The best USB-C to Lightning cables released so far

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 54
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I am not sure I see the advantage of any these:   The one meter Apple cable is only $19 and it remains pretty much the gold standard.   While I have no doubt some 3rd party cables can surpass it, the fact is, you never really know.   So, why take the chance?

    I'll be stopping by the Apple store to pick one up along with a 30 watt charger for his iPhone Xr for his upcoming birthday.
  • Reply 42 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    I am not sure I see the advantage of any these:   The one meter Apple cable is only $19 and it remains pretty much the gold standard.   While I have no doubt some 3rd party cables can surpass it, the fact is, you never really know.   So, why take the chance?

    I'll be stopping by the Apple store to pick one up along with a 30 watt charger for his iPhone Xr for his upcoming birthday.
    Why a 30W charger for your XR when it doesn't offer any utility over the 18W charger? If you want to spend extra money on a charger I'd spend it on a GaN option for easily portability and packability.

    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 43 of 54
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,757member
    melgross said:
    I doubt it. Some things just cost more. People are so jaded and suspicious these days. Cables used to cost $200 when $200 was worth a lot more. These are still cheap. The problem is that people are even cheaper.
    Used to own a computer store.  The markup on cables is insane.  $40 printer cables cost me $1.20.  Was a great way to have a lot of stock on the wall to fill out the store though.  I wanted to fill an empty wall so I started stocking a couple of each cable and all kinds of adapters and I ended up getting more foot traffic from that wall of cables and adapters.  As an early Mac adopter, getting SCSI cables at cost was a huge boon (those suckers were expensive - but they had lots of lines and pins/expensive connectors).

    But I digress - high quality well made cables don't have to cost an arm and leg if you just shop around a bit.  For example I found monoprice's old dock connectors for the iPod/pre-lightning iPhones to be way more durable than Apple's for a fraction of the cost and I really like their lightning cables with the LEDs that let you see the charge status.  
    commentzillacgWerks
  • Reply 44 of 54
    docno42 said:
    melgross said:
    I doubt it. Some things just cost more. People are so jaded and suspicious these days. Cables used to cost $200 when $200 was worth a lot more. These are still cheap. The problem is that people are even cheaper.
    Used to own a computer store.  The markup on cables is insane.  $40 printer cables cost me $1.20.  Was a great way to have a lot of stock on the wall to fill out the store though.  I wanted to fill an empty wall so I started stocking a couple of each cable and all kinds of adapters and I ended up getting more foot traffic from that wall of cables and adapters.  As an early Mac adopter, getting SCSI cables at cost was a huge boon (those suckers were expensive - but they had lots of lines and pins/expensive connectors).

    But I digress - high quality well made cables don't have to cost an arm and leg if you just shop around a bit.  For example I found monoprice's old dock connectors for the iPod/pre-lightning iPhones to be way more durable than Apple's for a fraction of the cost and I really like their lightning cables with the LEDs that let you see the charge status.  
    Printer cables and SCSI cables from that era where probably 1000% bulkier than a USB-C lightening cable. In other words, I could probably make 10 or more lightening cables from a single printer or SCSI cable. The guys selling these cables know someone that just bought a $1000 phone is likely to pony up $30 for something pitched as "high quality" with fancy fibres or laser cut surfaces. I own about 5-6 of Apple's plastic lightening cables going back to 2013 and none of them have failed yet. Fools and their money.
  • Reply 45 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    docno42 said:
    melgross said:
    I doubt it. Some things just cost more. People are so jaded and suspicious these days. Cables used to cost $200 when $200 was worth a lot more. These are still cheap. The problem is that people are even cheaper.
    Used to own a computer store.  The markup on cables is insane.  $40 printer cables cost me $1.20.  Was a great way to have a lot of stock on the wall to fill out the store though.  I wanted to fill an empty wall so I started stocking a couple of each cable and all kinds of adapters and I ended up getting more foot traffic from that wall of cables and adapters.  As an early Mac adopter, getting SCSI cables at cost was a huge boon (those suckers were expensive - but they had lots of lines and pins/expensive connectors).

