iOS 12.2 beta suggests next-gen iPad and iPad mini might not sport Face ID, references new...

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  • Reply 21 of 28
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,657member
    You have got to be kidding me!  It is time for TouchID and Home Buttons to die!
    I prefer the surety of both over the uncertainty of Face ID.
    What do you find uncertain with FaceID?
    henrybay said:
    Thank goodness. I love Touch ID and am glad it will stay on the next iPads. 

    I also love Touch ID on my iPhone 8. In fact, I like it so much I refuse to buy an iPhone without it. 

    I did did try an iPhone XR for 10 days but swapped it back for an 8 because I missed Touch ID. I also worry about the safety of Face ID and beaming infrared laser spots into my retina tens of thousands of times a year. 

    Do you worry about standing in front of a microwave, too? I suggest you look up the data on light frequency, intensity, direction and the physics involved before making statements about safety.
    edited January 27
  • Reply 22 of 28
    MplsP said:
    You have got to be kidding me!  It is time for TouchID and Home Buttons to die!
    I prefer the surety of both over the uncertainty of Face ID.
    What do you find uncertain with FaceID?
    henrybay said:
    Thank goodness. I love Touch ID and am glad it will stay on the next iPads. 

    I also love Touch ID on my iPhone 8. In fact, I like it so much I refuse to buy an iPhone without it. 

    I did did try an iPhone XR for 10 days but swapped it back for an 8 because I missed Touch ID. I also worry about the safety of Face ID and beaming infrared laser spots into my retina tens of thousands of times a year. 

    Do you worry about standing in front of a microwave, too? I suggest you look up the data on light frequency, intensity, direction and the physics involved before making statements about safety.
    It’s more about intentional unlocks and triggers with Touch ID, versus accidental unlocks and triggers with Face ID. Also, clicking the Home button while the iPhone isn’t visible is possible with Touch ID. Not so when looking at the phone is a requirement.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 23 of 28
    I will be disappointed if the next iPad has a Home button. I suppose Face ID in an entry-level product might be considered wishful thinking, but Apple did it with the iPhone XR so part of me still has hope.

    I also really hope it gets the squared-off edges of the latest iPad Pros. It looks fantastic.
  • Reply 24 of 28
    I will be disappointed if the next iPad has a Home button. I suppose Face ID in an entry-level product might be considered wishful thinking, but Apple did it with the iPhone XR so part of me still has hope.

    I also really hope it gets the squared-off edges of the latest iPad Pros. It looks fantastic.

    Do you consider iPhone XR as an entry-level product? That too at $750 price tag? Possibility of Face ID being available in the new $329 iPad is very very slim.
  • Reply 25 of 28
    If true and the Mini 5 will uses the same chassis as the Mini 4. The components inside will it be 2 years old or 3? How much RAM will Apple generously install, 3 or 4 GBs? A11 is a given since we are in 2019 already and in September A13 will be release.
  • Reply 26 of 28
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,296member
    SpamSandwich said:
    It’s more about intentional unlocks and triggers with Touch ID, versus accidental unlocks and triggers with Face ID. Also, clicking the Home button while the iPhone isn’t visible is possible with Touch ID. Not so when looking at the phone is a requirement.
    I don't understand how people don't get this concept. I'm sure Face ID is quite nice most of the time, but it isn't hard to think of problem situations. For example, if the phone is laying in the center console in the car or on the passenger seat, I can unlock it with Touch ID, but not Face ID. And, if I hold my phone in front of my face, it doesn't unlock with Touch ID unless I want it to, but it will (if I understand correctly) with Face ID.

    It's kine of like the dancing paper clip. I actually want to control when I lock or unlock, not have the device 'guess' what I want to do. More and more of Apple's stuff these days is going the way of the dancing paper clip. Instead of letting me decide, Apple thinks they know better than I do... and they are determined to force me into their assumptions.

    muthuk_vanalingam said:
    Do you consider iPhone XR as an entry-level product?
    No, it seems Apple decided not to do entry-level anymore, just old at a discount. :disappointed: 
  • Reply 27 of 28
    Do you consider iPhone XR as an entry-level product?
    Not really the point, but I get what you're saying. The point was Apple introduced two new models last year, a "Flagship" with two variants and a less expensive alternative. Even the lower-priced model got Face ID. The only models with a Home button are holdovers from previous years, which might be an indication that it won't be finding its way into new models anymore.

    That too at $750 price tag?
    "Entry level" does not automatically mean "inexpensive." Check out an entry level Mercedes. Even the most basic model requires a sizeable chunk of dough.

    Possibility of Face ID being available in the new $329 iPad is very very slim.
    That assumes Face ID costs Apple more to implement than Touch ID. Maybe Face ID is actually cheaper than Touch ID in a Home button. Do we know for sure one way or the other?

    Also, even if Face ID costs more, maybe the iPad won't be $329 anymore. Apple repositioned the Mac mini from a low-cost switcher enticement to a much more capable machine at a higher price. Maybe the iPad will take a similar path.

    I have no ideas if any of that is more or less likely than the 2019 iPad having a Home button, but I do know we don't have enough information to predict definitively which technologies will and won't find their way into new models.
  • Reply 28 of 28
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,296member
    lorin schultz said:
    That assumes Face ID costs Apple more to implement than Touch ID. Maybe Face ID is actually cheaper than Touch ID in a Home button. Do we know for sure one way or the other?
    That's actually a good point. Maybe someone has some actual data, but my guess is that people are just assuming because it's newer and on higher priced products, it must cost more. Either that, or Tim's somewhat recent statement about putting 'more' into the newer products, making them more expensive. That's probably more the OLED screen though, than necessarily FaceID vs TouchID. I'd actually think FaceID would be cheaper to implement, as it doesn't require taptic and such... probably frees up some space, too.
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