Boosted debuts iPhone-connected, 24mph Rev scooter

Posted:
in iPhone edited May 15
Until now known for its electric skateboards, Boosted on Wednesday launched the Rev, its first scooter, complete with integrated iPhone support.

Boosted Rev


The Rev has a top speed of 24 miles per hour and a range of up to 22 miles, depending on factors like weight, temperature, and hills. Twin motors should allow it to climb grades as steep as 25 percent.

Aside from offering better speed and range than the Ninebot/Xiaomi scooters used by companies like Bird and Lime, the Rev is also designed to be tougher, longer-lasting, and more weather-resistant. Boosted told AppleInsider that the vehicle should even survive rainstorms, as the company spray-tested it to ensure waterproofing.

Other distinguishing features include a throttle wheel, twin electric brakes, ergonomic handlebars and wide, Boosted-designed tires. The scooter lacks any suspension systems, but Boosted promises that the tires should be enough to cushion against most terrain.

Boosted Rev


Boosted Rev



Owners can track rides, mileage, and estimated range through the existing Boosted iPhone app. Multiple speed settings are available, and more app features are promised in the future. The scooter itself has an LED display with basic data.

Boosted Rev


Preorders for the Rev begin today at a cost of $1,599, the same as the Boosted Stealth. Deliveries will start sometime this summer.



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    Ad?

    I thought of buying a Segway once... once.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    Roger_FingasRoger_Fingas Posts: 133member, editor
    Ad?

    I thought of buying a Segway once... once.
    No, not a product ad, just a launch. Boosted is a huge deal in e-skate and the Rev has been highly anticipated in the scooter industry.
    boxcatcherchasmrepressthis
  • Reply 3 of 7
    sandorsandor Posts: 507member
    As speeds grow, it is going to be interesting to watch what happens.

    Pennsylvania's Department of Transportation has already laid out what is required:

    A motorized scooter is a 2-wheeled vehicle powered by an engine or an electric motor and does not have a seat or saddle for the driver. These vehicles are not exempt from titling and registration requirements as set forth by PennDOT and would be required to pass equipment standards and inspection requirements.However, these vehicles do not comply with the equipment standards and inspection requirements for motor vehicles, and cannot be titled or registered within the commonwealth. In addition, these vehicles cannot be operated on Pennsylvania roadways or sidewalks.



    Same as a moped - gotta get it registered & plated. But PA is saying they do not meet equipment standards & inspection requirement so cannot be titled, registered or operated on roadways or sidewalks in the Commonwealth.



    edited May 15 larz2112
  • Reply 4 of 7
    larz2112larz2112 Posts: 275member
    About a month ago the University of Texas in Austin started using geofencing on campus to limit the speed of rental dockless scooters on campus. In high-traffic areas the max speed is 8 mph, in others it is 15 mph. This was a reactionary measure due to the high number of accidents and injuries involving the scooters.
    https://austin.curbed.com/2019/3/26/18282473/scooter-speed-limits-geofencing-ut-austin

    The Rev's max speed is 24 mph. I would assume that geofencing only works with the rental scooters and would have no impact on the Rev. So are you technically "breaking the rules" at UT if you buy a Rev and drive faster than the geofencing speed limits? If not, would more people be inclined to buy their own Rev so that they could scoot around campus much more quickly? It is interesting to see how this mode of transportation has evolved and is still doing so.
    Roger_Fingasrepressthis
  • Reply 5 of 7
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 144member
    Wish it wasn't 3x the price of an Xiaomi
  • Reply 6 of 7
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,411member
    I get the concept of micro mobility, and for some people and in some ways its a vast improvement on cars and the infrastructure you need to support cars. But if you’re not getting any exercise value out of these scooters (and the similar electric skateboards), why not just get something you can sit on and can be run legally for that kind of money?
    sandor
  • Reply 7 of 7
    sandorsandor Posts: 507member
    chasm said:
    I get the concept of micro mobility, and for some people and in some ways its a vast improvement on cars and the infrastructure you need to support cars. But if you’re not getting any exercise value out of these scooters (and the similar electric skateboards), why not just get something you can sit on and can be run legally for that kind of money?
    Agree with this.

    You can get pedal assist e-bikes for much much less, even folding ones. And high end commuter e-bikes (some of the biggest Dutch names, for instance) for about the same price. 

    Perhaps cities like Philadelphia are a bit spoiled with our 30+ miles of interconnected bicycle trails that mirror some of the biggest commuter highways...
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