    But I digress - high quality well made cables don't have to cost an arm and leg if you just shop around a bit.  For example I found monoprice's old dock connectors for the iPod/pre-lightning iPhones to be way more durable than Apple's for a fraction of the cost and I really like their lightning cables with the LEDs that let you see the charge status.  
    Printer cables and SCSI cables from that era where probably 1000% bulkier than a USB-C lightening cable. In other words, I could probably make 10 or more lightening cables from a single printer or SCSI cable. The guys selling these cables know someone that just bought a $1000 phone is likely to pony up $30 for something pitched as "high quality" with fancy fibres or laser cut surfaces. I own about 5-6 of Apple's plastic lightening cables going back to 2013 and none of them have failed yet. Fools and their money.
    If you honestly believe that you can make 10 or more cables with the proper signal to noise ratio then you should use that as your business model to make a fortune on low cost USB-C cables. Come back here to let us know when you’re rich so we can envious.
    docno42
  • Reply 46 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    docno42 said:
    melgross said:
    I doubt it. Some things just cost more. People are so jaded and suspicious these days. Cables used to cost $200 when $200 was worth a lot more. These are still cheap. The problem is that people are even cheaper.
    Used to own a computer store.  The markup on cables is insane.  $40 printer cables cost me $1.20.  Was a great way to have a lot of stock on the wall to fill out the store though.  I wanted to fill an empty wall so I started stocking a couple of each cable and all kinds of adapters and I ended up getting more foot traffic from that wall of cables and adapters.  As an early Mac adopter, getting SCSI cables at cost was a huge boon (those suckers were expensive - but they had lots of lines and pins/expensive connectors).

    But I digress - high quality well made cables don't have to cost an arm and leg if you just shop around a bit.  For example I found monoprice's old dock connectors for the iPod/pre-lightning iPhones to be way more durable than Apple's for a fraction of the cost and I really like their lightning cables with the LEDs that let you see the charge status.  
    I’ve been using Monoprice for I don’t know how long (decades?). They have durable cables, hard to find cables, a huge variety for common cables, great prices, and they also used to offer ridiculously low next-day delivery to 3 states in what I assume is a now defunct delivery service. That said, you need to keep in mind that for Apple to maintain their ratings for CE they have to forego including materials that Monoprice has no problem using in the products they sell. I think Apple’s cables started wearing faster when they removed PVC, but I’m not certain that was the exclusion.
    edited October 2019 docno42
  • Reply 47 of 54
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Soli said:
    I am not sure I see the advantage of any these:   The one meter Apple cable is only $19 and it remains pretty much the gold standard.   While I have no doubt some 3rd party cables can surpass it, the fact is, you never really know.   So, why take the chance?

    I'll be stopping by the Apple store to pick one up along with a 30 watt charger for his iPhone Xr for his upcoming birthday.
    Why a 30W charger for your XR when it doesn't offer any utility over the 18W charger? If you want to spend extra money on a charger I'd spend it on a GaN option for easily portability and packability.

    My understanding is that, while the curve tends to start smoothing out, that the 30 watt offer a bit faster charging -- at least than Apple's 12 watt charger. And, portability is not an issue here.   But yeh, like everything Apple, they tend to cost more than 3rd party stuff.  Buying Apple has become a bit like the old saying about IBM:  "Nobody ever got fired by buying IBM" -- because you knew it would get the job done.  
    edited October 2019
  • Reply 48 of 54
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Soli said:
    I am not sure I see the advantage of any these:   The one meter Apple cable is only $19 and it remains pretty much the gold standard.   While I have no doubt some 3rd party cables can surpass it, the fact is, you never really know.   So, why take the chance?

    I'll be stopping by the Apple store to pick one up along with a 30 watt charger for his iPhone Xr for his upcoming birthday.
    Why a 30W charger for your XR when it doesn't offer any utility over the 18W charger? If you want to spend extra money on a charger I'd spend it on a GaN option for easily portability and packability.

    Thank you for that tip!
    When I actually went out to buy one I started to see some options I hadn't thought of and ended up coming back here and reading the article you suggested -- it was a good one and, yes, I see how it shows there simply isn't much difference between an 18w and 30w charger in practice.

    Thanks!
    Soli
  • Reply 49 of 54
    There was something conspicuously missing from this review: technical tests. This looks like reviews based on a mere visual inspection, did the reviewer think the cable looked nice and flexed nicely? There is massive confusion over which USB-C cables can perform different functions, and this review does nothing to address this issue.
    dewme
  • Reply 50 of 54
    payecopayeco Posts: 581member
    The regular PowerLine III from Anker has a lifetime warranty. I’m guessing that means we can expect the silica gel coating on these Flow cables to fail around the 18 month mark. 
  • Reply 51 of 54
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,952member
    payeco said:
    The regular PowerLine III from Anker has a lifetime warranty. I’m guessing that means we can expect the silica gel coating on these Flow cables to fail around the 18 month mark. 
    My family members seem to like the Anker Lightning cables from Amazon, which we've started ordering because getting Monoprice cables here now costs and arm & leg (exchange rates, shipping, duty fees, etc.). But, they like them because they don't seem to fail as quickly. The problem is this is likely due to their overly huge jackets and strain-relief sections.

