apple’s primary customer base. And the Apple-related mantra of ‘using the right tool for the right job’ suggests in this context that more affluent customers would prefer to carry a smaller more portable phone, and switching to a larger device for easier computer-oriented activities. One could even say that owning a large phone could be a sign of being less-affluent, which for many status seekers could be an important distinction.
    Good point. I didn't mean to equate market dynamics in more affluent and less affluent countries. Everyplace has different influences. Nor does my comment reflect variations in regional preference, like the much-discussed trend in Asia toward larger phones.
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