Court rules man must be given access to husband's iCloud photos

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 31
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,892member
    kimberly said:
    That’s the way they chose to live, so it is what it is. but you have to wonder what kind of relationship it was that the password wasn’t shared. 

    Seems a little off. 
    Says more about you than them :D
    Actually, come to think of it Mrs Entropy and I share a password for our Apple ID. Had it since the itools days.
    I don’t think it says anything about 9secondkox2 at all. What do you think it says about them?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 31
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,518member
    rob53 said:
    We’re talking about family so why wouldn’t each of them have written down essential account information and stored them in a safe? If they had the surviving spouse would have been able to access the deceased Apple ID.

    it’s not Apple’s responsibility to do this. Forcing Apple to do it sets a bad precedent for other types of access by police and others. 
    You would be surprised at just how many people just don't plan for death and how assets should be handled. The second someone enters into a marriage, they need to start planning for such circumstances. But that's seldom done.


    WmH said:
    Get down to the real reason!!!
    What 'real reason'? You think somebody at AI or here knows the real reason? Or are you trying to imply that you know the 'real reason'. You sound like a conspiracy nutjob.


    kimberly said:
    That’s the way they chose to live, so it is what it is. but you have to wonder what kind of relationship it was that the password wasn’t shared. 

    Seems a little off. 
    Says more about you than them :D
    Maybe, maybe not. Well, maybe. It's far more common than not for married couples to share passwords to 'community' stuff, particularly things like joint bank accounts. There may be business reasons that something might not be shared. I don't know any couples who don't share passwords to traditional accounts.

    So I find it potentially a bit odd the password wasn't shared, but not enough consider something might be off with the relationship.

    Ok, so It doesn't make me wonder, and you're right, kimberly. LOL
  • Reply 23 of 31
    christophb said:

    Apple does not offer a shared photo library and anyone who doesn't also have a Mac may not have it locally stored.  
    No shared photo library but there is “Shared albums” functionality.

  • Reply 24 of 31
    croprcropr Posts: 966member
    rob53 said:
    clexman said:
    rob53 said:
    We’re talking about family so why wouldn’t each of them have written down essential account information and stored them in a safe? If they had the surviving spouse would have been able to access the deceased Apple ID.

    it’s not Apple’s responsibility to do this. Forcing Apple to do it sets a bad precedent for other types of access by police and others. 
    Considering that writing passwords down is not recommended, it doesn't seem that not having them written down is surprising. My wife forgets her passwords all the time and has to reset them. I don't remember all of them.
    Actually, writing down and protecting your Apple ID password is recommended. Apple no longer retains any way to recover that password so it makes sense to save it somehow. Put it in a safe or safety deposit box. Just don’t write it on a sticky and put it on the back of your keyboard. 
    Lesson 101 of security. Writing down passwords was, is and will always be stupid.    In a lot of cases you will be held legally responsible for the fraud related to the password theft
    MplsP
  • Reply 25 of 31
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,726member
    No problem.  Nothing to see here, just a family and courts going through the process.

    Might want to spell out digital assets in your will though.  One poster here at appleinsider had over $150k in music... it would be a shame to have it just disappear.
    I'd have to look at the iTunes agreement (which I admittedly haven't read thoroughly,) but I imagine that when you purchase music on iTunes, the digital rights end with you. If that's the case then that $150k may be gone. If it was MP3s stored on an iCloud drive it might be different. Then it depends on the policies for accessing stored files are.

    Whether you can bequeath digital assets depends on state law, but it's something that even more tech savvy people wouldn't necessarily think about and I'm sure many estate planning lawyers don't think about either, meaning it will get missed quite often and we'll see more cases like this one.

    jbdragon said:
    clexman said:
    rob53 said:
    We’re talking about family so why wouldn’t each of them have written down essential account information and stored them in a safe? If they had the surviving spouse would have been able to access the deceased Apple ID.

    it’s not Apple’s responsibility to do this. Forcing Apple to do it sets a bad precedent for other types of access by police and others. 
    Considering that writing passwords down is not recommended, it doesn't seem that not having them written down is surprising. My wife forgets her passwords all the time and has to reset them. I don't remember all of them.
    This is why you use something like Lastpass.  You shouldn't know any of your passwords.  If you can, they're to easy to break!!!.  Lastpass also has a feature you can turn on so that on the case of your death, you can have others gain access.  This is done by giving others a password. They start the process.  Lastpass will email you and at a timeframe you set, if you don't respondct u know, because you're dead, your spouse or whoever can then gain access to all your passwords.