    And, that's exactly why I DO NOT like them! Give me an Apple cable any day with the tiny jacket and short-as-possible length to stick out from the port. Why? Well, because when pressure gets put on the cable (which is why they break in the first place), guess where that pressure gets transferred with the Anchor? Yep, to the port. I'd WAY rather my cables fail than my Lightning port get broken.

    My criteria for a cable? Whatever is going to put the least amount of strain on the physical port itself. I'll actually be careful about how I pull it off, bend it, put pressure, etc. I still have most of my original Apple cables for their devices. They last just fine if you treat them right. If you don't, then they SHOULD break, as that's better than breaking a $1000 device.
  • Reply 52 of 54
    Soli said:
    docno42 said:
    melgross said:
    I doubt it. Some things just cost more. People are so jaded and suspicious these days. Cables used to cost $200 when $200 was worth a lot more. These are still cheap. The problem is that people are even cheaper.
    Used to own a computer store.  The markup on cables is insane.  $40 printer cables cost me $1.20.  Was a great way to have a lot of stock on the wall to fill out the store though.  I wanted to fill an empty wall so I started stocking a couple of each cable and all kinds of adapters and I ended up getting more foot traffic from that wall of cables and adapters.  As an early Mac adopter, getting SCSI cables at cost was a huge boon (those suckers were expensive - but they had lots of lines and pins/expensive connectors).

    But I digress - high quality well made cables don't have to cost an arm and leg if you just shop around a bit.  For example I found monoprice's old dock connectors for the iPod/pre-lightning iPhones to be way more durable than Apple's for a fraction of the cost and I really like their lightning cables with the LEDs that let you see the charge status.  
    Printer cables and SCSI cables from that era where probably 1000% bulkier than a USB-C lightening cable. In other words, I could probably make 10 or more lightening cables from a single printer or SCSI cable. The guys selling these cables know someone that just bought a $1000 phone is likely to pony up $30 for something pitched as "high quality" with fancy fibres or laser cut surfaces. I own about 5-6 of Apple's plastic lightening cables going back to 2013 and none of them have failed yet. Fools and their money.
    If you honestly believe that you can make 10 or more cables with the proper signal to noise ratio then you should use that as your business model to make a fortune on low cost USB-C cables. Come back here to let us know when you’re rich so we can envious.
    There are some hefty margins on some of these cables. I'm sure they're already making a fortune. It's even more obvious with Thunderbolt cables.
  • Reply 53 of 54
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  • Reply 54 of 54
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,415member
    jaba said:
    If you look at the comments on amazon.com for the moncarbone usb cable it does not seem to concur with the appraisal from AI. Or is it "worst quality ever" the same as "best of"?
    You should be wary about placing too much trust in Amazon reviews. I've always leaned on Amazon reviews when searching for new products and doing comparison shopping, but I've encountered some serious issues lately that have made me question my assumptions about the validity and integrity of Amazon reviews. One issue is that some sellers will offer incentives for positive reviews, including gift cards and free products. Another issue is that Amazon sellers routinely send free products to people in exchage for a review. I've receive several offers along these lines (which I decline), but I'd bet they'd cut you off in a heartbeat if your reviews weren't overwhelmingly positive.

    Worse yet, or should I say sleazier still, some sellers will offer even stronger incentives to take down a negative review, or simply bug the living crap out of you via email and/or postal mail to take down a negative review. You may think that Amazon would police or take action against sleazy sellers or intervene on your behalf to get these unscrupulous sellers off your back, but they probably won't, or at least would not for me. They need to preserve their cut of the action. In fact, there's no reason why a vendor whose products are sold by Amazon itself (seller is listed as Amazon) should even have access to your personal information like home address or email, but Amazon doesn't seem to be able to keep that kind of information about you all to itself.

    Sorry for the rant against Amazon, whom I generally believe has excellent customer service, but all I'm saying is that if you believe that all of the reviews that are posted on Amazon are legitimate or even indicative of a trend - think again.

    You can also add me to the list of people who would like to see these cables compared using some sort of quantitative testing method that evaluated the mecahical and electrical characteristics of the cable such as flex tests, conductor resistance, insulation resistance, high voltage testing (hipot test), crosstalk, etc. I know that AI probably doesn't have the facilities or fixtures to perform such testing but perhaps some of these characteristics can be obtained from the product manufacturers or from product certification tests? Call me cynical, but whenever I see fancy looking sheathing or jackets on cables from manufacturers I've never dealt with in the past, I always assume the maker is trying to put lipstick on a pig, because what really matters is what is inside the cable, the design and quality of materials including the conductors and terminators, not the jacket.  
    edited March 2021 cgWerks
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