    My passwords these days are at least 20 digits, all computer generated with Lastpass.  It works with all my different hardware.  It's pretty quick to log into sites on the iPhone these days.  FaceID makes it pretty painless.
    except if your next of kin doesn't have your lastpass/1password password you're totally hosed. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 31
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,452member
    No problem.  Nothing to see here, just a family and courts going through the process.

    Might want to spell out digital assets in your will though.  One poster here at appleinsider had over $150k in music... it would be a shame to have it just disappear.
    Does this mean in certain states a person's online accounts can also be bequeathed to an heir? Eg, Apple software purchases?
    I don’t believe Apple transfers purchases from one person to another, as the media and software licenses extend to one person only and don’t pass to heirs. I recall quite a lot of controversy about this practice a few years ago, but I’m not sure Apple’s position has changed.
  • Reply 27 of 31
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,941member
    djsherly said:
    That’s the way they chose to live, so it is what it is. but you have to wonder what kind of relationship it was that the password wasn’t shared. 

    Seems a little off. 
    That’s the way they chose to live, so it is what it is. but you have to wonder what kind of relationship it was that the password wasn’t shared. 

    Seems a little off. 
    What a load of shit. My wife and me share no passwords. If I want to see something I just need to ask. The same goes the other way around. The idea that married people are joined at the hip/password is ridiculous. I suppose you expect couples to share a Facebook account too?
    Especially since people are always resetting passwords for one reason or another. My wife and I have yet to schedule a password update meeting.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 31
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,193member
    No problem.  Nothing to see here, just a family and courts going through the process.

    Might want to spell out digital assets in your will though.  One poster here at appleinsider had over $150k in music... it would be a shame to have it just disappear.
    This seems like a reasonable and sensible response. If there is no will then digital assets should probably be handled through probate. One issue though as others have alluded to is whether cloud repositories should be required to safeguard assets that are in probate until a resolution for distribution is reached. That could lead to a lot of content being in a limbo state and begs the question as to how the storage provider knows that a customer has expired. Part of me thinks that some of these issues may actually be addressed in the EULAs associated with the services in question, which nobody actually reads before agreeing to their terms and conditions. At the very least some sort of uniform standard probably needs to be adopted across all states, provinces, countries, etc.
  • Reply 29 of 31
    WmH said:
    Something is amiss here, why did they not have photo library or iCloud library shared if they were married, passwords shared, the other husband should have all the photos between the two, no court order given or needed. Get down to the real reason!!!
    I'm waiting for Apple to launch a family shared photo library for many years now. My wife and I have to painstakingly share individual pics that are of mutual interest between our iPhones. And although AirDrop facilitates much of the job, this process doubles our combined usage of iCloud storage, which in turn will create another headache down the road...

    Family album sharing is not the answer either, because it just lets you visualize what was manually set to that album, but you can't really do anything else, not even use those images in social media (that was true, at least, to the last time I tried to use it, which was many years ago).

    I find it funny, my whole family gets automatically everything that I buy: music, movies, books, apps and storage. But the thing we really make for each other, are harder to get thorugh.
  • Reply 30 of 31
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,025member
    forget about the "should have done this or that" a man's spouse expectantly died in an accident and his husband wants to download images which were not already shared between the two.  This is not a case of local, state of fed government doing a criminal investigation so a judge will grant this every time. 


  • Reply 31 of 31
    " The DOJ backed down when it managed to crack the iPhone with third-party assistance."

    Where they spent a lot of tax payer money learning nothing. Everything on the phone was info they had. 
    watto_cobra
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